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With the Turbo S, the PDCC Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control hydraulic roll bars came as standard. The PCCB Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes had been standard on the Turbo S already since the 996 generation. New options included the radar-based lane change assist and a lift system for the front axle (increased ground clearance by 1.6″/40 mm). The PCM now had a multi-touch screen like in the facelifted 991 Carrera. Routes and places could be visualized with 360-degree images and satellite images. Engine gets more horsepower too, now with 572 bhp and 553 ft lbs of torque.
Designed as a grand tourer, the Porsche Carrera 4 Cabriolet was the base all-wheel-drive version for the open-top 911 range in 2001. It offered enough comfort to be used as a daily driver, on all weather. The 996 Porsche was facelifted in 2002. Along with the coupe versions, the convertibles were reshaped also. There was not a big difference on the outside. It was the same sports-car and open-top grand tourer. The Carrera 4 Cabriolet, continued on through 2004, receiving the same updates as the Carrera, including the 3.6-liter engine.
In 1978, the works team fields two 911 SC at the East African Safari Rally. The name of game is to survive 5,000 kilometres of the toughest tracks in sweltering heat and torrential rain. The conditions take their toll: of the 72 starters, 13 reach the finish line. Martini Racing Porsche System Engineering signs on two specialists to drive: Sweden’s Björn Waldegård (Start No. 5) and Kenyan Vic Preston Jnr (Start No. 14).
The 964 Carrera RS 3.8 was produced as a base for homologation for the venerable 3.8 RSR. It was unveiled in 1993 and produced in a very small series by Porsche’s Racing Department in Weissach-Flacht, and was an extreme evolution of the 964 Carrera RS that was released two years prior. It featured the wide-body look of the Type 964 Turbo, a massive rear spoiler, and three-piece “Speedline for Porsche” wheels with 235/40 and 285/35 tires, making it distinctively more aggressive in appearance than the fairly restrained styling of the Carrera RS of 1992 and capable of providing significantly more mechanical grip.
The 2012 Carrera 4S Cabriolet had the same wider rear track when compared to the non-S version of the vehicle. It wasn't something everyone would notice, but the difference was there for a reason, and that reason was the wider tires installed. From behind, a rear red light-strip united the LED taillights. Inside the Carrera 4S Cabriolet, there were some luxury features. The leather-covered sport-bucket seats were covered in leather. Even the rear, unusable, seats were wrapped in leather. The center console was higher to give a sense of a single-seat racing roadster.
Porsche 993 Turbo Cabrio
The Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet (993 generation) is an incredibly rare car – only 14 were built in 1995, in the early days of 993 production. Rather than the contemporary twin-turbo powerplant in the 993 Turbo Coupe, the 993 Turbo Cab was fitted with the single turbo of the 964 Turbo 3.6. Although the Turbo Coupé was introduced earlier, the actual production started after the Turbo Cabriolets were sold. Turbo Cabriolets were 1995 models by VIN and Turbo Coupés were immediately produced as 1996 models although the 1996 model year had not yet started.
Porsche 911 Type 964 Carrera 2 'Works Turbo Look' Cabriolet was a special model in the 964 lineup. It gave buyers of the Carrera 2 Cab the great wide look of the Turbo cars and the Carrera 2 engine. The model was available as a 1992 and 1993 model year car (while some argue it was also available for a while in 1994). You get body shape of the 964 Turbo 3.3 without the huge rear spoiler. But this was more than just a design exercise, because the the Turbo-Look models also got the chassis and braking system from the Turbo 3.3 too. 
The 911 Targa received the same upgrades during the switchover to the 997.2 generation, including a boost in power and performance. The expansive glass roof now featured increased UV protection. This is the point in Porsche 911 Targa history when the model re-established itself as the perfect halfway measure between a true coupe and a convertible. Porsche engineered a wildly complex power-retracting center roof piece and left the rear glass fixed in place. Beyond this fabulous roof mechanism, it’s the same Carrera 4.
Just a few months after the introduction of the 2004 911 (997 series), the convertible version was released. The release of the 997 911 Carrera Cabriolet marked the first time since 1977 that Porsche has given the convertible 911s the same engines as their Coupe siblings. The base 997 Carrera Cabriolet gets the 3.6-liter flat six-cylinder engine with 321 bhp and 273 ft lbs of torque. The convertible version for both Carrera and Carrera S was developed at the same time with the coupe.
It's not often Porsche creates an all-new model in their 911 lineup. But the 997 Carrera GTS is just that. It's faster, more powerful and better looking than any other model in the Carrera family. However it's still a little less hardcore than the 911 GT3, and a lot cheaper than the 911 Turbo. The Porsche 911 Carrera GTS features a 3.8 litre flat-six engine which is tuned to develop 408 horsepower, that's 23 hp more than the Carrera S manages. Think of it as the perfectly optioned Carrera S for less money.
Porsche will only build 30 examples of the Clubsport 25. Mechanically, it's similar to the regular GT2 RS Clubsport. It makes the 691 horsepower from a twin-turbocharged 3.8-liter flat-six. But it gets many, many changes to the exterior and even the cooling system. As you can clearly see, the body has been lengthened, and it has also been widened. The latter is necessary to house the wide, low-offset 18-inch wheels taken from the Porsche 935, though without the aerodynamic covers.
Porsche made a lightweight version of the Turbo simply known as the Tuubo S. This used the spartan appointments of the Carrera RS with an upgraded version of the Turbo engine. Some cars received graphics on the side celebrating IMSA Supercar Championship. Similar to the Carrera RS, the Turbo S had no power steering, air conditioning, airbags, central locking, alarm system, rear window wiper, smaller window washer reservoir, smaller horn, and had thin-gauge glass. The engine used a second oil cooler and slightly higher boost to improve overall performance.
