Join The World's Fastest Growing Porsche Community >>
2023 Porsche 911 Sport Classic
A total of 1,250 examples of the limited-edition model by Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur. While the original was a Carrera S, this time around, the power and handling come from a much feistier car, the Type 922 Turbo S. Returning is that amazing grey paint, that swooping ducktail spoiler, and the double-bubble roof. All-new is a mildly detuned Turbo S engine producing 543 HP and 442 lb-ft of turbocharged torque, mated to what can only be called a gift from the gods, a 7-speed manual gearbox. Read More
In 1972 Porsche Design was founded. The celebratory car is a 911 Targa 4 GTS, painted and finished to commemorate the Chronograph 1, which Porsche says was the first all-black watch. Gloss black paint is highlighted by a Satin Platinum finish on the targa bar and wheels. Inside, the Edition 50 Years Porsche Design—as English majors, you have no idea how painful it is for us to type that—gets black-and-gray checkered upholstery, a slate-gray steering wheel, and plenty of limited-edition badging, including F.A. Porsche's signature embossed into the center armrest. The powertrain is standard for the Targa 4 GTS. Read More
Also produced for the 1976 "model year", for the U.S. market, was the 912E, a 4-cylinder version of the 911 like the 912 that had last been produced in 1969. It used the I-series chassis and the 2.0 Volkswagen engine from the Porsche 914. In all, 2092 units were produced. In 1976, the Porsche 924 took this car's place for the 1977 "model year" and beyond. The power was supplied by a 4-cylinder high-performance fuel injection motor also used in the Volkswagen 411. Read More
Porsche made its first and most significant changes to the 930 for 1978 model year, enlarging the engine bore by 2 mm (0.08 in) to a total displacement of 3,299 cc (3.3 L; 201.3 cu in) and adding an air-to-air intercooler. The suspension benefitted from new anti-roll bars, firmer shocks and larger diameter rear torsion bars. While the increase in displacement increased power output and torque, it also increased the weight of the vehicle, which contributed to a substantial change in the handling and character of the car compared to the Earlier 3.0-Litre Models. Read More
The 911 Turbo was put into production in 1975. While the original purpose of the 911 Turbo was to gain homologation for the 1976 racing season, it quickly became popular among car enthusiasts. Ernst Fuhrmann adapted the turbo-technology originally developed for the 917/30 CAN-AM car and applied it to the 3.0 litre flat-six used in the Carrera RS 3.0, thus creating what Porsche internally dubbed as the 930. Total power output from the engine was 260 bhp and 254 ft lbs of torque. Read More
The replacement for the SC series came in 1984 as the 911 3.2 Carrera, reviving the Carrera name for the first time since 1977. This was the last iteration in the original 911 series, with all subsequent models featuring new body styling and new brake, electronic, and suspension technologies. Almost the same galvanised body as the SC. Engine was claimed to be 80 per cent new, and the first production 911 to feature an ECU to control the ignition and fuel systems. Read More
The 911 SC effectively replaced the 911 S and was one of Porsche's first models that was meant for the international market. It was sold as a cheaper alternative to the 911 Turbo. The SC used an unblown version the 930 Turbo unit that offered 180 to 200 bhp depending on model year. Options included the rear whale tail, front chin spoiler, Bilstein dampers, 16 inch wheels with Pirelli P7 tires and sports seats. Sometimes dealers lumped these options together to create their own sport package. It was available as a Coupe and Targa from 1978 - 1983, while the Cabriolet version was only available in 1983. Read More
As a successor to the Carrera 2.7 MFI, the Carrera 3.0 was fitted with a variation of the 930's engine without a Turbo. During its production period only 3,687 cars were made. The Carrera 3.0 was replaced by the Porsche 911 SC for model year 1978. Between 1976 and 1977, Porsche introduced the Carrera 3.0 with wide rear flares, optional whale-tail, and other luxury options. Built before the ‘911 SC’ it has everything the SC has, and more. It’s a different drive with more power @200bhp; more torque @188 ft/lb @4200rpm and it was 10% lighter too. Read More
