Join The World's Fastest Growing Porsche Community >>
The base model Porsche 911, along with the 2.7 Liter 911S and Carrera 2.7, was introduced for the 1974 model year with many significant changes to meet legislative requirements around the world for both impact safety and emissions. It was available in Coupe and Targa variants, sporting engine Type 911/92 with K-Jetronic fuel injection, rated at 150 hp. For the 1975, the base model was discontinued in North America. ROW got Coupe and Targa variants, featuring engine Type 911/41 rated at 150 hp. Read More
The first road-going 911 Turbo was not the familiar 930 that entered production in February 1975. Nor was it the engine-less prototype that had appeared at the Paris Motor Show in October 1973. Instead, it was a one-off narrow-bodied mule that was subsequently gifted to Ferry Porsche’s sister, Louise, on her 70th birthday in August 1974. Built on chassis 9115600042, this 2.7 Carrera Turbo also pre-dated the prototype 930 that was shown in almost production-ready at Frankfurt show in 1974. Read More
1975 PORSCHE 911S SILVER ANNIVERSARY EDITION
Commemorating 25 years of Porsche sports car production, the 911S Silver Anniversary Edition is distinguished by unique Diamond Silver Metallic paint and a special black leatherette and tweed interior. The first of Porsche’s commemorative ‘celebration’ cars, this Silver Anniversary was produced in a limited run of 1,063 examples, of which approximately 500 are reported to have made their way to the United States. Read More
Essentially a Carrera 3.2 with a chopped, more steeply raked windscreen and hood, plus a stripped-out interior. Most had wide Turbo bodies. Porsche insisted that the simple hood was not designed to be 100 per cent watertight. The first Porsche 911 Speedster was built in 1989 and it was the last vehicle with the old 911 body. Three decades passed before the Speedster made a comeback. Had a 3.2 L Aircooled Flat 6 and 2274 were produced for the 1989 model year. Read More
In 1974, Porsche's performance version of the 911 was simply known as the 911 Carrera. It had new bumpers that complied to American regulations and the 2.7-liter engine from the Carrera RS 2.7. Other new features for 1974 included new seats, a full-width rear taillight. The Carrera deleted all the chrome off the car in favor of black window frames, wipers, doorhandles, but chrome could be ordered as an option. In 1976 Porsche replaced the Carrera with a new 3.0 liter variant. Read More
In 1974 Porsche offered a high performance fuel injected Carrera specifically for the European market. These were close to 2.7 RS specification and are often referred to as the 2.7 or Euro Carrera. In many regards, this car is similar to the 1973 2.7 RS in touring trim, with its 210bhp 911/83 engine, but the 2.7 Carrera is based on the updated G-series body and interior. Later Carreras that reach American shores used had reduced power and throttle response compared to Euro counterparts. Read More
For 1989, Porsche produced the 25th Anniversary Special Edition model to mark the 25th year of 911 production. The 1989 Porsche brochure lists production of 500 U.S. market cars, of which 300 were coupés (240 in silver metallic paint and 60 in satin black metallic), and 200 cabriolet models (160 in silver and 40 in black). All had "silk grey" leather with black accent piping and silk grey velour carpeting. Includes small bronze "25th Anniversary Special Edition" badges. Read More
As a successor to the Carrera 2.7 MFI, the Carrera 3.0 was fitted with a variation of the 930's engine without a Turbo. During its production period only 3,687 cars were made. The Carrera 3.0 was replaced by the Porsche 911 SC for model year 1978. Between 1976 and 1977, Porsche introduced the Carrera 3.0 with wide rear flares, optional whale-tail, and other luxury options. Built before the ‘911 SC’ it has everything the SC has, and more. It’s a different drive with more power @200bhp; more torque @188 ft/lb @4200rpm and it was 10% lighter too. Read More
Porsche introduced a new wide-body package option. Known as the M491 option it was commonly known as the "Turbo-Look". It gave the naturally aspirated cars the look and style of the 930 Turbo with wide wheel arches and the distinctive "tea tray" tail. It wasn't just about looks however, because M491 also got you the stiffer suspension shared with the Turbo and the superior Turbo braking system as well as the wider Turbo wheels. It was available on the Coupe, Cab and Targa. Read More
