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In 1974, Porsche's performance version of the 911 was simply known as the 911 Carrera. It had new bumpers that complied to American regulations and the 2.7-liter engine from the Carrera RS 2.7. Other new features for 1974 included new seats, a full-width rear taillight. The Carrera deleted all the chrome off the car in favor of black window frames, wipers, doorhandles, but chrome could be ordered as an option. In 1976 Porsche replaced the Carrera with a new 3.0 liter variant.
The replacement for the SC series came in 1984 as the 911 3.2 Carrera, reviving the Carrera name for the first time since 1977. This was the last iteration in the original 911 series, with all subsequent models featuring new body styling and new brake, electronic, and suspension technologies. Almost the same galvanised body as the SC. Engine was claimed to be 80 per cent new, and the first production 911 to feature an ECU to control the ignition and fuel systems.
Just 50 ‘C16’ cars were manufactured for the UK-market, initially equipped with an uprated engine of 330bhp (from 300) mated to a 4-speed transmission. However, at the end of 1988, the uprated 5-Speed G50 gearbox was introduced, dramatically easing the peaks in power delivery by reducing the effects of ‘turbo-lag’. The factory SE also benefited from a dual-exit exhaust system, limited-slip differential, heated front seats and a sunroof.
Porsche-911-Carrera-RSR-3.0
For the 1974 racing season 911 Carrera RSR 3.0 (246 kW) and RSR Turbo 2.1 (338+ kW) were created - the 3.0L for the customer teams and the 2.1 turbo for Porsche’s own team. The Carrera RSR 3.0 was made in small numbers for racing. The 3.0 RSR would go on to become the most successful Group 4 racing car of its time thanks to its combination of low weight, immense Porsche 917 brakes, impeccable handling, and a 330+hp naturally aspirated flat-6.
Production of the second generation 911 started in August 1973. The 1974 model year G-series derivative replaced the outgoing 1973 model year F-series. Visually, the new 911 was given a major facelift and all three production variants now came with fuel-injected 2.7-litre engines. The entry level 911 had 150bhp, the mid-range 911 S offered 175bhp and the flagship 911 Carrera came with 210bhp. Once again, customers were given the choice of either Coupe or Targa body styles.
As a successor to the Carrera 2.7 MFI, the Carrera 3.0 was fitted with a variation of the 930's engine without a Turbo. During its production period only 3,687 cars were made. The Carrera 3.0 was replaced by the Porsche 911 SC for model year 1978. Between 1976 and 1977, Porsche introduced the Carrera 3.0 with wide rear flares, optional whale-tail, and other luxury options. Built before the ‘911 SC’ it has everything the SC has, and more. It’s a different drive with more power @200bhp; more torque @188 ft/lb @4200rpm and it was 10% lighter too.
Built so that the factory Rothmans Porsche Rally Team could hit the international stage, the SC RS used the Turbo’s body with fibreglass bumpers and aluminium doors. In Autumn 1983, Porsche presents the 911 SC/RS for motor racing. The engine originates from the 911 SC, with improved performance achieved by the mechanical ball fuel injection, increased compression, the cylinder heads from the 935 and forged pistons. Racing seats are fitted in place of the standard seats.
Commemorating 25 years of Porsche sports car production, the 911S Silver Anniversary Edition is distinguished by unique Diamond Silver Metallic paint and a special black leatherette and tweed interior. The first of Porsche’s commemorative ‘celebration’ cars, this Silver Anniversary was produced in a limited run of 1,063 examples, of which approximately 500 are reported to have made their way to the United States.
Porsche made its first and most significant changes to the 930 for 1978 model year, enlarging the engine bore by 2 mm (0.08 in) to a total displacement of 3,299 cc (3.3 L; 201.3 cu in) and adding an air-to-air intercooler. The suspension benefitted from new anti-roll bars, firmer shocks and larger diameter rear torsion bars. While the increase in displacement increased power output and torque, it also increased the weight of the vehicle, which contributed to a substantial change in the handling and character of the car compared to the Earlier 3.0-Litre Models.
The base model Porsche 911, along with the 2.7 Liter 911S and Carrera 2.7, was introduced for the 1974 model year with many significant changes to meet legislative requirements around the world for both impact safety and emissions. It was available in Coupe and Targa variants, sporting engine Type 911/92 with K-Jetronic fuel injection, rated at 150 hp. For the 1975, the base model was discontinued in North America. ROW got Coupe and Targa variants, featuring engine Type 911/41 rated at 150 hp.
Essentially a Carrera 3.2 with a chopped, more steeply raked windscreen and hood, plus a stripped-out interior. Most had wide Turbo bodies. Porsche insisted that the simple hood was not designed to be 100 per cent watertight. The first Porsche 911 Speedster was built in 1989 and it was the last vehicle with the old 911 body. Three decades passed before the Speedster made a comeback. Had a 3.2 L Aircooled Flat 6 and 2274 were produced for the 1989 model year.
For 1989, Porsche produced the 25th Anniversary Special Edition model to mark the 25th year of 911 production. The 1989 Porsche brochure lists production of 500 U.S. market cars, of which 300 were coupés (240 in silver metallic paint and 60 in satin black metallic), and 200 cabriolet models (160 in silver and 40 in black). All had "silk grey" leather with black accent piping and silk grey velour carpeting. Includes small bronze "25th Anniversary Special Edition" badges.
Slantnosed and based on that of the 935 racecars, with pop-up headlamps. The front spoiler was made deeper in order to accommodate the extra oil cooler, while intakes in the rear wings fed air to the brakes. The larger turbocharger and four-outlet exhaust gave 30bhp of extra power. Porsche began their “special order program” offering a Flachbau option (Slantnose) for the 930 in very limited production. All of this at a cost of nearly 2 times the standard 930S.
The 911 Turbo was put into production in 1975. While the original purpose of the 911 Turbo was to gain homologation for the 1976 racing season, it quickly became popular among car enthusiasts. Ernst Fuhrmann adapted the turbo-technology originally developed for the 917/30 CAN-AM car and applied it to the 3.0 litre flat-six used in the Carrera RS 3.0, thus creating what Porsche internally dubbed as the 930. Total power output from the engine was 260 bhp and 254 ft lbs of torque.
The 911 SC effectively replaced the 911 S and was one of Porsche's first models that was meant for the international market. It was sold as a cheaper alternative to the 911 Turbo. The SC used an unblown version the 930 Turbo unit that offered 180 to 200 bhp depending on model year. Options included the rear whale tail, front chin spoiler, Bilstein dampers, 16 inch wheels with Pirelli P7 tires and sports seats. Sometimes dealers lumped these options together to create their own sport package. It was available as a Coupe and Targa from 1978 - 1983, while the Cabriolet version was only available in 1983.