For 1989, Porsche produced the 25th Anniversary Special Edition model to mark the 25th year of 911 production. The 1989 Porsche brochure lists production of 500 U.S. market cars, of which 300 were coupés (240 in silver metallic paint and 60 in satin black metallic), and 200 cabriolet models (160 in silver and 40 in black). All had "silk grey" leather with black accent piping and silk grey velour carpeting. Includes small bronze "25th Anniversary Special Edition" badges. Read More
The Porsche Mobil 1 Supercup features the Porsche 911 GT3 Cup, the world’s best-selling race car. For this season, it’s the new generation. 510 hp, optimised intake manifold, electronic gearshift and power steering, fully digital cockpit, larger rear wing, and a double-wishbone front axle. This is a meaningfully upgraded race car. The new 911 GT3 Cup is taking on a great legacy. And it has already proven itself! Read More
Porsche will only build 30 examples of the Clubsport 25. Mechanically, it's similar to the regular GT2 RS Clubsport. It makes the 691 horsepower from a twin-turbocharged 3.8-liter flat-six. But it gets many, many changes to the exterior and even the cooling system. As you can clearly see, the body has been lengthened, and it has also been widened. The latter is necessary to house the wide, low-offset 18-inch wheels taken from the Porsche 935, though without the aerodynamic covers. Read More
The Porsche 911 Black Edition was a limited production Carrera built at the end of the 997 generation. Based on the 3.6-litre 997.2 Carrera coupe and Cabriolet, the car was finished in plain black as standard, with Basalt Black Metallic as an option. The words ‘Black Edition’ are printed in black on the stainless steel door sill covers, and there’s a numbered plaque on the glovebox lid. 19-inch Turbo wheels were standard. Porsche built exactly 1,911 Black Editions, of which approximately 25 percent were intended for the U.S. market. Read More
The Cabriolet version of the new Porsche 911 Carrera 4 GTS is just as potent as its coupe sibling. It combines a 408 hp 3.8-litre flat six engine with intelligent all-wheel drive that delivers a further exhilarating dimension to the dynamics of the iconic rear-engined sports car. The 911 was first offered with four-wheel drive in 1989 and the drivetrain has been a popular option ever since. Now, the 911 Carrera 4 GTS broadens customer choice in 2011, building on the success of the two-wheel drive Carrera GTS that went on sale in December last year. Carrera 4 GTS power unit is the 3.8-litre flat six with power kit. Read More
The new Porsche 911 Carrera 4 GTS combines a 408 hp 3.8-litre flat six engine with intelligent all-wheel drive that delivers a further exhilarating dimension to the dynamics of the iconic rear-engined sports car. The 911 was first offered with four-wheel drive in 1989 and the drivetrain has been a popular option ever since. Now, the 911 Carrera 4 GTS broadens customer choice in 2011, building on the success of the two-wheel drive Carrera GTS that went on sale in December last year. The 911 Carrera 4 GTS power unit has its origins in the 3.8-litre, six-cylinder from the Carrera S, with the power kit added. Read More
To commemorate the 40th year of 911 production, Porsche built 1963 of the 40th Anniversary Porsche 911 Carrera for model year 2004. Painted only in a GT Silver Metallic finish, with a dark gray leather interior, the 40th Anniversary (or 40 Jahre in German) took the Base Model 996 Carrera and added the front fascia of the 996 Turbo, side skirts and luxury features for the cabin – including a luggage set that matched the special grey leather interior. Mechanically, the X51 Powerkit increases power to 341hp, combined with rear wheels power wheels, a standard 6-speed manual and sport suspension and limited-slip differential included. Read More
The second generation GT3 takes all that was good about it's predecessor and then improves it! Power from the GT1 derived flat-6 is up by 21 bhp to 381 bhp (with an 8200 rpm redline), ride height is lowered for increased stability and also has an upgraded braking setup, as it features a 6-piston calipers on the front. Two versions are offered, the more extreme 'Clubsport' showing it's track day colors with a full roll cage, racing seat and a 6-point harness. The 996.2 GT3 was the first GT3 marketed in the North America. The new Porsche 911 GT3 comes with all the features of half a century Porsche motorsport. It is a sports car for the purist through and through. Read More