The Porsche 911 GT2 (or GT as it was initially called) from the 993 Porsche series was built in order to meet homologation requirements for the GT2 class racing which had banned all-wheel-drive vehicles by the mid 1990's. As a two-wheel drive vehicle, the GT2 had significant weight savings as compared to the standard 993 Turbo from Porsche, making it instantly competitive in racing. The 993 GT2's original 3.6 L (220 cu in) engine generated a maximum power output of 316 kW (430 PS; 424 hp). There was an update in 1998 that upped power to 450 bhp.
Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet (964)
The Carrera 4 model also launched with a Cabriolet version in 1989 (for 1990 model year). The new 911 generation is introduced in Autumn 1988, but the convertible was not launched until the model year 1990. Alterations to the body include the bumpers and sill tread plates, and the 911 continues to be equipped with an automatically retractable rear spoiler and a cowled underbody. The braking system is fitted with ABS. The 911 (Type 964) also features power-assisted steering for the first time. Like the Coupe, the Cabriolet got the new all-wheel drive system.
Based on the already primal 997.2 GT3, the RS gets another 15 hp from the 3.8-liter flat-six for a total of 450, or more than 118 hp per liter. A racing machine tamed for street use, the GT3 RS is hardly just about horsepower. It gets a wider track, it weighs less, and it produces more downforce than the GT3. The only available transmission is a six-speed manual gearbox (with the ratios even shorter than the GT3). A racing machine tamed for street use, the GT3 RS also gets a wider track, it weighs less, and it produces more downforce than the GT3.
The Cabriolet version of the 991.2 Turbo got the same updates as its coupe sibling. The engine in the 991.2 911 Turbo Cabriolet is a twin-turbocharged flat-six with 540 horsepower and 523 pound-feet of torque, up a decent 20 more horses versus the 991.1 Turbo Cab. Improvements that come from increases in boost and fuel-injection pressures. Rounding the skidpad, the Turbo posts 1.02 g’s relatively easily. The wide P Zeros in back and the standard four-wheel steering conspire to hide the fact that 62 percent of the Turbo’s 3656 pounds sits over the rear wheels. 0 - 60 mph is over in just 3 seconds.
Also produced for the 1976 "model year", for the U.S. market, was the 912E, a 4-cylinder version of the 911 like the 912 that had last been produced in 1969. It used the I-series chassis and the 2.0 Volkswagen engine from the Porsche 914. In all, 2092 units were produced. In 1976, the Porsche 924 took this car's place for the 1977 "model year" and beyond. The power was supplied by a 4-cylinder high-performance fuel injection motor also used in the Volkswagen 411.
911 Carrera Black Edition
The 2016 Carrera and Boxster Black Editions add some extra niceties for a value-adjusted price. And as the names suggest, both cars come in any color scheme you want so long as it’s, yes, black on black. Or black on black on black in the case of the ragtops. Available in coupe and convertible forms, with rear- or all-wheel drive, each powered by the base 350-hp 3.4-liter flat-6 engine, the 911 Carrera Black Edition adds other design treats too.
The 996 Carrera 4S Cabriolet is the convertible version of the slightly-uprated 996 Carrera 4. Introduced a year after the 996 C4S Coupe. The Carrera 4S Cabriolet was introduced in the lineup with the new engine and the Turbo bodywork. The cabriolet version of the Carrera 4S paired the aggressive bodywork and suspension of the Turbo with the base Carrera 4 drivetrain, though it didn't get the Turbo's huge rear wing. The three-layer canvas-top was powered and it needed 20 seconds to completely retract or cover the car, at speeds up to 50 kph (31 mph). For winter, the car featured an aluminum hard-top.
911 Carrera 4 GTS
Ultimately, the Carrera 4 GTS is the ideal all-round 911. Its bag of tricks gives you accessible, astonishing performance on the right road – but its price tag and comfort levels make it a little more acceptable for everyday use than a GT2, GT3 or Turbo. The GTS scores particularly well on the practicality to performance ratio. Its rear seats can accommodate people and its all-wheel drive system means you can really use this car all-year round. The GTS-spec 3.0-litre flat-six develops 30bhp more than a Carrera S (at 444bhp) and 37lb ft more torque (at 406lb ft).
The 991.2 Targa did get some mild design changes, but they are all inline with the rest of the 991.2 changes. Despite the mild styling revisions, it’s a dramatically different car in terms of its engine. The iconic and highly regarded naturally aspirated 3.4-litre flat-six engine has been ousted for a more environmentally friendly twin-turbocharged 3.0-litre. It keeps its all-wheel drive system and is still an all-weather 911. A sports car with all-wheel drive is the first choice for more than one in three Porsche 911 buyers. It is sporty and comfortable, the turbo engines more powerful and consume less, with the improved all-wheel drive.
The 996 series was a monumental update to the 911 story. The Type 996 introduced water-cooled engines and it also ushered in a new body design. The roof line with a windscreen which is around five degrees flatter gives the side view a more fluid look. Gone was the "classic" 911 design, the entire main body now much sleeker. The flat six in the Carrera 996 was a newly-developed flat-six engine that offered 300 hp. It was mated as standard with a six-speed manual. A 5-speed automatic (Tiptronic) with manual override to shift gears was on the options list. As always, the Carrera 2 was rear-wheel-drive.
Porsche’s 911 GT2 RS is a brute, a lightweight, twin-turbocharged, 620-hp bout of madness that stemmed from Stuttgart’s quest to see how high up the sports-car ladder the 911 could punch. It is the most serious roadgoing Porsche ever. The engine is a port-injected, 3.6-liter flat-six from the Le Mans–winning GT1 race car of the late ’90s, with a pair of variable-geometry turbochargers huffing a maximum of 23.2 psi of boost into the combustion chambers. The result is 620 hp at 6500 rpm and 516 lb-ft of torque at 2250. It gets a six-speed manual gearbox and rear-drive only. Yikes.
The 996 was initially available in a coupé or a cabriolet (Convertible) bodystyle with rear-wheel drive, and later with four-wheel drive, utilising a 3.4 litre flat-6 engine generating a maximum power output of 221 kW (300 PS; 296 hp).[7] The 996 had the same front end as the entry-level Boxster. After requests from the Carrera owners about their premium cars looking like a "lower priced car that looked just like theirs did", Porsche redesigned the headlamps of the Carrera in 2002. With the cabriolet, buyers have a choice between this version and the hotter Carrera 4S cabriolet.
This car was officially called as the 911 GT2 RS Clubsport, but the name is rather misleading. The car was not built for the GT2 racing class which is long extinct and club sport has stood for Porsche club track days while this non-streel-legal car is a real racing car. Finally, the car was based on the 991 GT2 RS, which already had the Clubsport version. So, in order to understand what is what, we call it "991 GT2 RS Clubsport racing version". The 991 GT2 RS engine with 515 kW was powerful enough, so it was not tuned.
Porsche 911 Speedster (Turbo-Look) (964)
In contrast to the 911 Speedster from the 1989 model year, the 964 Speedster was only offered and produced with the narrow body shape. In December 1991, the first wide bodied prototype based on a 964 Carrera 2 Convertible Turbo-Look was registered at Porsche AG, but it never made it ready for a series production. In response to recurring customer requests for Turbo-Look Speedsters - the optical characteristics of the wide body in combination with the flat windscreen and fiberglass cover had found many fans - Porsche converted the previously individually ordered, narrow Speedster in the exclusive department.
Porsche 911 Carrera RSR 2.8
Introduced in 1973, the RSR was a factory-built racing car based on the 911 chassis. The Porsche 911 Carrera RSR 2.8 was the first 911 to ever wear the RSR badge. Homologated for racing by the iconic 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS, the RSR’s racing career got off to the perfect start thanks to Brumos Racing’s overall triumph in the 1973 24 Hours of Daytona, while a factory car won the latest ever Targa Florio road race. For the privateer in the mid-1970s who wanted to go sports car racing this was the chosen weapon.
Built so that the factory Rothmans Porsche Rally Team could hit the international stage, the SC RS used the Turbo’s body with fibreglass bumpers and aluminium doors. In Autumn 1983, Porsche presents the 911 SC/RS for motor racing. The engine originates from the 911 SC, with improved performance achieved by the mechanical ball fuel injection, increased compression, the cylinder heads from the 935 and forged pistons. Racing seats are fitted in place of the standard seats.
The 996 GT3 R was a one-year-only (2000 model year) special of which only 63 were produced. The car took the basic GT3 bones and amplified it for motorsport. The Mezger engine produced over 400 horsepower, while factory-fitted adjustable shock absorbers gave better handling. Most notably, the GT3 R wore carbon-fiber bodywork meant for ultimate light weight in motorsport. The 996 GT3 R was introduced in 1999 as a replacement for the 993 RSR. Before its introduction, it was extensively tested at Weissach and Paul Ricard. In the 2000 FIA GT Championship, the 996 GT3 R was in the N-GT class and won every run. Won the 24-hour race at the Nürburgring. 
Features like Porsche’s active suspension and the new-for-992 “wet mode” are standard on the Carrera 4 variants, but the electronically controlled limited slip rear differential (standard on the 4S), as well as ceramic composite brakes (cast iron rotors are standard). The current 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet is equipped with PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management). The twin-turbo flat-six has 379 hp and 331 ft lbs of torque.
The 992-era 911 GT3 confirms that Porsche is prepared to go to astonishing lengths to keep the hardcore faithful happy. The engine is a naturally aspirated 4.0-litre that revs to 9,000 rm and has little in common with the unit found elsewhere in the 992 range and a lot to do with the one in the GT3 Cup car. Power is up a modest 10bhp to 503 bhp, torque to 347 ft lbs. That’s more than enough. It’ll accelerate to 62mph in 3.4 seconds. It is the best sports car on the planet.
For race teams and track day customers Porsche prepared a small number of the 964 Cup cars according to the FIA NG-T regulations. Officially called the Competition model, these custom-ordered cars were an intermediary step between the Carrera Cup option (M001) and the standard tourer (M002). This M0003 option was available directly from Porsche as a road-going model. These cars had almost all the Carrera Cup modifications including the new suspension. This lowered the car by 40mm in the rear and 50mm in the front. It also included fitting of the larger 930 Turbo disc brakes and adjustable anti-roll bars.
The 911 SC effectively replaced the 911 S and was one of Porsche's first models that was meant for the international market. It was sold as a cheaper alternative to the 911 Turbo. The SC used an unblown version the 930 Turbo unit that offered 180 to 200 bhp depending on model year. Options included the rear whale tail, front chin spoiler, Bilstein dampers, 16 inch wheels with Pirelli P7 tires and sports seats. Sometimes dealers lumped these options together to create their own sport package. It was available as a Coupe and Targa from 1978 - 1983, while the Cabriolet version was only available in 1983.
The 911 Carrera Club Sport was Porsche refocusing on what they do best – high performance, lightweight motoring. This is probably the most underrated Porsche ever made. Manufactured between August 1987 and September 1989 only 340 cars. It had a blueprinted, high revving engine mated to a modified short-shift, close-ratio G50 gearbox. It had track-bias suspension modifications too.
Porsche purists might moan that the flat-six engine in the rear is no longer naturally aspirated, but with more power and torque, improved efficiency and some advanced interior tech giving this 911 an even bigger breadth of ability than before, this facelifted 991-generation model carries on where the old car left off. Sure, it’s lost a touch of that high rev zing from the old car, but if you add the sports exhaust, the bark from the engine inside and out is still intoxicating. And so is the speed. The 991.2 Carrera S is absolutely amazing on both road and track and still the best sports car around.
Porsche 911 Carrera GTS Cabriolet (991.2)
Porsche really has hit its brief with the turbocharged Carrera GTS Cabriolet. It is hugely capable on the road, easy to live with on a daily basis, and come the weekend, it’s massively fast on track. For the money, and for drivers who really want just a little more 911, but without the mind-bending speed of a Turbo or uncompromising nature of a GT3, then this is the car for you. It also looks unique and has enough of its own style that it it feels special both on the outside and inside.
Like the standard 4S, the Targa 4S produces 443 bhp @ 6500 rpm from a six-cylinder, 3.0-litre boxer engine with twin turbochargers, and puts it to the road via an eight-speed PDK and Stuttgart's refined all-wheel-drive system. 390 ft lbs from as low as 2300 rpm also means you have tons of mid-range power on tap for any situation. Compared to the previous generation Targa 4S, the new model is up 23 hp and 22 ft lbs of torque. 
Slantnosed and based on that of the 935 racecars, with pop-up headlamps. The front spoiler was made deeper in order to accommodate the extra oil cooler, while intakes in the rear wings fed air to the brakes. The larger turbocharger and four-outlet exhaust gave 30bhp of extra power. Porsche began their “special order program” offering a Flachbau option (Slantnose) for the 930 in very limited production. All of this at a cost of nearly 2 times the standard 930S.
In 2002, all of the standard models received a minor makeover in 2002 which included Turbo-style headlights, a freshly designed front clip and an increase in engine capacity to 3.6L along with a subsequent 20HP boost. The bodies were more rigid which further improved handling and safety and the lower, stiffer X74 suspension became available as a factory modification. From the outside, it was hard to notice the difference between the 1998 version and the facelifted model. The main difference was on the headlights. Including the Mk 1 cars, the 996 Carrera Coupe sold 46,317 units.
Röhrl and Geistdörfer very nearly won that San Remo Rally, after a comeback that would have been one for the ages. Röhrl and Geistdörfer were up against a field of faster, more powerful four-wheel-drive cars in their rear-wheel-drive Porsche 911 SC, and somehow managed to pull within an eyelash of victory. Unfortunately, a broken driveshaft forced the pair to retire, leaving Michele Mouton's Audi Quattro to run away with the race.
Porsche 911 Turbo S2 (964) (1992)
A forgotten part of the 964s history is the Turbo S2. It was built to adhere to homologation rules so Porsche could participate in IMSA's sports car racing series. IMSA's homologation rules meant that Porsche had to build at least 200 road-going versions of the participating car, 20 of which needed to share most of the primary components of the race car. The 911 Turbo S2 was built specifically for this purpose and exclusively for the United States and Canada. The 20 homologation specials left the factory as stock 964 Turbos, heading immediately to California-based tuner for "S2" engine upgrades.
The 991.2 911 Targa 4S is powered by the latest water-cooled 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged flat-six from Porsche, producing 420 hp and 368 lb-ft of torque. It can be optioned with a PDK seven-speed dual-clutch automatic (a seven-speed manual is standard) and all-wheel drive is standard. Whereas the two earlier generations of Targas were little more than 911 Carreras with large glass sunroofs, the 991-series Targa nailed the look and feel of the original.
Porsche has also decided to gift the GTS a more distinct and dynamic personality that can’t be duplicated via the Carrera S’s options list (even if you could get the engine, which you cannot). The downside is that the price has gone up too and ticking a few more options boxes can get the Carrera 4 GTS Cabriolet into 911 Turbo territory price-wise. In the engine department, the 3-litre twin turbo flat six develop 473 bhp and 420 ft lbs.
It would be a disservice to call this new Turbo a "lesser" car than the Turbo S, but it does have less in most departments. Less power at 573 HP. Less features compared to the jam-packed Turbo S. Most importantly, less money required to put one in your garage. This also is not to say that the new Turbo isn't anything short of a monster. It will still go 0 to 60 in 2.8 seconds, will corner like it was on rails with Porsche Torque Management (PTM) all-wheel-drive.
The open-top 991 Carrera S Cabriolet requires an $11,600 premium over a comparable coupe; ta not-cheap $108,950 price point for those shopping. For that, you get the best overall open-top sports car around. With the 400-hp, 3.8-liter six and the benefit of the PDK automatic’s launch control, the Carrera S cabriolet should hit 60 mph in 3.8 seconds and cover the quarter-mile in the low 12s. Performance is on-par with the coupe on backroads so any fears that this is a soft-911 are thrown out the window. This is a serious sports car, sans roof.
The 997 Carrera S was the first step up in performance over the base 997 Carrera. Available over two distinct generations, the 997.1 Carrera S used a 3.8-liter engine producing 355hp – the available X51 Powerkit bumped that number to 376hp. From 2009 onwards, the 997.2 Carrera S offered 380hp from 3.8 liters. Besides a more powerful engine, it also comes standard with 19 inch wheels, larger brakes, and a lowered suspension with PASM.
The original 1973 Carrera RS was available in Europe but not in the USA. Porsche decided to build the 1993 Carrera RS both to European spec and a limited number in compliance with US regulations. These US spec cars were assigned the name “RS America”. The intent was to create a basic lightweight, no frills 911 with minimal luxury options. The standard US Carrera 2 brakes, engine and gearbox were used. The RS weighed 2,945 pounds so it was almost 80 pounds lighter than a standard Carrera 2. 
Towards the end of the 996 production run, Porsche introduced the Turbo S, boasting even more power than the standard 996 Turbo — 450 PS (331 kW) and 620 N·m (457 lb·ftf)— courtesy of the X50 package being standard. The Turbo S was limited to approximately 1,500 units worldwide, of which 598 were coupé (hardtop) and 960 were cabriolet (convertible). It was available with a 6-speed manual or an automatic (Tiptronic S) transmission, driving power to all four wheels. The basic price is EUR 122,500 for the Turbo S Coupé or EUR 131,100 for the Turbo S Convertible. Sprints from zero to 200 km/h in 13.6 seconds.
The engine is the same 3.0-litre, twin-turbocharged flat-six petrol engine as in the 911 Carrera S, but it has been fettled to produce 473 bhp. The GTS also has a bespoke suspension set-up that sits 10mm lower than the standard 911, and that's true no matter whether you choose two- or four-wheel drive. Most of the time, there's absolutely no difference between the standard GTS and the all-wheel-drive version. But when you need it, the AWD Carrera 4 GTS will save you.
In 1974 Porsche offered a high performance fuel injected Carrera specifically for the European market. These were close to 2.7 RS specification and are often referred to as the 2.7 or Euro Carrera. In many regards, this car is similar to the 1973 2.7 RS in touring trim, with its 210bhp 911/83 engine, but the 2.7 Carrera is based on the updated G-series body and interior. Later Carreras that reach American shores used had reduced power and throttle response compared to Euro counterparts.
The Carrera 4 Cabriolet gets that wonderful extra-wide body and an AWD system hooked up to its new turbocharged 3.0-liter flat-six engine. Additionally, the Carrera 4 Cabriolet gets a spate of new goodies, including a unique taillight section, and an updated infotainment system that brings the sports car’s connectivity to a whole new level. The open top Carrera 4 does a great job as an all-rounder, giving drivers the all-weather assurance of all-wheel drive and combining it with open top driving fun. Dynamically, it is up there with its coupe sibling.
The GTS coupe starts with the wider Carrera 4 body, with the rear fenders pushed out 1.7 inches, and the rear track widened 1.6in. Up front is the new SportDesign front fascia with its lower front spoiler and larger cooling air intakes. Standard wheels are 20-inch center lock items and 0.5 inch wider than standard Carrera S rims, finished in satin black. There are splashes of black elsewhere, too. The changes run more than skin deep. Bigger turbos pump up to 18psi of boost pressure which helps deliver not only 30 extra horses at 6,500 rpm, but 405 lb-ft of torque between 2,150 rpm and 5,000 rpm, up from 368 lb-ft. This is the sweet spot.
Arguably the most extreme 911 to be build as a production car for the road and track. The most significant improvements made to the RS—over both the 992 GT3 and the previous-gen 991 GT3 RS—were applied to the aerodynamics and chassis departments of the car. The new 911 GT3 RS is even more optimized for track use than its predecessors. The spontaneously responsive, high-revving four-litre, six-cylinder boxer engine has proven ideal for use at track days and club sport events.
Of all the 1580 Carrera RS 2.7s, only 200 were made were ordered with this lightweight ‘Sports’ trim which made the car more responsive and purposeful. In many ways these few cars were the ultimate road-going Porsche of the 1970s. Known as the Sports, Lightweight or even the M471 option code, these cars had improved the power-to-weight ratio. Reports of 75kg were stripped from the standard model by fitting lightweight body panels and lightweight glass.
After introducing the Porsche Carrera S with the body carried-over from the Turbo version, customers asked about an all-wheel-drive version for it. The 993 Carrera 4S was sold between 1995 to 1998. Much like the 993 Carrera S, the 993 Carrera 4S takes the 993 Carrera 4 powertrain and fits it into the widebody 993 Turbo shell, sporting 18" alloy wheels. The engine was the same 3.6-liter naturally aspirated, but it was offered in the higher power output of 285 hp. As with the Carrera 4, it was only available with a 6-speed manual transmission. The 4S did not have a cabriolet version.
The Type 964 911 first launch with an all wheel drive model. It was a serious investment by Porsche in updating the chassis and tech platform. The 964 Carrera 4 was powered by the M64/01 3.6 liter flat six engine, developing 250 bhp and 229 ft/lbs of torque. The objective of the C4’s all-wheel-drive system was not only to provide improved traction but also better handling, especially in the wet and on slippery surfaces. The system sends power front/back in a 31:69 ratio because a 50:50 split would have made the 964 feel like a front-wheel-drive car.
The first generation of the Porsche 911 begins in late 1964 and goes through 1968. The "base" model was an instant hit. During this period, Porsche would make continuous improvements and tweaks to the body, to its short wheelbase (SWB) chassis, and to its 2.0 liter flat six engine. Model year 1968 would be the last for the early 911, a transition that would begin with the introduction of the higher output 911S in 1967, followed by the 911L and a new entry level 911T in 1968, and finally, the 911E in 1969. The base 911 was available as both a Coupe and Targa (starting in '67).
In the case of the 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet that begins with a larger, more potent six-cylinder engine. The Carrera 4S is powered by a 3.8-liter flat six that produces 355 horsepower and 295 lb.-ft. of torque. The roughly ten percent increase in power translates to improved acceleration and higher top track speed. The 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet with the six-speed manual gearbox races from a stop to 60 mph in only 4.7 seconds, topping out at the track at 185 mph. When carrying the optional Tiptronic S transmission, the zero to 60 mph sprint takes a mere 4.5 seconds.
With the 1993 Carrera 2 as the starting point, Porsche had to make at least 50 roadgoing cars in order to qualify this new model for the Carrera ADAC GT Cup, which served as the basis for a motor racing variant to come, the Carrera RSR 3.8. The RSR 3.8 was nothing short of an all-out race car that could be delivered to the track in a ‘just add driver’ form. The Porsche Carrera RSR 3.8 racked up a catalogue of impressive international race results right from the outset, winning overall at the Spa 24 Hours, Suzuka 1000km, and the 24 Hours of Interlagos.
2001 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Race Car (996) (2001 - 2004)
In the 2000 FIA GT Championship, the 996 GT3 R was the dominant racer in the new N-GT class and won every run. In the same year, the factory-supported Phoenix Racing won the 24-hour race at the Nürburgring. In 2001, the modified version, now called the 996 GT3 RS, was used. The vehicle was not only very successful in its class, it also achieved overall victories. Modelled on the 911 GT3 R, the GT3 RS race cars offered a number of technical improvements, which combine to ensure a racing car with optimal competitiveness. 50 racing cars were produced.
The new Porsche 911 GT3 Cup is powered by a 3.8-litre six-cylinder flat engine. It generates 460 hp (338 kW) at 7,500 revs, surpassing the predecessor by 10 hp. A six-speed dog-type gearbox developed by Porsche Motorsport which is operated via shift paddles at the steering wheel for the first time in a Porsche brand trophy race car transmits the power to the rear axle. The single piece race wheels with centre mount were also new.
The 997 Carrera 4 was the all-wheel-drive version of the standard 997 Carrera and it arrived as a 2006 model year car (along with the 4S models). The 997.1 Carrera 4 had a3.6 L Watercooled Flat 6 (M96/05) engine that was good for 321 bhp @ 6800 rpm and 273 ft lbs @ 4250 rpm. It had a sub 5 second 0 - 60 mph hour time and a top speed of 174 mph. The transmission (six-speed manual or five-speed Tiptronic) feeds a forward propshaft that mates to a viscous coupling unit with a front differential.
Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet (993)
2,500 cabriolets were made in the 993 Carrera 4. The 993 Carrera 4, sold between 1995 and 1998, uses the same powerplant as the standard 993 Carrera, but puts power down to all four wheels through a 6-speed manual transmission. A “Carrera 4” badge on the tail, along with silver-painted brake calipers and clear front and side turn signals, help distinguish the all-wheel drive C4 from the C2 sibling.
The seventh generation 911 was revealed 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show as an all-new model. It sports a longer wheel base, seven-speed gearbox and more efficient 3.4-liter flat-6. Major options include a 7-Speed automatic transmission , dynamic engine mounts and a Sport Chrono Package with a dash mounted analog stopwatch. This package also features a Sport Plus button that changes the settings of the chassis, engine and transmission for spirited driving. Launch Control is also new.
2023 Porsche 911 Sport Classic
A total of 1,250 examples of the limited-edition model by Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur. While the original was a Carrera S, this time around, the power and handling come from a much feistier car, the Type 922 Turbo S. Returning is that amazing grey paint, that swooping ducktail spoiler, and the double-bubble roof. All-new is a mildly detuned Turbo S engine producing 543 HP and 442 lb-ft of turbocharged torque, mated to what can only be called a gift from the gods, a 7-speed manual gearbox.
Porsche 911 GT2 Clubsport (993)
The GT2 was the hardcore, race-focused version of the 993 Turbo, using essentially the same 3.6 L twin-turbocharged engine, but slightly modified with increased power output. The car was made to compete in the FIA GT2 racing class. Among this already very exclusive circle of 57 cars there is an even more rare community. 20 of the 57 road-legal cars were produced in a second – and last – badge with upgraded engine power (450 PS) called GT2 “Clubsport” which make them the last Porsche models with air-cooled engines.
The 996 GT3 RS was a sharpened version of the Mk.2 GT3, built for track use and it was the homologation model for the GT3 race-car. It was the forbidden fruit for the U.S. and Canadian customers. It was available in a limited number and it was a true track-oriented vehicle. It was based on the GT3 version, but with fewer comfort features and even stiffer suspension. It was the kind of car which could have been taken from the shop and dive into the first race-track. The GT3 was available in white color only, with red or blue inscriptions on its sides. The adjustable rear wing and the “duck-tail” were mounted in the back, to provide better traction on higher speeds. It was fitted with the same engine as the GT3.
More aggressive looks, significant extra power, and highly desirable options. This is the perfect all-round 911. In manual, there is nothing that feels as complete. Some of the technical ingredients that generate even more driving dynamics and driving fun: 430 hp (316 kW) power, the Sport Chrono package and the PASM active damper system which lowers the car's ride height by ten millimetres. The extra punch of the 430-hp engine pushes the 911 Carrera GTS coupe up to 190 mph in rear-wheel-drive/manual-transmission configuration, 2 mph higher than the 400-hp Carrera S.
Image credit: Tim Scott / Fluid Images
To homologate the 1968 911 for competition purposes, Porsche began with the Spartan 911 T which were a full 54 kg (118 pounds) lighter than their 'S' siblings. Porsche offered clients the opportunity to buy a 911 T outfitted with competition equipment directly from the factory, and the resulting cars have become known as the 911 T/R. They were built in low quantities to a range of specifications depending on their intended competition purposes.
The 2022 Porsche Targa 4 GTS adds more grunt, packs less weight, has sharper handling, and packages it up in the sexiest bodystyle that Porsche sells. The Targa 4 GTS gives us the best of all worlds, providing all-wheel-drive traction, an open-top experience, and a fixed-roof feeling in the same car. Its automatic transmission and adaptive suspension completed the image of a daily-driver sports car. This may be the perfect car.
The Porsche 911 Black Edition was a limited production Carrera built at the end of the 997 generation. Based on the 3.6-litre 997.2 Carrera coupe and Cabriolet, the car was finished in plain black as standard, with Basalt Black Metallic as an option. The words ‘Black Edition’ are printed in black on the stainless steel door sill covers, and there’s a numbered plaque on the glovebox lid. 19-inch Turbo wheels were standard. Porsche built exactly 1,911 Black Editions, of which approximately 25 percent were intended for the U.S. market.
In 1980, a true limited edition model 911SC was produced for the American market. The 'Weissach' edition was a standard SC with special paint. It was built in 1980 to honor the Porsche Motorsport team working in Weissach Germany. 468 units were made and half were painted Metallic Black, the other half in Platinum Metallic. The interiors were wrapped in Doric Grey leather with burgundy piping. Additional body and mechanical specs included whale tail spoiler, Bilstein dampers and Fuchs wheels.
Thought it carries a similar design to the new 911, the Carrera 4 has its own unique features, the most obvious being an AWD system hooked up to its new turbocharged 3.0-liter flat-six engine. The C4 gets a spate of new goodies, including a unique taillight section, and an updated infotainment system that brings the sports car’s connectivity to a whole new level. Inside the new 911 Carrera 4, there are only a few changes, the most important is the new infotainment system. With 370 hp on tap from the direct-injection, twin-turbo flat-six and all-wheel drive putting all those ponies to the ground, the C4 is more than quick enough.
Porsche introduced the turbocharged version of the Type 996 for the 2001 model year (late 2000 in Europe). Like the 996 GT3, the Turbo's engine was derived from the engine used in the 911 GT1. Like its predecessor, the 993 Turbo, it featured twin-turbos but now had a power output of 420 PS (309 kW; 414 hp). As of 2002, the X50 package would increase engine output to 444 hp. The 996 Turbo was available with a 6-speed manual transmission or an automatic (Tiptronic), driving power to all four wheels. This is a great great car.
The 2013 Porsche Carrera 4 featured a 3.4-liter flat-six engine. It was mated as standard to a world's first seven-speed manual transmission. An automatic, PDK (dual-clutch) transmission was offered as an option. The Carrera 4 featured an all-wheel-drive torque distribution in the instrument cluster display. The most distinctive identifying feature of the 911 with all-wheel drive is still the wide rear section: compared to the two-wheel drive 911 Carrera models, the rear wheel housings 22 mm wider, and each of the rear tires is 10 mm wider.
The two 997 Targa 4 cars are both offered in only all-wheel-drive. Available with either a 3.6 litre flat 6 in the Targa 4, or with a more powerful 3.8 litre flat 6 in the Targa 4S, the new car offers almost all the fun of a convertible without sacrificing the dynamic abilities of a hardtop. The Targa 4S gets to 60 mph in 4.7 seconds and tops out at 179 mph thanks to its 3.8 liter flat six pumping out 350 bhp and 295 ft lbs of torque. It has softer spring rates than the coupe, a more generous helping of leather in the cabin, a better tally of standard equipment, more storage space behind the front seats.
During the Geneva Motor Show, a Porsche 911 GT3 R with innovative hybrid drive is making its debut. The innovative hybrid technology featured in the car has been developed especially for racing, standing out significantly in its configuration and components from conventional hybrid systems. In this case, electrical front axle drive with two electric motors developing 60 kW each supplements the 480-bhp four-litre flat-six at the rear of the 911 GT3 R Hybrid. Instead of batteries, an electrical flywheel power generator delivers energy to the electric motors.
The Turbo-look Porsche 964 has always been a very desirable automobile, among them 1,532 Carrera 2 Cabriolets constructed worldwide. Within that group, there were some cars that were even more specialized. The Register says six Turbo-look cabriolets were pulled off the production line in Zuffenhausen and transported to the Porsche Exclusive shop in Weissach. Three of these six powerful and luxuriously equipped drop-tops were equipped with left-hand drive for buyers in Germany (Code C00), and the other three were fitted with right-hand drive
2019 911 speedster
Make no mistake that the Speedster is an absolutely fitting conclusion to the 991-generation. The Porsche 911 Speedster is an ingenious amalgamation of the latest technologies on offer, and the more simple ingredients that have been a principle of driving enjoyment since the invention of automobiles. A 502-horsepower engine, without turbochargers. A modern transmission, with just one clutch. A state-of-the-art suspension and chassis, with an unsullied purity. The list goes on. Perhaps the only drawback is that the Speedster’s rarity and price.
The 991 Carrera S continued the time honored Porsche 911 tradition of growing in physical size and power. Over the years the 911 has continued its evolution from a pure sports car to a luxurious super-car and the 2012 Carrera S Coupe was no exception. The seventh generation 911 launched in 2012 and it sits on a new platform, with a longer wheelbase and shorter overhangs. It also featured new headlights and taillights. Features a 3.8-liter flat-six engine mated as standard to a world's first seven-speed manual transmission.
With all-wheel drive and all the GTS goodies, the Carrera 4 GTS sits in a very practical place in the Porsche 911 lineup. The 4 GTS is a Carrera 4S with all the items Porsche thinks you should have at a price that is less than choosing them yourself. Standard equipment on the GTS that is normally optional on the Carrera S includes the Sport Chrono Package, Sport Exhaust, bi-xenon lights with PDLS (Porsche Dynamic Lighting System) and PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management). Inside, four-way adjustable sport seats are standard.
Porsche developed the S/T, of which 33 were built in 1970 and 1971, taking full advantage of new FIA rules allowing a two-inch wider track. Accordingly, wheel arches were widened to accommodate seven-inch front and nine-inch rear wheels. Weight reduction was even more radical, including thinner-gauge steel for the roof and floorpans. Heating ducts, seat slide supports, the glove-box lid, ashtray, sun visors and rear torsion-bar covers were deleted.
The Porsche 911 Targa 4S Heritage Design Edition showcases what is possible with Porsche's Exclusive Manufaktur program and what to expect from Porsche's Heritage Design Strategy. Inspired by the 356 and previous generations of the 911, Porsche's Heritage Design Strategy is bringing period-correct design cues into the current 992 generation 911. Cherry Metallic is the stunning color. Limited to just 992 units globally.
The Porsche 997 GT3 Cup was a series of race cars created by Porsche to enter the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) Group GT3 racing class. Replacing the 996 GT3 Cup, the 997 Cup's 3.6 litre engine is rated at 294 kW (400 PS; 394 hp) and was mated to a six-speed sequential transmission. In 2009, the GT3 Cup received several 997.2 updates including a new 3.8 litre engine with an output of 331 kW (450 PS; 444 hp).
Engine based on modified 3.6 litre 964 unit. Speedline wheels with big red brake calipers. Lessons learned in the Carrera Cup series proved the reliability of the new 3.6-litre engine. An additional three millimetres on the bore and two millimetres on the stroke, resulted in an increase in capacity of 300 cc. Combined with the turbo optimised cylinders, pistons and crank train, and an increase in the compression ratio from 7.0 to 7.5:1, this helped to boost power to 360 bhp. Torque was increased significantly to 520 Nm at 4200 rpm, up from 450 Nm at 4500 rpm in the earlier car.
Paying homage to the first Porsche model that bore the name Speedster – the 356 Speedster – the production run for the new model is limited to 356 cars. The two-seater is significantly different from the other members of the 911 family. In the best tradition, the 60 millimetre lower, more raked windscreen, the flat contour of the sporty-look manual hood, and the characteristic double-bubble hardcover for the soft top define the striking profile of the new 911 Speedster. This makes the body of this rear-wheel drive with its 44 millimetre wider rear stand out even more.
The return of the Touring badge, now on the Type 992. In a way, the car may seem sparingly equipped, and apart from the paint color, the wheels, and if you want a 7-speed manual or 8-speed PDK, it is. But it’s what it’s equipped with that makes the Porsche drivers smile. The purist-focused Carrera T is perfectly specced for fun, with its sweet rear-wheel drive, no rear seats, and a manual gearbox for just $118,050.
Just 50 ‘C16’ cars were manufactured for the UK-market, initially equipped with an uprated engine of 330bhp (from 300) mated to a 4-speed transmission. However, at the end of 1988, the uprated 5-Speed G50 gearbox was introduced, dramatically easing the peaks in power delivery by reducing the effects of ‘turbo-lag’. The factory SE also benefited from a dual-exit exhaust system, limited-slip differential, heated front seats and a sunroof.
The 911 Carrera Cabriolet is a true Porsche, from top to bottom. Like the rest of the range, the base Cabriolet got a mild refresh in terms of design that made it more modern and a little more crisp. The engine was upgraded, now with direct direction. The direct-injection 3.6-liter engine also got new air filters, a more free-flowing exhaust system, and reduced engine friction, making it more powerful than before. It has peak power of 339 bhp @ 6500 rpm and torque of 287 ft lbs @ 4400 rpm. The Carrera equipped with PDK covers 0-60 mph in 4.5 seconds and runs to a top speed of 179 mph.
Porsche offered the 991 Turbo S from the start of the production of the 991 Turbo. The unique features of the Turbo S were the GT3 mirrors, slightly different front spoiler grilles and interior features. As before, the Turbo S was a heavily equipped version of the Turbo. The powerkit added 29 KW of power and the following equipment came as standard: PDCC hydraulic rollbar system, Sport Chrono (Launch control and 0.15 bar overboost functions), dynamic engine mounts, PCCB Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes, central lock wheels, full LED dynamic headlights, 18-way Sport Plus seats with memory.
To celebrate 60 years of Porsche Club of America, PCNA (Porsche Cars North America) ordered 60 units of 911 Carrera GTS Coupés in Club Blue from Porsche Exclusive. All 60 cars were equipped with SportDesign aerokit (including ducktail). These Club cars were not numbered because it wasn't a special series by Porsche AG, but a series of similarly equipped cars ordered by PCNA. The cars got a few unique touches by Porsche Exclusive, like the special "Club Blau" paint, the "Club Coupe" stickers on the doors, the door entry guards with ''GTS Club Coupe" lettering and number "60" embossed on the armrest cover.
This is the open-top model for those who don’t want the full convertible experience – and it’s only available in the wide-hipped four-wheel drive bodyshell. The new Targa is a striking design, echoing the 1965 original with its fixed rollover bar. The Targa 4S, gets you the more powerful 3.8 engine from the Carrera S. It mixes regular Carrera 4S go with a sense of style and everyday usability (those occasional rear seats, the real possibility of 30mpg in everyday driving). Great car.
The 2009 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet shares the same internal 997 model designation as its Coupe siblings. It also shares the same essential all-wheel-drive architecture, interior appointments, suspensions and drivetrains. It is an open-top sports cars that deliver the same exhilarating acceleration and dynamic response as the coupes, regardless of weather or road conditions. The Carrera 4 Cabriolet boast a unique body over their all-wheel-drive powertrains with a wide-body design.
Introduced in 1989 (the year of the 911’s 25th anniversary), the 964 Carrera 4 was a significant new model for the company, but the 4-wheel drive system was deemed unsuitable for the company’s racing series. Manufactured alongside the Carrera 4 at the same time was the more traditional rear-wheel drive Carrera 2, but this model’s launch was only planned for a year later, in the hope that it would not detract from potential sales of the Carrera 4. The 1990 season was the first season that saw the 911-based model become the pillar on which the Porsche Carrera Cup series has been established.
The 2014 Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet is a great companion to its coupe sibling. The Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet delivers the same blend of dynamism, performance and efficiency offered by the Coupe. The turbocharged 3.8-litre six-cylinder engine delivers 520 bhp and it helps drivers accelerate from zero to 60 mph in just 3.1 seconds (there goes your hair style). Compared to the 997.2 Turbo Cabriolet the new Turbo Cab delivers 30 bhp more power and are 0.2 seconds faster in terms of their standard acceleration. It is also up to 15% more efficient and more luxurious and comfortable to boot.
For the 997.2 generation, power from the 3.6-liter Carrera engine was increased to 345 hp while the Carrera S saw 385 horsepower from its 3.8-liter flat-six. Power was sent to the rear wheels via a standard manual box but for the first time, the 997.2 saw the introduction of the dual-clutch PDK as an option. The chassis remains largely unchanged, with slightly modified springs and dampers. The sports suspension is replaced with a variable, electronically controlled sports suspension based on the active PASM suspension. The sweet spot in the used car market at the moment.
Porsche 911 Targa 4 GTS (991.2)
The 911 Targa 4 GTS isn't the fastest or best performing 911. It is heavier, softer and not as fast as every other GTS model. But we still love it. The Targa 4 GTS has amazing performance coupled with the sexiest body in the business. In GTS trim the Targa body looks even better. This is the car you get when you can only choose one 911 and you need it for fun weekends, daily driving and taking the wife out to a fancy restaurant. With 450 hp and 405 lb-ft from 2150 to 5000 rpm, it also has more than enough street performance than you could ever need. Buy one.