The replacement for the SC series came in 1984 as the 911 3.2 Carrera, reviving the Carrera name for the first time since 1977. This was the last iteration in the original 911 series, with all subsequent models featuring new body styling and new brake, electronic, and suspension technologies. Almost the same galvanised body as the SC. Engine was claimed to be 80 per cent new, and the first production 911 to feature an ECU to control the ignition and fuel systems. Read More
The 911 Carrera Club Sport was Porsche refocusing on what they do best – high performance, lightweight motoring. This is probably the most underrated Porsche ever made. Manufactured between August 1987 and September 1989 only 340 cars. It had a blueprinted, high revving engine mated to a modified short-shift, close-ratio G50 gearbox. It had track-bias suspension modifications too. Read More
In 1988, Porsche produced 875 examples of the CE or Commemorative Edition 911 Carrera in coupe, targa and cabriolet variants to mark the production of the 250,000th 911. Distinguishing features include special diamond blue metallic paint with color-matched Fuchs wheels, front and rear spoilers, and interior carpets and leather. These cars also featured Dr. Ferdinand Porsche's signature embroidered on the seats in the headrest area. Read More
Following the famous 1973 F-model 911 Carrera RS 2.7, Porsche built its successor based on the G-model and it was called the 911 Carrera RS 3.0. With its 172 kW engine, it was the most powerful series production street-legal Porsche made so far. With its new 3.0-liter engine, featuring mechanical fuel injection, it was capable of 230 hp. While 1,580 Carrera RS 2.7s were built for 1973, only 56 Carrera RS 3.0s were built for 1974. Read More
Porsche-911-Carrera-RSR-3.0
For the 1974 racing season 911 Carrera RSR 3.0 (246 kW) and RSR Turbo 2.1 (338+ kW) were created - the 3.0L for the customer teams and the 2.1 turbo for Porsche’s own team. The Carrera RSR 3.0 was made in small numbers for racing. The 3.0 RSR would go on to become the most successful Group 4 racing car of its time thanks to its combination of low weight, immense Porsche 917 brakes, impeccable handling, and a 330+hp naturally aspirated flat-6. Read More
For 1974 both the 911 Carrera RSR 3.0 and RSR Turbo 2.1 were created - the 3.0L for the customer teams and the 2.1 turbo for Porsche’s own team. The 911 Carrera RSR Turbo 2.1 developed 338-368 kW in power, but as the engine was small, the turbo lag was big and it wasn’t as easy to drive out of the corners as it was with the 3-litre normally aspirated car. Weight reduction measures included plastic hoods, fender flares and doors and an aluminium safety cage. Read More
Production of the second generation 911 started in August 1973. The 1974 model year G-series derivative replaced the outgoing 1973 model year F-series. Visually, the new 911 was given a major facelift and all three production variants now came with fuel-injected 2.7-litre engines. The entry level 911 had 150bhp, the mid-range 911 S offered 175bhp and the flagship 911 Carrera came with 210bhp. Once again, customers were given the choice of either Coupe or Targa body styles. Read More
Commemorating 25 years of Porsche sports car production, the 911S Silver Anniversary Edition is distinguished by unique Diamond Silver Metallic paint and a special black leatherette and tweed interior. The first of Porsche’s commemorative ‘celebration’ cars, this Silver Anniversary was produced in a limited run of 1,063 examples, of which approximately 500 are reported to have made their way to the United States. Read More
Röhrl and Geistdörfer very nearly won that San Remo Rally, after a comeback that would have been one for the ages. Röhrl and Geistdörfer were up against a field of faster, more powerful four-wheel-drive cars in their rear-wheel-drive Porsche 911 SC, and somehow managed to pull within an eyelash of victory. Unfortunately, a broken driveshaft forced the pair to retire, leaving Michele Mouton's Audi Quattro to run away with the race. Read More
The 911 SC effectively replaced the 911 S and was one of Porsche's first models that was meant for the international market. It was sold as a cheaper alternative to the 911 Turbo. The SC used an unblown version the 930 Turbo unit that offered 180 to 200 bhp depending on model year. Options included the rear whale tail, front chin spoiler, Bilstein dampers, 16 inch wheels with Pirelli P7 tires and sports seats. Sometimes dealers lumped these options together to create their own sport package. It was available as a Coupe and Targa from 1978 - 1983, while the Cabriolet version was only available in 1983. Read More
Become A Full Fledged Member
No Pesky Ads. Full Access to Featured Content. Awesome Discounts on Products