The 996 Carrera 4S Cabriolet is the convertible version of the slightly-uprated 996 Carrera 4. Introduced a year after the 996 C4S Coupe. The Carrera 4S Cabriolet was introduced in the lineup with the new engine and the Turbo bodywork. The cabriolet version of the Carrera 4S paired the aggressive bodywork and suspension of the Turbo with the base Carrera 4 drivetrain, though it didn't get the Turbo's huge rear wing. The three-layer canvas-top was powered and it needed 20 seconds to completely retract or cover the car, at speeds up to 50 kph (31 mph). For winter, the car featured an aluminum hard-top. Read More
Introducing this new top-of-the-range model, Porsche is once again placing a 911 Turbo Cabriolet right at the top of the family after a break of 14 years: From 1987 - 1989 the Porsche 930, as the first Turbo was code-named within the Company, set the first milestone in the history of these outstanding open-air sports cars. With cylinders still featuring two valves each at the time, the 3.3-litre power unit driving the first Turbo Cabriolet offered maximum output quite unique at the time of 300 bhp or 221 kW. Acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h was in 5.2 seconds and the car had a top speed of 260 km/h or 161 mph. Read More
In 2002, the standard Carrera models underwent a facelift. In addition, engine capacity was also increased to 3.6-litres across the range, with power up slightly on the naturally aspirated models. 2002 also marked the start of the production of the 996 based Targa model, with a sliding glass "green house" roof system as introduced on its predecessor. It also features a rear glass hatch which gave the driver access to the storage compartment. The 996 Targa is the rarest bodystyle in the series – only 5,152 were produced (all Mk.2 generation) between 2002 and 2005. Read More
Designed as a grand tourer, the Porsche Carrera 4 Cabriolet was the base all-wheel-drive version for the open-top 911 range in 2001. It offered enough comfort to be used as a daily driver, on all weather. The 996 Porsche was facelifted in 2002. Along with the coupe versions, the convertibles were reshaped also. There was not a big difference on the outside. It was the same sports-car and open-top grand tourer. The Carrera 4 Cabriolet, continued on through 2004, receiving the same updates as the Carrera, including the 3.6-liter engine. Read More
The 996 was initially available in a coupé or a cabriolet (Convertible) bodystyle with rear-wheel drive, and later with four-wheel drive, utilising a 3.4 litre flat-6 engine generating a maximum power output of 221 kW (300 PS; 296 hp).[7] The 996 had the same front end as the entry-level Boxster. After requests from the Carrera owners about their premium cars looking like a "lower priced car that looked just like theirs did", Porsche redesigned the headlamps of the Carrera in 2002. With the cabriolet, buyers have a choice between this version and the hotter Carrera 4S cabriolet. Read More
In 2002, all of the standard models received a minor makeover in 2002 which included Turbo-style headlights, a freshly designed front clip and an increase in engine capacity to 3.6L along with a subsequent 20HP boost. The bodies were more rigid which further improved handling and safety and the lower, stiffer X74 suspension became available as a factory modification. From the outside, it was hard to notice the difference between the 1998 version and the facelifted model. The main difference was on the headlights. Including the Mk 1 cars, the 996 Carrera Coupe sold 46,317 units. Read More
In 2002, the entire generation of the 996 was facelifted. The Carrera 4S Cabriolet was introduced in the lineup with the new engine and the Turbo bodywork. Many publications called the Carrera 4S the sweet spot in the 911 lineup when it was introduced, providing more performance than the base car without the exorbitant pricing of a Turbo or GT2. The Carrera 4S paired the aggressive bodywork and suspension of the Turbo with the base Carrera 4 drivetrain, though it didn't get the Turbo's huge rear wing. It’s easily identified by “Carrera 4S” badging and a large reflective strip on the rear end, spanning the gap between the taillights. Read More
Model year 1994. Carrera 4 Wide-Body for the U.S. Technically there is really no difference between the Carrera 4 Wide-Body and his RoW counterpart. At the front there are the for America usual black impact absorbers beside the fog lights, the frontfenders lack the side indicators, the rear bumper is equipped with the center piece with a small plate section and in the back window of a large third brake light is integrated. Significant differences, it is generally provided in the factory standard equipment. Read More
Porsche 911 Speedster (Turbo-Look) (964)
In contrast to the 911 Speedster from the 1989 model year, the 964 Speedster was only offered and produced with the narrow body shape. In December 1991, the first wide bodied prototype based on a 964 Carrera 2 Convertible Turbo-Look was registered at Porsche AG, but it never made it ready for a series production. In response to recurring customer requests for Turbo-Look Speedsters - the optical characteristics of the wide body in combination with the flat windscreen and fiberglass cover had found many fans - Porsche converted the previously individually ordered, narrow Speedster in the exclusive department. Read More
Porsche 911 ’30 Jahre’ Anniversary (964) (1993)
In March 1993, Porsche presented the Porsche 911 anniversary model “30 years 911” at the Geneva Motor Show. Since then, the special model is also called “Jubi” for short. Under the Porsche internal code M096, there is essentially a Carrera 4 with the wide turbo body but without wings. The 964 anniversary edition could be ordered with exclusive interior design and numerous possibilities of customization. According to Porsche, the special model was limited to 911 vehicles and manufactured in the model years 1993 and 1994. Read More
The 964 Carrera RS 3.8 was produced as a base for homologation for the venerable 3.8 RSR. It was unveiled in 1993 and produced in a very small series by Porsche’s Racing Department in Weissach-Flacht, and was an extreme evolution of the 964 Carrera RS that was released two years prior. It featured the wide-body look of the Type 964 Turbo, a massive rear spoiler, and three-piece “Speedline for Porsche” wheels with 235/40 and 285/35 tires, making it distinctively more aggressive in appearance than the fairly restrained styling of the Carrera RS of 1992 and capable of providing significantly more mechanical grip. Read More
The 964 based Speedster was the 1994 Speedster which was based on the 964 Carrera 2 platform. There are far fewer 1994 911 Speedsters in the world than the 1989 model, with production reportedly totaled only around 936 units, less than half as many as the 1989 example. Whereas the 1989 Speedster was primarily an aesthetic package, the 964 version sought a happy medium between the regular Carrera 2 and the hardcore Carrera RS. It had the same engine as the base Carrera and didn’t have the same suspension bits as the RS. Read More
The original 1973 Carrera RS was available in Europe but not in the USA. Porsche decided to build the 1993 Carrera RS both to European spec and a limited number in compliance with US regulations. These US spec cars were assigned the name “RS America”. The intent was to create a basic lightweight, no frills 911 with minimal luxury options. The standard US Carrera 2 brakes, engine and gearbox were used. The RS weighed 2,945 pounds so it was almost 80 pounds lighter than a standard Carrera 2.  Read More
The Turbo-look Porsche 964 has always been a very desirable automobile, among them 1,532 Carrera 2 Cabriolets constructed worldwide. Within that group, there were some cars that were even more specialized. The Register says six Turbo-look cabriolets were pulled off the production line in Zuffenhausen and transported to the Porsche Exclusive shop in Weissach. Three of these six powerful and luxuriously equipped drop-tops were equipped with left-hand drive for buyers in Germany (Code C00), and the other three were fitted with right-hand drive Read More
Porsche 911 Turbo S2 (964) (1992)
A forgotten part of the 964s history is the Turbo S2. It was built to adhere to homologation rules so Porsche could participate in IMSA's sports car racing series. IMSA's homologation rules meant that Porsche had to build at least 200 road-going versions of the participating car, 20 of which needed to share most of the primary components of the race car. The 911 Turbo S2 was built specifically for this purpose and exclusively for the United States and Canada. The 20 homologation specials left the factory as stock 964 Turbos, heading immediately to California-based tuner for "S2" engine upgrades. Read More
Porsche 911 America Roadster (964) (1992 - 1993)
The American Roadster is essentially a turbo-bodied Carrera Cabriolet with Turbo suspension and brakes. Like the 356 America Roadster it was named after, the Type 964 America Roadster was a limited-edition, driver-focused convertible destined for the American market. Production for the America Roadster was limited at only 250 examples, and the model was only produced in 1992 and 1993. Its engine was a standard unit making 250 horsepower, but the special edition had the wide fender flares, suspension, brakes, and 17-inch Porsche Cup wheels of the 911 Turbo. Read More
The 2022 Porsche Targa 4 GTS adds more grunt, packs less weight, has sharper handling, and packages it up in the sexiest bodystyle that Porsche sells. The Targa 4 GTS gives us the best of all worlds, providing all-wheel-drive traction, an open-top experience, and a fixed-roof feeling in the same car. Its automatic transmission and adaptive suspension completed the image of a daily-driver sports car. This may be the perfect car. Read More
Porsche has also decided to gift the GTS a more distinct and dynamic personality that can’t be duplicated via the Carrera S’s options list (even if you could get the engine, which you cannot). The downside is that the price has gone up too and ticking a few more options boxes can get the Carrera 4 GTS Cabriolet into 911 Turbo territory price-wise. In the engine department, the 3-litre twin turbo flat six develop 473 bhp and 420 ft lbs. Read More
The engine is the same 3.0-litre, twin-turbocharged flat-six petrol engine as in the 911 Carrera S, but it has been fettled to produce 473 bhp. The GTS also has a bespoke suspension set-up that sits 10mm lower than the standard 911, and that's true no matter whether you choose two- or four-wheel drive. Most of the time, there's absolutely no difference between the standard GTS and the all-wheel-drive version. But when you need it, the AWD Carrera 4 GTS will save you. Read More
The 2022 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS Cabriolet arrives with 473 horsepower and 420 ft lbs of torque. Porsche's ultimate Carrera cabriolet model is brilliant, and flexible. Sure, you can go faster in a 992 911 Turbo, but we guarantee it won't be as much fun or as engaging as the GTS Cabriolet. This is just a great car, an all-round sports car that combines effortless performance with open top fun. It gets a 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged flat-six engine producing 473 horsepower. Read More
The reality was that in the past you could basically build your own GTS. In the past, Porsche offered an optional factory "power kit" for 911 Carreras, but things are different now. That isn't an option for the 992. The 992 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS is therefore your only pass for accessing a version of the 3.0-liter twin-turbo flat-six tuned up to 473 hp and 420 ft lbs of torque. Those figures are achieved via an approximately 14.5 percent increase in turbo boost pressure. Read More
Essentially a Carrera 3.2 with a chopped, more steeply raked windscreen and hood, plus a stripped-out interior. Most had wide Turbo bodies. Porsche insisted that the simple hood was not designed to be 100 per cent watertight. The first Porsche 911 Speedster was built in 1989 and it was the last vehicle with the old 911 body. Three decades passed before the Speedster made a comeback. Had a 3.2 L Aircooled Flat 6 and 2274 were produced for the 1989 model year. Read More
The Touring makes sense for those who envision their GT3 more as a daily mode of transportation than a track specialist (it can do both well). GT performance is good enough for any paved road but the Touring was created for a certain type of personality. There is no other car that can invoke a sense of connection and purpose like a GT3 Touring (with a 6-speed manual transmission) can. This is the car to buy and own forever. Read More
The 992-era 911 GT3 confirms that Porsche is prepared to go to astonishing lengths to keep the hardcore faithful happy. The engine is a naturally aspirated 4.0-litre that revs to 9,000 rm and has little in common with the unit found elsewhere in the 992 range and a lot to do with the one in the GT3 Cup car. Power is up a modest 10bhp to 503 bhp, torque to 347 ft lbs. That’s more than enough. It’ll accelerate to 62mph in 3.4 seconds. It is the best sports car on the planet. Read More
The Porsche 911 Targa 4S Heritage Design Edition showcases what is possible with Porsche's Exclusive Manufaktur program and what to expect from Porsche's Heritage Design Strategy. Inspired by the 356 and previous generations of the 911, Porsche's Heritage Design Strategy is bringing period-correct design cues into the current 992 generation 911. Cherry Metallic is the stunning color. Limited to just 992 units globally. Read More
The GT3 R has always been placed between the GT3 Cup and the very expensive RSR. All the 991.2 racing cars have normally aspirated 4-litre engines. Compared to the 991.1 GT3 R, the 991.2 GT3 R engine offers a broader usable rev range and the engine response is more precise due to 6 throttle butterflies. The roof, front hood and fairing, wheel arches, doors, side and tail sections, rear lid and interior trim are made of carbon-fibre reinforced plastic. Gets new double wishbone suspension. Read More
This was the fourth version of the 991 RSR - the first two came with the rear engine, then the first mid-engine version was launched (all 4.0-litre) and finally the mid-engined RSR 4.2 with the largest 911 engine ever made. The increase in the engine capacity is a question mark as on production models the capacities are decreased and turbochargers are used. The 991 RSR 4.2 didn't have anything in common with the production cars anymore. No change in terms of power-to-weight ratio. Read More
Based on the 530-bhp 911 Turbo S, the special-edition Porsche has carbon-fiber trim inside and out, plus upgraded leather, badging and the exterior colors of the 918, including the use of Acid Green on the brake calipers, illuminated sill plates, interior stitching and instrument cluster needles. Also limited to 918 units, the 911 Turbo S Edition 918 Spyder will be available in Coupe ($160,700) and Cabriolet ($172,100) forms, making this one very expensive dealer option. Read More
In 2011, Porsche China released a special limited edition model to celebrate an active decade in the Chinese market. The Porsche 10 Year Anniversary Edition is yet another 911 of only ten copies, each with a stylish plaque with the chassis number. The Porsche has a Gold Bronze Metallic paint, combined with matte black carbon components such as the hood, rear wing, tailgate and side mirrors. Underneath, you will spot a 911 Turbo S. The interior is a combination of black with gold stitching leather, alcantara and carbon. Read More
Like the standard 4S, the Targa 4S produces 443 bhp @ 6500 rpm from a six-cylinder, 3.0-litre boxer engine with twin turbochargers, and puts it to the road via an eight-speed PDK and Stuttgart's refined all-wheel-drive system. 390 ft lbs from as low as 2300 rpm also means you have tons of mid-range power on tap for any situation. Compared to the previous generation Targa 4S, the new model is up 23 hp and 22 ft lbs of torque.  Read More
While the base Targa isn't the most dynamic 911, it will suit a certain buyer well. If you want the sexiest looking 911 that is a great all-rounder and you don't plan on spanking it all the time, then this is a great 911 to buy. Even in lower-powered form, the 3.0-liter is a peach of an engine. Torquey across its rev range, it responds quickly to prods of the throttle. The real problem with the Targa is the added weight and the structure, which hurts it dynamically. Read More
Engine based on modified 3.6 litre 964 unit. Speedline wheels with big red brake calipers. Lessons learned in the Carrera Cup series proved the reliability of the new 3.6-litre engine. An additional three millimetres on the bore and two millimetres on the stroke, resulted in an increase in capacity of 300 cc. Combined with the turbo optimised cylinders, pistons and crank train, and an increase in the compression ratio from 7.0 to 7.5:1, this helped to boost power to 360 bhp. Torque was increased significantly to 520 Nm at 4200 rpm, up from 450 Nm at 4500 rpm in the earlier car. Read More
All Porsche 911s are turbocharged these days but the Turbo model is something special. It gets the twin-turbo 3.7-liter flat six with tons of power and a huge $33,000 savings over the Turbo S. Thanks to an output of 573 hp, marking an increase of 32 hp over the predecessor, the new 911 Turbo Cabriolet accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 2.8 seconds (0.2 seconds faster than before). The Turbo Cabriolet basically handles like a coupe. Read More
It would be a disservice to call this new Turbo a "lesser" car than the Turbo S, but it does have less in most departments. Less power at 573 HP. Less features compared to the jam-packed Turbo S. Most importantly, less money required to put one in your garage. This also is not to say that the new Turbo isn't anything short of a monster. It will still go 0 to 60 in 2.8 seconds, will corner like it was on rails with Porsche Torque Management (PTM) all-wheel-drive. Read More
The 2022 Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet is a formidable beast. The new Turbo S comes with an all-new, 3.8 liter boxer six with two variable turbine geometry (VTG) turbochargers. The power output is a staggering 640 hp and 590 lbs-ft of torque. In keeping with previous Turbo models, the engine powers all four wheels. A new 8 speed automatic transmission with a manual mode manages the power, and can power the car to 60 mph in a hair under a claimed 2.7 seconds. Read More
The current Turbo S comes with an all-new, 3.8 liter boxer six with two variable turbine geometry (VTG) turbochargers. The power output is a staggering 640 HP and 590 lbs-ft of torque. In keeping with previous Turbo models, the engine powers all four wheels. A new 8 speed automatic transmission with a manual mode manages the power, and can power the car to 60 MPH in a hair under a claimed 2.6 seconds. This is a staggeringly quick and capable car. Read More
Features like Porsche’s active suspension and the new-for-992 “wet mode” are standard on the Carrera 4 variants, but the electronically controlled limited slip rear differential (standard on the 4S), as well as ceramic composite brakes (cast iron rotors are standard). The current 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet is equipped with PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management). The twin-turbo flat-six has 379 hp and 331 ft lbs of torque. Read More
The Carrera 4 is the base model 911, equipped with all-wheel drive. It starts at $109,850 for 2022, which is about $7,000 more than the standard rear-drive Carrera. Other than the additional all-wheel-drive system and the 150 odd pound increase in curb weight, the Carrera 4 is identical to its rear-drive sibling. It gets the same 379-hp, twin-turbo 3.0-liter flat-six engine. The twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter flat-six has 379 hp. Read More
2019 911 speedster
Make no mistake that the Speedster is an absolutely fitting conclusion to the 991-generation. The Porsche 911 Speedster is an ingenious amalgamation of the latest technologies on offer, and the more simple ingredients that have been a principle of driving enjoyment since the invention of automobiles. A 502-horsepower engine, without turbochargers. A modern transmission, with just one clutch. A state-of-the-art suspension and chassis, with an unsullied purity. The list goes on. Perhaps the only drawback is that the Speedster’s rarity and price. Read More
Top down summertime driving in the current 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet is about as good as it gets. It checks all of the right boxes, as while it has matured into almost a GT-type car; it still boasts more performance than ever. Like the rest of Carrera S models, the Carrera 4S Cabriolet is powered by the same 3.0-liter twin-turbo flat-six that makes 443 horsepower and 390 ft lbs of torque. It comes standard with the same eight-speed twin-clutch automatic transmission. Read More
The perfect daily driving sports car with an all-weather, remarkably high-performance envelope. Like the rest of Carrera S models, the Carrera 4S is powered by the same 3.0-liter twin-turbo flat-six that makes 443 horsepower and 390 lb-ft of torque. It also comes standard with the same eight-speed twin-clutch automatic transmission with the same gear ratios, except the 4S with an added clutch and differential up front. Read More
The Porsche 911 Carrera S Cabriolet also features a heated glass rear window and integrated magnesium support elements. The automatic fabric top opens and closes at speeds of up to 31 miles per hour in just 12 seconds – one second quicker than before. The 992 Carrera S Cabriolet gets a twin-turbo 3.0-liter flat-six with 443 bhp and 390 ft lbs of torque. That is 29 more horsepower and 22 more ft lbs of torque than the outgoing model. Read More
If the base 911 coupe doesn't do it for you, maybe the Carrera S coupe gets you over the line. For about $20k more, you get more horsepower, torque vectoring and bigger wheels. The Carrera S uses a version of the 3.0L twin-turbo flat-6 that generates 443 hp and 390 lb-ft of torque. Torque vectoring allows different amounts of torque to be distributed between drive wheels on the same axle. This means the inside wheel can turn slower than the outside wheel for improved cornering. Read More
Removing the roof the car is supposed to have little impact on its chassis stiffness and curvy road prowess, but Porsche tells us that the current generation 911 Cabriolet drives just as well as the coupe. Powering the base Cabriolet is the same impressive turbocharged flat-six engine that makes 379 bhp @ 6500 rpm and 331 ft lbs of torque. The base cabriolet can do the 0 to 60 mph run in 4.2 seconds flat. With the optional Sport Chrono Package that drops to 4.0 seconds. Read More
The most basic version of the Porsche 911 Carrera has now been unveiled. Porsche chose to detune the twin-turbocharged flat-six engine and downgrade some of the chassis components. These cars offer very good performance and driving dynamics for a slightly lower price. While marginally larger and heavier than the 991-generation model it replaced, the 992 is also more advanced. Power climbs by 15 bhp from the 991 Carrera, to 379 bhp @ 6500 rpm, which is more than enough horsepower for the street. Read More
Matt Prior from Autocar nails the 991.2 GT3 RS: “While I don’t think the 3 communicates any better than a 2, the messages it does transmit are superior: you can feel that it’s lighter, more willing to turn, easier and more satisfying to ease onto the throttle and keep it pinned. It’s why this car is only a few seconds slower than a 2RS around the Nürburgring Nordschleife despite being almost 200bhp down.” He goes on... “And in the form of the GT3 RS it goes into creating - little by little, detail by detail - what might just be the best driver’s car currently on sale.” Read More
The GT2 RS's reputation as the most powerful street-legal car is as monstrous as this comprehensive guide. Suffice to say, this supercar has been built with the best Porsche has to offer. It's not bragging, it's just facts. There is no doubt that the new GT2 RS is the pinnacle of the 911 in terms of performance. It is simply the fastest 911 in history, and that’s a fact. It is the quickest production car to lap the Nürburgring Nordschleife. It is the most powerful 911 ever made. Read More
The 500 hundred numbered 911 Turbo S Exclusive Series cars cross the 600 hp mark with their 446 kW engines. The power increase does not make much difference performance wise, but it is good to know you have more than 600 hp. Similar in acceleration and top speed to the ‘regular’ Turbo S, the car reaches 200 km/h (124 mph) in 9.6 seconds (0.3 seconds faster than the regular Turbo S). The car comes standard with the Turbo Aerokit and roof panel made of carbon-fibre reinforced plastic. Read More
To the untrained eye, the Carrera T may appear to be a bare-bones and sparingly equipped 911 at first glance. The purpose of the T is to create a driver-focused 911, equipped with only the necessities required to appeal to those of a purist’s ilk. The Carrera T employs the same power plant used in the current base Carrera - a twin-turbocharged 3.0L flat-six with 370 horsepower and 331 lb-ft of torque. A 7-speed manual transmission comes standard with the T, along with a shorter final-drive ratio and the limited-slip differential. Porsche Sport Exhaust (PSE) is also standard. PASM sport suspension comes standard in the T, which lowers the chassis by 0.4 inches relative to the base Carrera and allows for two modes of dampening. Read More
Porsche made a lightweight version of the Turbo simply known as the Tuubo S. This used the spartan appointments of the Carrera RS with an upgraded version of the Turbo engine. Some cars received graphics on the side celebrating IMSA Supercar Championship. Similar to the Carrera RS, the Turbo S had no power steering, air conditioning, airbags, central locking, alarm system, rear window wiper, smaller window washer reservoir, smaller horn, and had thin-gauge glass. The engine used a second oil cooler and slightly higher boost to improve overall performance. Read More
The 1989/90 change of model year saw the launch of the Porsche 911, 964 series onto the market. This 911 model was initially available as a Coupe, Targa and Convertible. From model year 1991 onwards Porsche also introduced its top-of-the-line model - the Turbo - into this series. In spite of bearing a major similarity in terms of look to the naturally-aspirated model, the extended wings remained. This meant that the new Porsche could retain its turbo look. The 964 Turbo model was the successor to the Porsche 930. The 964 Turbo was the end of an era, the last of the single turbo rear-wheel drive 911 Turbos. Read More
A single car - the 911 GT1-98 Straßenversion - was built in 1998 to homologate the all-new racing version under the new FIA regulations. The engine had to be slightly de-tuned to meet European emissions laws, although its 400 kW (544 PS; 536 hp) at 7,200 rpm and 600 N⋅m (443 lb⋅ft) of torque at 4,250 rpm proved to be more than adequate; the car could accelerate to 100 km/h (62 mph) from a standstill in 3.6 seconds on its way to a top speed of 193 mph. Read More
It's not often Porsche creates an all-new model in their 911 lineup. But the 997 Carrera GTS is just that. It's faster, more powerful and better looking than any other model in the Carrera family. However it's still a little less hardcore than the 911 GT3, and a lot cheaper than the 911 Turbo. The Porsche 911 Carrera GTS features a 3.8 litre flat-six engine which is tuned to develop 408 horsepower, that's 23 hp more than the Carrera S manages. