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Porsche 911 Type 993 - The Story

The Porsche 993 was manufactured and sold between January 1994 and early 1998 (model years 1995–1998 in the United States), replacing the 964. Its discontinuation marked the end of air-cooled 911 models. For many enthusiasts, this is the 911 pinnacle. We look into the story and details of this iconic Porsche 911 generation.

Porsche 911 (993) Model Timeline

Porsche 993 Model Guides

The 993 generation was the last in the line of the “classic” Porsche experience for many enthusiasts. The 993 had several variants, as its predecessors, varying in body style, engines, drivetrains, and included equipment. The Carrera was available in rear- and all-wheel drive versions. The Cabriolet, introduced simultaneously alongside the coupé in April 1994 for the 1995 model year, featured a fully electrical and hand-stitched soft top. Porsche also offered the 993 Carrera as an all-wheel drive version called the Carrera 4. The Targa version of the 993 was introduced in the 1996 model year and was the debut of the so-called "greenhouse" system. The 993 Turbo coupé was introduced in 1995. It featured a new twin-turbocharged engine displacing 3.6 liters and generating a maximum power output of more than 402 hp. During the second-to-last year of production of the 993 (1997), Porsche offered the 993 Turbo S, which was manufactured by Porsche Exclusiv department. The most interesting mainstream models introduced during the 993 generation was the Carrera 4 S (1996) and the later rear-wheel drive Carrera S (1997). They both shared the Turbo model's bodyshell, but housed the naturally aspirated engine in the rear. Both of the S models had slightly lowered suspension as compared to standard Carrera models.

Introduced in late 1994 the standard 911 Carrera of the 993 generation was fitted with a development of the M64 3.6-liter flat six that had been found in the prior 964 generation. With a redesigned exhaust system and new hydraulic lifters, the engine produced 272 horsepower. For the 1996 model year, a Targa variant was introduced, and a variable intake runner system (called VarioRam) was added to the entire Carrera lineup, bumping horsepower to 285. Approximately 23,000 coupes were built, 15,500 cabriolets, and 4,500 Targa's, in both manual and automatic (Tiptronic) transmission. Overlapping with the last year of production, it was replaced by the 911 Carrera of the 996 generation for model year 1998. Read More
Introduced in 1994 the Porsche 911 Cabriolet was more of a Grand Tourismo vehicle than a sports car. The 911 Cabrio featured the same cues as its coupe version, but with a few differences apart from the lack of a fixed roof, of course. The 3.6-liter engine was offered in two versions, with 275 hp and 285 hp. The latter featured the VarioCam system. Both versions were mated to either a 6-speed manual or a 4-speed automatic. Read More
The 993 Carrera 4, sold between 1995 and 1998, uses the same powerplant as the standard 993 Carrera, but puts power down to all four wheels through a 6-speed manual transmission. A “Carrera 4” badge on the tail, along with silver-painted brake calipers and clear front and side turn signals, help distinguish the all-wheel drive C4 from the C2 sibling. Approximately 4,700 coupes and 2,500 cabriolets were made. It was replaced by the Porsche 911 Carrera 4 (996 generation) in 1999. Read More
Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet (993)
2,500 cabriolets were made in the 993 Carrera 4. The 993 Carrera 4, sold between 1995 and 1998, uses the same powerplant as the standard 993 Carrera, but puts power down to all four wheels through a 6-speed manual transmission. A “Carrera 4” badge on the tail, along with silver-painted brake calipers and clear front and side turn signals, help distinguish the all-wheel drive C4 from the C2 sibling. Read More
After introducing the Porsche Carrera S with the body carried-over from the Turbo version, customers asked about an all-wheel-drive version for it. The 993 Carrera 4S was sold between 1995 to 1998. Much like the 993 Carrera S, the 993 Carrera 4S takes the 993 Carrera 4 powertrain and fits it into the widebody 993 Turbo shell, sporting 18" alloy wheels. The engine was the same 3.6-liter naturally aspirated, but it was offered in the higher power output of 285 hp. As with the Carrera 4, it was only available with a 6-speed manual transmission. The 4S did not have a cabriolet version. Read More
The Targa was the half-convertible bodywork offered by Porsche for the 911. By removing only a part of the roof and leave the closed-coupe rigid structure. It was offered a better sensation than a sunroof and it wasn't as heavy as a convertible. Unlike the previous Targa generation, the 993 featured a glass panel over the front passengers instead of a fabric one. The rest of the bodywork looked similar to the Carrera. The engine was a completely reworked flat-six, with a 3.6-liter displacement with the VarioCam system, which offered 285 hp. It was mated either with a 6-speed manual or a 4-speed automatic. Read More
The Carrera S was the ultimate, naturally aspirated version of the Carrera 2. Porsche decided to offer something more to its customers when it launched the Carrera S version. It featured a stiffer and lowered suspension. Its wider tires made it better in the corners and faster around a race-track than its Carrera 2 sibling. The Carrera S took its bodywork from the Porsche Turbo. But it didn't get the turbocharger or the all-wheel-drive system. Its wider rear fenders and lowered stance than the Carrera lineup made it a desirable car for the Porsche fans. The engine was the same 3.6-liter naturally aspirated, but it was offered in the higher power output of 285 hp. The only transmission available was a 6-speed manual. Read More
The 993 Turbo was available between late 1995 to 1998. Powered by a twin-turbocharged 3.6 liter flat six, it was rated at 402-horsepower. It’s distinguished easily from the rear, as the whale-tail spoiler is quite deep to house the intercoolers meant to cool the intake charge. This extra power might have been a handful for street drivers, so all-wheel drive from the 993 Carrera 4 added traction at all four corners. Approximately 6,000 coupes were made. Although powered by a different engine, a limited production 993 Turbo Cabriolet was available in the early days of the 993 generation. A more powerful 993 Turbo S was also introduced in 1997. Read More
The 993 Turbo S, available between 1997 and 1998, bumped the power from the standard 993 Turbo up to 450hp (430 for the United States market) with larger turbochargers and a modified engine management system. The Turbo S was fitted with more luxury trim bits on the interior – with more leather and carbon fiber than on the standard Turbo. A larger rear wing was installed as well. Only 345 were built. Its direct successor was the 996 Turbo S for model year 2005. Read More

Porsche 993 Special Models

Just like its predecessor, the 993 spawned a couple of higher-performance versions. There was the Carrera RS and the GT2. The latter was the first of its kind, kicking off a new twin-turbo flat-six era. The first GT2 was developed as a full-fledged race car for GT2 class racing, but Porsche also created a road-going version for homologation purposes. Powered by a twin-turbo 3.6-liter flat-six rated at 424 horsepower and 432 pound-feet (586 Nm) of torque, it was Porsche's most potent vehicle back then. In 1998, the output increased to an even more impressive 444 horses. The race-spec GT2 was the most radical incarnation of the 993 with its twin-turbo flat-six delivered 450 horsepower and was tweaked for endurance racing. Porsche also created a GT2 Evo version for GT1 class racing that was good for 600 horsepower. The most interesting special model in the 993 range is the 993 Turbo Cabriolet, a limited edition run that actually had a 993 body with 964 Turbo running gear. While the Turbo Cab was rare at 14 units, the 993 Speedster was the ultimate unicorn, with only two units ever produced. The 993 Carrera RS is a lightweight, stiffer version of the naturally-aspirated 993 Carrera meant for ultimate street performance. At its heart was the 3.8-liter normally aspirated Type M64/20 engine producing 300 bhp.

Porsche 911 Cup 3.8 (993) (1994 - 1998)
The 993 Carrera Cup 3.8 was developed from the 993 Carrera RS, as purpose-built competition car designed by Porsche for its single-model racing series taking place around the world. Replacing the 964 Carrera Cup, the 993 Carrera Cup had a claimed 315 bhp on tap, weighed only 1,100kg, and offered a top speed of around 270km/h (170mph). Approximately 216 samples were built. The Carrera Cup should not be confused witth the Carrera RSR, or the 993 Carrera RS Clubsport version. Read More
The racing sportscar is prepared by Porsche following the Le Mans GT2 regulations for the over 1,150 kg weight classification. It features a 3.6-litre engine with two turbo-chargers (KKK 24 with 33.8 mm restrictors), which delivers around 450 hp at 5,750 rpm. Even this racing vehicle, with its suspension featuring a McPherson front axle and Porsche multi-link rear axle with LSA system, closely resembles its production relative. Utilizing a steel 993 Twin Turbo chassis with modifications for racing, scored numerous victories in a wide variety of racing venues. Read More
The 993 Carrera RSR takes the 993 Carrera RS formula and makes it even more track-ready by adding a roll-cage and removing carpet, power windows, and a/c. There were just thirty Porsche 911 Cup 3.8 RSR (Type 993) race cars produced for the 1997 season. This model was the last of the breed of air-cooled, naturally-aspirated 911 race cars to come from the Weissach race department before the introduction of the Type 996 water-cooled cars. To find a 993 3.8 RSR that participated in some of the world’s toughest endurance races in period, and survived unscathed and unmolested, is quite rare. Read More
Porsche 993 Turbo Cabrio
The Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet (993 generation) is an incredibly rare car – only 14 were built in 1995, in the early days of 993 production. Rather than the contemporary twin-turbo powerplant in the 993 Turbo Coupe, the 993 Turbo Cab was fitted with the single turbo of the 964 Turbo 3.6. Although the Turbo Coupé was introduced earlier, the actual production started after the Turbo Cabriolets were sold. Turbo Cabriolets were 1995 models by VIN and Turbo Coupés were immediately produced as 1996 models although the 1996 model year had not yet started. Read More
Porsche faithful are probably shaking their heads right about now. Porsche never officially made a production 993 Speedster. Notice we said “production.” In 1995, the company created a dark green 993 Speedster for Ferdinand “Butzi” Porsche 60th birthday. Jerry Seinfeld apparently felt left out; he commissioned a silver 993 Speedster in 1998, though it seemed to have begun life as either a Targa or Cabriolet before being sent to Porsche Exclusive. Only two 993 Speedsters were ever made; if you see one that’s not silver or dark green, chances are it’s a phony. The rarest among these models is the 911 Speedster. Read More
The 993 Carrera RS is a lightweight, stiffer version of the naturally-aspirated 993 Carrera meant for ultimate street performance. At its heart was the 3.8-liter normally aspirated Type M64/20 engine producing 300 bhp at 6,500 rpm along with 262 foot-pounds of torque at 5,400 rpm. Looking to save as much weight as possible, every non-essential item from the car was removed. The Carrera RS tipped the scales at a 1,280 kg. About 1,000 Carrera RS were built, making it one of the rarest and most collectable 993-generation 911's produced. In addition to the Base Trim it was also available as the race-ready, street legal, RS Clubsport (option M003). Read More
The 993 Carrera RS Clubsport, 213 of which were built to meet the FIA GT2 homologation requirements, is a race-ready, although street legal variant of the 993 Carrera RS, not to be confused with the track only 993 Carrera Cup RSR. Emphasizing its competition credentials, the 993 Carrera RS Clubsport came with a welded-in roll cage as standard, considerably increasing its rigidity, racing bucket seats, six-point safety harnesses, battery isolator switch, fire extinguisher, and a huge fixed rear wing, the latter also available on the 'base model' Carrera RS. Read More
The Porsche 911 GT2 (or GT as it was initially called) from the 993 Porsche series was built in order to meet homologation requirements for the GT2 class racing which had banned all-wheel-drive vehicles by the mid 1990's. As a two-wheel drive vehicle, the GT2 had significant weight savings as compared to the standard 993 Turbo from Porsche, making it instantly competitive in racing. The 993 GT2's original 3.6 L (220 cu in) engine generated a maximum power output of 316 kW (430 PS; 424 hp). There was an update in 1998 that upped power to 450 bhp. Read More
Porsche 911 GT2 Clubsport (993)
The GT2 was the hardcore, race-focused version of the 993 Turbo, using essentially the same 3.6 L twin-turbocharged engine, but slightly modified with increased power output. The car was made to compete in the FIA GT2 racing class. Among this already very exclusive circle of 57 cars there is an even more rare community. 20 of the 57 road-legal cars were produced in a second – and last – badge with upgraded engine power (450 PS) called GT2 “Clubsport” which make them the last Porsche models with air-cooled engines. Read More
The Porsche 911 GT2 Evo represented the top specification ever produced for any air-cooled Porsche. Designed to compete in FIA GT1, it incorporated a twin turbocharged 3.6L flat-6 engine rated at a full 600 HP and 491 lb-ft of torque. As compared to the standard 993 GT2, Porsche widened the rear fender extensions to cover wider modular wheels and added a new front spoiler with inlets for oil and brake cooling. A second deck appeared on the already outlandish rear spoiler, which could be mounted higher in the air stream for added downforce. Approximately 11 samples were produced. Read More

Porsche 911 Type 993 Specs & Performance Summary


Porsche 911 Type 993 (1994-1998) Technical Specs

Forget the summary, here is every fourth generation Porsche 911 (Type 993) broken out by model year and variant and the technical specifications for each one. Car data nerds, let us unite.

Porsche 911 (993) Pictures, Galleries & Videos

The Porsche 911 (Type 993) was a revelation when it was first released. It was small, fun and relatively fast, a real upgrade versus the prior 964 generation 911. While finding original review videos is hard, we did uncover a few. More recently, as the Type 993 increases in value and nostalgia, we have found lots of new content and videos to share.

Porsche 911 (993) News & Updates

Recent auctions, awesome review videos and all the latest news and posts regarding anything to do with the Porsche 993.

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