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Commemorating 25 years of Porsche sports car production, the 911S Silver Anniversary Edition is distinguished by unique Diamond Silver Metallic paint and a special black leatherette and tweed interior. The first of Porsche’s commemorative ‘celebration’ cars, this Silver Anniversary was produced in a limited run of 1,063 examples, of which approximately 500 are reported to have made their way to the United States. Read More
For 1974 a 1.8-liter engine replaced the 1.7 and had a new type of electronic fuel injection called AFC (air flow control), or ‘L’ Jetronic. This same basic injection was used on 911s in the late-’80s. Unfortunately, due to emissions regulations, the 1.8 made just 76 hp, less than the smaller engine it replaced. The standard steel wheels were changed to 5.5-inch wide VW units. Rubber bumper guards now adorned the rear and the headlight surrounds were changed from white to black plastic. US cars got the infamous ignition seat-belt interlock buzzer. This was also the year of the limited edition series. Read More
The Cayenne Turbo facelift was introduced in 2014 as a 2015 MY. Think of it as an enhanced version of the non-facelifted version. It offered the same torque as the non-facelifted Cayenne Turbo S, but less power. Under the hood, the revised engine offered 20 hp more than its predecessor. The exterior of the 2015 Cayenne was enhanced with a sharper design and clear lines. The front fenders, the grille, and the headlights were entirely new, with LEDs. Read More
In recognition of the 50th Anniversary of the Porsche Club of America (PCA), Porsche has created an exclusive 911 Carrera' S Coupe model featuring a distinctive exterior color, unique interior styling and commemorative touches, and a more powerful and higher performing engine. Limited to an exclusive production run of just 50 cars initially made available to eligible PCA members, the 911 Club Coupe was unveiled this past weekend at PCA's 50th Annual Porsche Parade in Hershey, Pa. Read More
The 997 Sport Classic is a limited edition version of the 997.2 Carrera S coupé inspired by the 1973 Carrera RS 2.7. The engine is rated at 413 PS (304 kW; 407 hp) and features a newly developed resonance intake manifold with 6 vacuum-controlled switching flaps. It includes a 6-speed manual transmission, double-dome roof (informally called double bubble roof), 44 mm (1.7 in) wider rear fenders, SportDesign front apron with a front spoiler and a fixed 'duck tail' rear wing. Only 256 were made. Read More
911 Carrera 4 GTS
Ultimately, the Carrera 4 GTS is the ideal all-round 911. Its bag of tricks gives you accessible, astonishing performance on the right road – but its price tag and comfort levels make it a little more acceptable for everyday use than a GT2, GT3 or Turbo. The GTS scores particularly well on the practicality to performance ratio. Its rear seats can accommodate people and its all-wheel drive system means you can really use this car all-year round. The GTS-spec 3.0-litre flat-six develops 30bhp more than a Carrera S (at 444bhp) and 37lb ft more torque (at 406lb ft). Read More
The 992-era 911 GT3 confirms that Porsche is prepared to go to astonishing lengths to keep the hardcore faithful happy. The engine is a naturally aspirated 4.0-litre that revs to 9,000 rm and has little in common with the unit found elsewhere in the 992 range and a lot to do with the one in the GT3 Cup car. Power is up a modest 10bhp to 503 bhp, torque to 347 ft lbs. That’s more than enough. It’ll accelerate to 62mph in 3.4 seconds. It is the best sports car on the planet. Read More
In 2013, a small team from Weissach developed a tribute to the 1970 Le Mans winner. The concept utilizes adaptive aerodynamics with Salzburg livery like the original. Carbon Fibre skin, carbon fibre Monocoque and a turbocharged eight-cylinder engine with up to 1,000 PS provides the power. The front and rear suspension are based on 918 components, utilizing motorsport-inspired linkages and pushrods. Read More
Just a few months after the introduction of the 2004 911 (997 series), the convertible version was released. The release of the 997 911 Carrera Cabriolet marked the first time since 1977 that Porsche has given the convertible 911s the same engines as their Coupe siblings. The base 997 Carrera Cabriolet gets the 3.6-liter flat six-cylinder engine with 321 bhp and 273 ft lbs of torque. The convertible version for both Carrera and Carrera S was developed at the same time with the coupe. Read More
The absolute highlight of this new generation is the world debut of the Cayenne S Hybrid with its technically highly sophisticated parallel full hybrid drive and fuel consumption in the New European Driving Cycle of just 8.2 litres/100 kilometres (equal to 34.4 mpg imp), which means CO2 emissions of just 193 g/km. The Cayenne S Hybrid therefore combines the performance of an eight-cylinder with the economy of a six-cylinder running on much less fuel. Read More
Similar to the 911 T, the 718 Cayman T is not the fastest, most luxurious or even the cheapest of all the 718 variants. However, the car is a unique combination of features and nuances that add up to more than the sum of its parts. The T-wins are the perfect car for somebody who knows exactly what they want, and wants nothing more than that - the purist’s car. The Cayman T is equipped with the base-model 718’s mid-mounted 2.0L flat-four turbocharged engine, which produces 296 bhp @ 6500 rpm and 280 ft lbs of torque. The Sport Chrono package is included as standard. Read More
The 1961 Porsche RS was one of the last Spyders made by Porsche that used the potent 4-cam engine. It was a successor to the 1960 RS60 which was a highly developed version of the original 550 RS Spyder. These diminutive racecars excelled on the tighter courses like the Targa Florio which was first won by Porsche in 1956. That victory marked the first time a sports car with a midship engine had won a major motor sports event. Read More
Porsche 944 Swiss Special (1984)
The Swiss Special 944 was a very limited edition 944 Special produced in 1984. Only 200 944 Swiss Specials were produced and it was largely a design exercise, with several upgrades to the normal 944. The changes included, Red-colored stickers on the back of "Porsche” “944", Special size teledial rims, Seats , rear bench and door panels in 924 Carrera GT fabric and dashboard plastic parts in black instead of the standard silver. Read More
Searching for more muscle? The 718 Cayman S got a new 2.5L turbocharged boxer 4-cylinder. Power comes in at 345 bhp @ 6500 rpm and torque is a really strong 310 ft lbs @ 1900 rpm. For reference, the outgoing 981 Cayman S had 311 bhp and 265 ft lbs of torque. While we hate the drone of the turbo four cylinder, there is absolutely no doubt that is much more powerful and that performance numbers are much stronger. 0 – 60 mph is over in just 4.0 seconds and the quarter mile is finished in 11.9 seconds flat. Much faster than the outgoing model. But is it as engaging? No. Read More
Like the 917 LH of 1969 and 1970, the 1971 version was also made for one race only - the 24 hours of Le Mans. The 917 LH-70 had already proved that the body was excellent for Le Mans, so the aerodynamical modifications for 1971 were mild. The front was modified and the rear wheels were covered. The 917 LH-70 that scored 2nd at the 1970 Le Mans 24H (chassis 917-043) was modified for the Le Mans 1971. Read More
Porsche expanded its mid-engine range with the new two-seater Porsche 718 Boxster GTS and Porsche 718 Cayman GTS. The vehicles' power has now been increased to 269 kw (365 hp) thanks to a newly developed intake duct and an optimised turbocharger for the 2.5-litre, four-cylinder boxer engine. With these improvements, the engine delivers 11 kW (15 hp) more power than the 718 S model and up to 26 kW (35 hp) more power than its GTS predecessor models with naturally aspirated engines. The new mid-engine sports cars are available with manual six-speed transmission or optional PDK Read More
The Porsche 953 ranks as one of the finest off-roaders Porsche has ever made. It was basically a souped-up 911 designed specially to give Porsche an advantage in the 1984 Paris–Dakar Rally. Just a year later, it was replaced by the 959. Despite its brief run, it still managed to make quite the impression. Built around a massively enhanced suspension and a supremely powerful 300 bhp (224 kW), 6-cylinder engine, it showed Porsche knew more than just sportscars. Read More
In 1988, Porsche produced a two-door called the 969, based upon the bodystyling of the 911. Intended as the successor to the Porsche 930, the car did not get past the prototype stage. Porsche intended to create a more powerful, range topping model, based loosely upon the 911. The 969 was to feature a hugely powerful twin-turbocharged engine, and was to pick up where the Porsche 959 left off, using much of the supercar's technology. Read More
Because the traditional pre-test is cancelled in 1981, Porsche is forced to start at Le Mans without testing. None the less, the race ends successfully: Jacky Ickx and Derek Bell win almost an hour ahead of the second placed competitor – right in time for the 50th anniversary of Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG, and 30 years after Porsche’s first start at Le Mans. Read More
This is the open-top model for those who don’t want the full convertible experience – and it’s only available in the wide-hipped four-wheel drive bodyshell. The new Targa is a striking design, echoing the 1965 original with its fixed rollover bar. The Targa 4S, gets you the more powerful 3.8 engine from the Carrera S. It mixes regular Carrera 4S go with a sense of style and everyday usability (those occasional rear seats, the real possibility of 30mpg in everyday driving). Great car. Read More
Porsche 928 GTS Guide
The last evolutionary stage of the 928 model featured flared rear wings, a red light panel at the rear, a rear wing painted in exterior colour, exterior mirrors in the Cup design plus 17" Cup rims as standard. The 5.4-litre engine of the GTS generated 350 hp. The 928 GTS came for sale in late 1991 as a 1992 model in Europe and in spring of 1992 as an early 1993 model in North America. Changed bodywork, larger front brakes and a new, more powerful 5.4 L engine were the big changes. Read More
If you're not one for celebrating special models that don't improve performance, this 2023 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS Cabriolet America will be right up your alley. Porsche has gone beyond just slapping on some new paint, unique trim, and special wheels. There is some performance to go along with the history behind the America name-plated Porsche, besides the incredibly long name. Read More
Homologated roadgoing version of the ’97 911 GT1 Evolution racer costing $890,805 upon release. Twin-turbochargers were fitted to the M96/80 engine, which had water-cooled cylinder heads. Apparent from the front and rear lights, the GT1 shares many components with its series production counterparts, but puts them together in a more competitive way. Gone is the rear engine layout which isn't suitable for prototype GT racing, the GT1's turbocharged flat-six engine sits in front of the rear axle and is supported by chassis tubes instead of the typical 911 rear sub frame.  Read More
The 996 GT3 R was a one-year-only (2000 model year) special of which only 63 were produced. The car took the basic GT3 bones and amplified it for motorsport. The Mezger engine produced over 400 horsepower, while factory-fitted adjustable shock absorbers gave better handling. Most notably, the GT3 R wore carbon-fiber bodywork meant for ultimate light weight in motorsport. The 996 GT3 R was introduced in 1999 as a replacement for the 993 RSR. Before its introduction, it was extensively tested at Weissach and Paul Ricard. In the 2000 FIA GT Championship, the 996 GT3 R was in the N-GT class and won every run. Won the 24-hour race at the Nürburgring.  Read More
The European market asked for a diesel engine and the car-maker had to deliver it to keep the sale up in a struggled market affected by the world financial crisis. The engine was a carry-over from the Audi line-up, with a variable turbocharger system and a 3.0-liter displacement. It offered 240 hp and it was tuned to offer more performance. For instance, at hard accelerations, the system disengaged the AC compressor until the engine reached 2500 rpm. Read More
The Panamera GTS was more like a detuned Turbo than an upgraded 4S. Its outside look was on a par with the Panamera Turbo, with large air intakes on the front and standard front section from the SportDesign package, that emphasized the sporty dynamics. On the front, the bi-xenon headlights had black inner bezels and featured four LED daytime running lights. In the rear, there was the same adaptive spoiler that deployed at speeds above 205 kph (121 mph). Read More
Slantnosed and based on that of the 935 racecars, with pop-up headlamps. The front spoiler was made deeper in order to accommodate the extra oil cooler, while intakes in the rear wings fed air to the brakes. The larger turbocharger and four-outlet exhaust gave 30bhp of extra power. Porsche began their “special order program” offering a Flachbau option (Slantnose) for the 930 in very limited production. All of this at a cost of nearly 2 times the standard 930S. Read More
The idea for 959 was born as early as 1983 when this so-called Guppe B prototype was displayed at Frankfurt Motor Show. While there were glimpses of the contemporary 911 in the Gruppe B – the wheelbase, the roofline, the windows and doors, much of the interior – in truth the new model had little in common with Porsche’s perennial sports car. The production 959 ended up being launched in 1987. Read More
The Panamera Hybrid models have their strengths, but there is still nothing quite like the visceral experience behind the wheel of a high-performance vehicle with a formidable internal combustion engine, a formidable unit like the V8 found in the Panamera GTS (short for 'Gran Turismo Sport). It plays a significant role in portraying the character of the sports sedan as a lively performance and yet, family-friendly vehicle. Read More
Designed as a grand tourer, the Porsche Carrera 4 Cabriolet was the base all-wheel-drive version for the open-top 911 range in 2001. It offered enough comfort to be used as a daily driver, on all weather. The 996 Porsche was facelifted in 2002. Along with the coupe versions, the convertibles were reshaped also. There was not a big difference on the outside. It was the same sports-car and open-top grand tourer. The Carrera 4 Cabriolet, continued on through 2004, receiving the same updates as the Carrera, including the 3.6-liter engine. Read More
Porsche Cayenne Turbo (2002 - 2007)
The first-generation Cayenne Turbo 955 has 450 PS (331 kW), and can accelerate from 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 5.3 seconds. Under the hood, the Cayenne Turbo was fitted with a turbocharged 4.5-liter V8 unit mated to a standard 6-speed automatic. Thanks to the standard air-suspension, the Turbo version could get up to 28 cm (11”) of ground clearance. The German brand needed a car to sell in volumes and save them from a foreseeable financial collapse. The Cayenne Turbo did just that. Read More
The Porsche 911E continued as the midrange 911 for the 1970 and 1971 model years, fitting between the contemporaneous 2.2L 911T and the 2.2L 911S. It produced 155 bhp and featured all the upgrades that came with C-Series production including longer wheelbase, Fuchs alloy wheels. Both the E and S model 911 had an aluminium engine-lid and aluminium bumpers. The 911 E 2.2 was once again available as either a Coupe or Targa body. For model year 1972, the 2.2L 911E was replaced by the 2.4L 911E. Read More
From the outside, the 356A kept to the Porsche mantra of stepwise evolution. The new model was outwardly identical to the previous version except for the wider tires, a small rub-strip below the doors, a fully-curved front window and enamel paint replacing lacquer previously used. The 356 A came with an all-alloy air-cooled Flat 4 engine in four states of tune, with the 1300 having Type 506/2 engine with 44 bhp and 60 lb-ft. Read More
The Turismo Panamera models offer more practicality than the sedans, with the wagon body style offering valuable additional cargo space. However, there's also plenty of performance on offer. Take the Panamera 4S Sport Turismo, for example. It boasts a total of 1,384 litres with the rear seats folded, ideal for a weekend shopping trip. However, under the hood lies a potent engine in the form of a turbocharged V6 unit. Read More
The 2014 Panamera lineup was given a great refresh. The base engine, installed in the Panamera 4 version, was an upgraded version of the previously used 3.6-liter V6. For the 2013 model year, it was mated exclusively with a 7-speed (PDK – dual-clutch) automatic gearbox and the 6-speed manual was dropped. It also gained some extra horses. The power of the V6 engine in the Panamera increased ten hp (eight kW) to 306 bhp @ 6200 rpm and 295 ft lbs @ 3750 rpm of torque. Read More
Porsche Carrera GT
Porsche's open-top, 603-hp, manually shifted Carrera GT makes other supercars seem quaint. It is arguably the best supercar ever made. Under the skin, the car used many modern hallmarks of motor sport engineering: a carbon fiber chassis, dry sump lubrication, inboard suspension and a mid-mounted engine that was engineered to sit as low as possible to ground. Performance on paper and in person was spectacular. Peak supercar. Read More
Porsche 917/20 Le Mans
An attempt to blend the best aerodynamic characteristics from both the short-tailed 917 K and long-tailed 917 LH led to the the 917/20, otherwise known as the Pink Pig. The car's combination of a long body, stubby face, and wide hips gave it a pig-like look, which inspired Porsche designer Anatole Lapine to give the car a pink paint job with butcher cut lines covering the exterior. It was hugely popular at the 1971 Le Mans race, and was the fastest in qualifying and nearly came in fifth place, before a brake failure caused it to crash before the finish line. Read More
Matt Prior from Autocar nails the 991.2 GT3 RS: “While I don’t think the 3 communicates any better than a 2, the messages it does transmit are superior: you can feel that it’s lighter, more willing to turn, easier and more satisfying to ease onto the throttle and keep it pinned. It’s why this car is only a few seconds slower than a 2RS around the Nürburgring Nordschleife despite being almost 200bhp down.” He goes on... “And in the form of the GT3 RS it goes into creating - little by little, detail by detail - what might just be the best driver’s car currently on sale.” Read More
For those who want more extreme performance, handling and track-day bragging rights, the RS is it. It's far from practical and may be too extreme for some, especially on the street, but on track it is exceptional. Only marginally quicker than the 991 GT3 that it is based on, but it delivers that performance with a different character. Massive grip, massive downforce and more extreme than the GT3. It delivers 80 per cent of the downforce of the full-on GT3 R race car, and with a carbon fibre bonnet and wings, a magnesium roof and polycarbonate rear windows and screen, it’s also light, weighing in at just 1,420kg. Read More
The 964 based Speedster was the 1994 Speedster which was based on the 964 Carrera 2 platform. There are far fewer 1994 911 Speedsters in the world than the 1989 model, with production reportedly totaled only around 936 units, less than half as many as the 1989 example. Whereas the 1989 Speedster was primarily an aesthetic package, the 964 version sought a happy medium between the regular Carrera 2 and the hardcore Carrera RS. It had the same engine as the base Carrera and didn’t have the same suspension bits as the RS. Read More
The Porsche factory had 93 Turbo chassis left. These were all transferred to Porsche Exclusiv and hand built as the very special 964 Turbo 3.6 S. They were offered with normal, or ‘Flachbau’ slant nose front ends. While the vast majority of Turbo S’ were fitted with the ‘Flachbau’ nose as a no-cost option, the Turbo S could also be had with the traditional 964 nose as well. In all, 76 Flatnose cars were made while 17 non-Flatnose (known as Package option) cars were made. These cars were also fitted with the X88 option, which increased power to 380 hp. 75 flatnose units were produced. Read More
Introduced in 1969, the three-litre 908/2 is an evolution of the Porsche 908K Coupe. As the rule book for the season no longer required a minimum windscreen height nor the requirement to run a spare wheel, Porsche opted for a much lighter Spyder body; which looked like a chopped version of the short-tail Coupe used in 1968. The Spyder body was perfectly suited for high downforce races like the Nürburgring 1000 km and the Targa Florio. It was also about 100 kg lighter than the Coupe. Read More
Porsche expanded the Panamera family with the addition of a new body version: The Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo. The Panamera 4 got the Sport Turismo treatment. The Panamera 4 Sport Turismos gets the same all-wheel drive system and underlying mechanicals. That means, it gets the base Panamera's 330-hp turbocharged 3.0-liter V-6. Porsche doesn't call the Sport Turismo a station wagon, but that's kinda sorta what it is. Read More
The base Porsche 944 coupe was built between 1982 and 1989, essentially the same platform as the Porsche 924 (there was some overlap as the 924 was produced till 1988). The 944 was intended to last into the 1990s, but major revisions planned for a 944 S3 model were eventually rolled into the Porsche 968 instead, which replaced the 944. Read More
The two most powerful and fastest mid-engine sports models from Porsche are ready and raring to go: with uprated engines and excellent PASM chassis the Boxster GTS and Cayman GTS set new benchmarks for sportiness in their segment. 3.4 L naturally aspirated flat 6 is good for 330 hp. Sport Chrono package is standard. This means that in conjunction with the optional Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK) and the active Sport Plus button, the Boxster GTS sprints from 0-100 km/h in 4.7 seconds. Read More
The GT3 R has always been placed between the GT3 Cup and the very expensive RSR. All the 991.2 racing cars have normally aspirated 4-litre engines. Compared to the 991.1 GT3 R, the 991.2 GT3 R engine offers a broader usable rev range and the engine response is more precise due to 6 throttle butterflies. The roof, front hood and fairing, wheel arches, doors, side and tail sections, rear lid and interior trim are made of carbon-fibre reinforced plastic. Gets new double wishbone suspension. Read More
In May 2011, Porsche unveiled the diesel version for its four-door Panamera. With the introduction of that version, it switched from a road runner to a long cruiser luxury sports-sedan. Porsche didn't want to lose that market and decided to offer a diesel version for the Panamera. Since the car was designed for long travels, a diesel engine would give it a range of over 1200 km (746 miles). After the initial shock of its regular customers, soon the orders started to pick-up. Read More
While the first generation Boxster S was received with mixed feelings, the second generation was praised. With the introduction of the 718 Boxster, the car-maker showed a special commitment to the smallest member of the Porsche family and it arguably become the best sports car in the world. The Boxster S featured a 2.5-liter flat-four engine. It was turbocharged and with direct fuel injection and was good for 345 hp. Performance was up a lot, especially in the midrange, now that torque was 310 ft lbs. It helped rocket the Boxster S from zero to 60 mph in just 4.0 seconds and onto a top speed of 177mph. Read More
The second generation of the Porsche Cayenne was launched at the 2010 Geneva Motor Show. It was a big improvement over its predecessor and featured an evolved design. For the engine, the Cayenne Turbo featured a 4.8-liter V8 unit which offered 500 hp. For the transmission, the 2010 Cayenne lost the low-range transfer case. The standard transmission was an 8-speed Tiptronic gearbox. All-wheel drive was installed standard as well. Other new improvements led to a decrease in the overall weight by 180 kg (400 lbs). Read More
Ferry Porsche had in fact requested Swiss technicians to make a less sporty and more elegant version of the 365 B and thus the 1600 Beutler Coupè was born. This project is a 2+2 based on a Porsche 1600. Like the Porsche, the car is built on a VW platform, but includes Porsche elements such as the brakes and the engine. It was built in 5 copies before production was stopped in 1957 due to a change in commercial strategies by the German company. Read More
The Porsche Panamera Turbo got an update at the same time as the rest of the Panamera lineup for the 2014 model year. The 2014 Panamera Turbo got the same twin-turbo 4.8-liter V8 unit but now with more power. Power was 520 hp instead of 500 hp and it was coupled to the same 7-speed (PDK – double-clutch) automatic gearbox as before, but with a different final drive ratio. The Turbo was fitted with the PTM (Porsche Traction Management) all-wheel-drive system. With the Porsche Chrono Package, the car received an extra boost when needed. Read More
For 2009, engine power is distributed to all four wheels via the same electronically controlled Porsche Traction Management system found previously only on the Porsche Turbo. The electronic controls respond to driving conditions even more instantaneously than the previously used hydraulically activated all-wheel drive system. The Carrera 4S model, with a 3.8-litre engine developing 355 bhp, can go from 0 to 60 mph in 4.5 seconds and has a top speed of 185 mph. Read More
Porsche 944 Callaway (1983)
In 1983, American tuning company Callaway Cars began offering a turbocharged package for the US-Spec 944 in collaboration with Porsche. The standard 2.5 L inline-four engine was not suitable for forced induction because of the higher compression ratio of 9.5:1 which made the engine prone to failure when subject to forced induction along with the complex Bosch Motronic engine management system. Read More
The 718 Porsche Cayman GT4 is everything you could possibly want in a sports car. The sublime combination of a legendary chassis and naturally aspirated 6-cylinder Porsche engine is accentuated by the emphasis that less is more when done right - and nobody does this better than Porsche’s GT division. No one will make the argument that these are objectively inexpensive cars, but for those in the market for an introductory dose of supercar sensory-overload, the GT4 checks all the boxes, and then some. Need a track car and daily driver in one package? Then the 718 Cayman GT4 may be the car for you. An absolute blast. Read More
The 2022 Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet is a formidable beast. The new Turbo S comes with an all-new, 3.8 liter boxer six with two variable turbine geometry (VTG) turbochargers. The power output is a staggering 640 hp and 590 lbs-ft of torque. In keeping with previous Turbo models, the engine powers all four wheels. A new 8 speed automatic transmission with a manual mode manages the power, and can power the car to 60 mph in a hair under a claimed 2.7 seconds. Read More
Production of the second generation 911 started in August 1973. The 1974 model year G-series derivative replaced the outgoing 1973 model year F-series. Visually, the new 911 was given a major facelift and all three production variants now came with fuel-injected 2.7-litre engines. The entry level 911 had 150bhp, the mid-range 911 S offered 175bhp and the flagship 911 Carrera came with 210bhp. Once again, customers were given the choice of either Coupe or Targa body styles. Read More
The Porsche Mobil 1 Supercup features the Porsche 911 GT3 Cup, the world’s best-selling race car. For this season, it’s the new generation. 510 hp, optimised intake manifold, electronic gearshift and power steering, fully digital cockpit, larger rear wing, and a double-wishbone front axle. This is a meaningfully upgraded race car. The new 911 GT3 Cup is taking on a great legacy. And it has already proven itself! Read More
The Panamera 4S Executive is just a 'stretched-out' version of the regular Panamera sedan. The wheelbase has been lengthened by as much as 15 centimetres, an increase that mostly benefits the rear passengers. The Panamera 4S Executive sits above the Panamera 4 Executive, and they share several similarities, such as the panoramic sunroof, heated rear seats and power sunblind in the rear. Style-wise, the Panamera 4S Executive also boasts silver accents around the fenders and side skirts. Read More
The Porsche 911 GT2 Evo represented the top specification ever produced for any air-cooled Porsche. Designed to compete in FIA GT1, it incorporated a twin turbocharged 3.6L flat-6 engine rated at a full 600 HP and 491 lb-ft of torque. As compared to the standard 993 GT2, Porsche widened the rear fender extensions to cover wider modular wheels and added a new front spoiler with inlets for oil and brake cooling. A second deck appeared on the already outlandish rear spoiler, which could be mounted higher in the air stream for added downforce. Approximately 11 samples were produced. Read More
GTP cars were produced in 1980, three of which were special LeMans race cars. The cars had the 2.0L turbocharged 924 engine with a huge front-mounted intercooler and increased boost to increase output to 320 HP and 285 lbs/ft of torque. The engine used Bosch mechanical fuel injection and with a weight of 2050 pounds had a top speed of 180 mph. It was third in the GTP class, with an 6th place finish overall, and another finished fifth in class and 12th overall. Read More
Porsche has also decided to gift the GTS a more distinct and dynamic personality that can’t be duplicated via the Carrera S’s options list (even if you could get the engine, which you cannot). The downside is that the price has gone up too and ticking a few more options boxes can get the Carrera 4 GTS Cabriolet into 911 Turbo territory price-wise. In the engine department, the 3-litre twin turbo flat six develop 473 bhp and 420 ft lbs. Read More
A single car - the 911 GT1-98 Straßenversion - was built in 1998 to homologate the all-new racing version under the new FIA regulations. The engine had to be slightly de-tuned to meet European emissions laws, although its 400 kW (544 PS; 536 hp) at 7,200 rpm and 600 N⋅m (443 lb⋅ft) of torque at 4,250 rpm proved to be more than adequate; the car could accelerate to 100 km/h (62 mph) from a standstill in 3.6 seconds on its way to a top speed of 193 mph. Read More
The cylinder number and position (six, horizontal) remained the same as before, but the displacement has been reduced to 3.0 liters (from 3.4 liters) and a pair of turbos has been strapped on the engine. And thanks to the force-feeding’s high potential, the same 3.0-liter unit is used for the Carrera S as well (instead of the 3.8-liter flat-six). As a result, the power figures in the Carrera 2 Cabriolet gained 20 hp and some 40 lb-ft of torque vs the prior generation. More importantly, the turbocharging makes the Carrera’s 332 foot-pounds of torque available way quicker, from just 1,700 rpm. Read More
The Type 964 911 first launch with an all wheel drive model. It was a serious investment by Porsche in updating the chassis and tech platform. The 964 Carrera 4 was powered by the M64/01 3.6 liter flat six engine, developing 250 bhp and 229 ft/lbs of torque. The objective of the C4’s all-wheel-drive system was not only to provide improved traction but also better handling, especially in the wet and on slippery surfaces. The system sends power front/back in a 31:69 ratio because a 50:50 split would have made the 964 feel like a front-wheel-drive car. Read More
An exclusive limited edition Cayenne GTS “Porsche Design Edition 3”. Limited to just 1,000 units worldwide, the limited edition Cayenne adds equipment and Porsche Design styling touches to stand out from the crowd. Distinguishing the special edition model is a Lava Grey paint scheme, extended roof spoiler, racing stripes, and 21in alloy wheels in a matching anthracite finish. This special edition looks the goods, but sadly there were no mechanical changes to differentiate it from the core GTS. Read More
For the 997.2 generation, power from the 3.6-liter Carrera engine was increased to 345 hp while the Carrera S saw 385 horsepower from its 3.8-liter flat-six. Power was sent to the rear wheels via a standard manual box but for the first time, the 997.2 saw the introduction of the dual-clutch PDK as an option. The chassis remains largely unchanged, with slightly modified springs and dampers. The sports suspension is replaced with a variable, electronically controlled sports suspension based on the active PASM suspension. The sweet spot in the used car market at the moment. Read More
After introducing the Porsche Carrera S with the body carried-over from the Turbo version, customers asked about an all-wheel-drive version for it. The 993 Carrera 4S was sold between 1995 to 1998. Much like the 993 Carrera S, the 993 Carrera 4S takes the 993 Carrera 4 powertrain and fits it into the widebody 993 Turbo shell, sporting 18" alloy wheels. The engine was the same 3.6-liter naturally aspirated, but it was offered in the higher power output of 285 hp. As with the Carrera 4, it was only available with a 6-speed manual transmission. The 4S did not have a cabriolet version. Read More
The 2008 model year marks the launch of updated Porsche Cayenne. With a striking new face that features a dramatic new headlight design and with a wide and muscular new body accented by broad wheel arches, the 2008 Porsche Cayenne's newly sculpted sheetmetal provides vivid visual testimony to the vehicle's enhanced technical features. Inside, the interior has received an important update with new infotainment unit, new gauges and more. Read More
The engine is the same 3.0-litre, twin-turbocharged flat-six petrol engine as in the 911 Carrera S, but it has been fettled to produce 473 bhp. The GTS also has a bespoke suspension set-up that sits 10mm lower than the standard 911, and that's true no matter whether you choose two- or four-wheel drive. Most of the time, there's absolutely no difference between the standard GTS and the all-wheel-drive version. But when you need it, the AWD Carrera 4 GTS will save you. Read More
Porsche 908/01 LH Coupé
The FIA’s new three-liter prototype (Group 6) and five-liter sports car (Group 4) regulations adopted for 1968 presented the opportunity for Porsche to update its 907, which had won races but lost the championship. In came a 2997 cc flat-eight engined 908. Despite its aero appearance, it was no easy car to drive fast, weaving as speeds approached 200 mph. Despite winning the 1000km Nürburgring, the 908 was anything but convincing in 1968. Read More
Porsche 718/2 F2
In 1959 Porsche unveiled the prototype of a narrow, open-wheeled car called the Porsche 718/2 that married the 718's mechanicals with a more traditional single-seat Formula body. For 1960 the production 718/2, starting with chassis number 718201, received revised bodywork, a 6-speed transaxle, and a wheelbase extended by 100 mm. A total of five cars were built. Some of these four-cylinder cars were later raced in F1 under the 1962 1½ litre formula. Read More
On 5 November 2009, Porsche officially announced the Boxster Spyder, which was the lightest Porsche on the market at the time, weighing 1,275 kg , 80 kg lighter than a Boxster S. This was achieved through the elimination of the conventional soft top's operating mechanism, the radio/PCM unit, door handles, air conditioning, storage compartments, cup holders and large LED light modules on the front fascia, although some of these could be re-added to the car in the form of options. Weight saving was also gained using aluminum doors, an aluminum rear deck and the lightest 19-inch wheels. Read More
The 1961 4-cylinder special Spyder is the car that became the 1962 8-cylinder W-RS Spyder. It started during the 1961 racing season, when three special 718 racing cars were created for the factory team. Two of those special cars were built as coupés and one as a Spyder - with chassis number 718-047. For the 1962 season, the car got some changes and became known as the Porsche 718/8 W-RS Spyder. Out went the four cylinder and in came an eight-cylinder engine from the Porsche F1 race car (enlarged to 2 liters). Read More
Porsche made things more interesting with the launch of a Turbo S version in 2006 to compete with the Mercedes-Benz ML 63 AMG. The Turbo S is powered by a twin-turbocharged 4.5 L V8 that produces 521 PS (383 kW; 514 hp) and 720 N⋅m (530 lb⋅ft) of torque; Acceleration from 0–60 mph (97 km/h) takes 5.0 seconds and the top speed is 171 mph (275 km/h); It features a six-speed automatic Tiptronic transmission. Read More
Porsche 919 Street Concept
The Porsche 919 Street is a supercar concept, designed and built by Porsche in 2017, based on the highly successful Porsche 919 Hybrid LMP1 race car. The dimensions and basic design elements of the 919 Street are the same as that of the race car. However the 919 Street instead has a less-pronounced wing and more street-car comforts. This is the one we wish they made. Alas, the 900 HP LMP1-Based road-ready rocket that never was. Read More
Even more powerful, faster and more dynamic than ever before, the updated 997 Porsche 911 GT3 (differentiated from the earlier with a new 997.2 designation) is about to prove its enhanced potential. The Porsche 911 GT3 now reaches an even higher standard in its two main qualities: power and driving dynamics. The naturally-aspirated six-cylinder now increased in size to 3.8 litres is 435 bhp (320 kW), up 20 bhp over the previous model. In particular, the flat-six power unit carefully upgraded for even more muscle and performance offers a significant increase in torque at medium engine speeds. Road performance is spectacular. Read More
In the case of the 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet that begins with a larger, more potent six-cylinder engine. The Carrera 4S is powered by a 3.8-liter flat six that produces 355 horsepower and 295 lb.-ft. of torque. The roughly ten percent increase in power translates to improved acceleration and higher top track speed. The 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet with the six-speed manual gearbox races from a stop to 60 mph in only 4.7 seconds, topping out at the track at 185 mph. When carrying the optional Tiptronic S transmission, the zero to 60 mph sprint takes a mere 4.5 seconds. Read More
While all 356 Carreras are rare and desirable cars, the 1961 B Carrera GT is a very special animal indeed. Built from lightweight materials and sporting Porsche’s most powerful racing engine of the time, they were in a different league to the most highly specified road car that the Stuttgart factory then produced. Porsche produced only 49 of the 356B Carrera versions for 1960/61 and all were coupes. Many were painted Silver. Read More
With 750-horsepower, launch control and gravel mode in a family-friendly wagon, this may be the most practical car on the planet. Take the screaming fast all-electric Taycan Turbo S—the fastest, most powerful version atop the Taycan range—and make it a wagon with a little more ground clearance (0.78 inches) and more headroom (3.62 inches) in the rear seats, and you have the Taycan Turbo S Cross Turismo. The all-wheel-drive Taycan Turbo S Cross Turismo has one electric motor per axle, with a one-speed transmission up front and a two-speed transmission in the rear. Read More
The original Porsche Boxster was a huge success and help Porsche grow its customer base, so when the second-generation Boxster (987) came to the US market as a 2005 model it wasn’t a surprise that it followed a similar formula. While the 987 Boxster retained only 20 per cent of the 986’s DNA, it looked similar enough to us that it felt more like a mild refresh than a totally new model update. The engine and transmissions were, for the most part, carry-overs, albeit with the obligatory and customary modest bump in performance and power (now at 240 horsepower). Read More
In 2008, the second generation of the Boxster received new technologies and more power. It reached almost the same power as the former Boxster S, from the first generation. The 2.9-liter unit replaced the older 2.7-liter engine and offered 10 hp more than the older engine. It was paired as standard to a 6-speed manual, and a 7-speed PDK (Porsche dual-clutch) automatic was available as an option. The outside gets some welcome design tweaks also, while on the inside we get some updates and more technology options. Read More
In 1999, Porsche celebrated the turn of the century with a special edition – the 996 "Millennium Edition". The 911 Millennium edition was based on the Carrera 4 coupé and was pretty rare, with only 911 cars made. Based on the Carrera 4, the "Millennium Edition" was limited to 911 examples and was based exclusively on the wide bodied Carrera 4. This special edition was finished in Violet Chromaflair paint, which, depending on the light changes from dark violet to light green and is quite spectacular to look at. It also got a caramel-colored leather interior and polished "turbo-twist" wheels. Read More
In 1953 Porsche created a series of 550 prototypes and 550-03 became the most important car in Porsche history by winning the 1954 Carrera Panamerica with Hans Herrmann at the wheel. This singular victory lent the Carrera nameplate to future models and also marked the first international victory of a mid-engine car. Only 15 prototypes were made until regular production began in 1954 of the Porsche RS Spyder. Read More
In 1950, eleven remaining Gmund chassis were assembled after the factory returned to Germany and converted to SL (Sport Leicht) racing specification. They received 1,086-cc engines, enlarged fuel tanks, louvered quarter-window covers, wheel spats, streamlined aluminum belly fairings, and a pedestal-mounted shifter. Three Type 356/2 cars raced at Le Mans in 1951; two crashed, but 356/2-063 performed flawlessly, winning the 1,100-cc class. Read More
The first road-going 911 Turbo was not the familiar 930 that entered production in February 1975. Nor was it the engine-less prototype that had appeared at the Paris Motor Show in October 1973. Instead, it was a one-off narrow-bodied mule that was subsequently gifted to Ferry Porsche’s sister, Louise, on her 70th birthday in August 1974. Built on chassis 9115600042, this 2.7 Carrera Turbo also pre-dated the prototype 930 that was shown in almost production-ready at Frankfurt show in 1974. Read More
Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 (2011)
The Porsche 997 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 is an update to the 997 GT3 R Hybrid. Compared to its predecessor, which debuted in 2010, the 2011 second-generation hybrid is 20 percent lighter and more efficient without any concession to lap times. While sharing the same paint scheme, the new vehicle is easily identified by its lack of intakes in front of each rear wheel - changes to engine cooling allowed the slats to be dropped and aerodynamic efficiency improved. It gets a traditional race-bred flat six engine. The GT3 R Hybrid has a completely independent second driveline in the front of the chassis, a clever and complex hybrid electric set up that rockets it from standstill to 60 mph in just 2.5 seconds. Read More
The third generation of the Porsche Cayenne was unveiled in August 2017. In 2022, the Cayenne added the Platinum Edition to the SUV and coupe body styles. The Platinum Edition Cayenne applies a coat of Satin Platinum paint to a number of the vehicle's badges, as well as its fascia-mounted intake treatment and its distinct 21-inch wheels. Black exhaust tips and window trim add an extra hint of menace to the model. Read More
Although the longtail 917 was introduced first, it was meant only for the Le Mans. This meant, the short tail 917 K ("Kurz" in German for short) was raced first. The only engine available in 1969 was the 4.5-litre flat 12. The factory team enters one 917 K also for the Nürburgring 1000 km race, where it scores 8th. The factory team would not enter 917 K for racing anymore in the season, only private teams will. Read More
The Porsche 914 was first shown at the 1969 Frankfurt Auto Show was, as intended, a true conglomeration. The front suspension was largely derived from the 911 with some VW components, and the interior was a blend of both companies' parts bins. The initial engine offering was Volkswagen's 80-hp fuel-injected 1.7 liter flat four, while the 914/6 had a twin-carburetor 2.0-liter Porsche flat six tuned for 125 hp. Read More
The Cabriolet version of the 991.2 Turbo got the same updates as its coupe sibling. The engine in the 991.2 911 Turbo Cabriolet is a twin-turbocharged flat-six with 540 horsepower and 523 pound-feet of torque, up a decent 20 more horses versus the 991.1 Turbo Cab. Improvements that come from increases in boost and fuel-injection pressures. Rounding the skidpad, the Turbo posts 1.02 g’s relatively easily. The wide P Zeros in back and the standard four-wheel steering conspire to hide the fact that 62 percent of the Turbo’s 3656 pounds sits over the rear wheels. 0 - 60 mph is over in just 3 seconds. Read More
Based on the 911 GT3 RS production sports car, Porsche has designed a customer sport race car for GT3 series around the world: The 911 GT3 R. In developing the more than 368 kW (500 hp) racing nine-eleven, special attention was paid to lightweight design, better aerodynamic efficiency, reducing consumption, improved handling and optimised safety. The 911 GT3 R features the distinctive double-bubble roof, and the wheelbase which had been lengthened compared to the prior generation. Read More
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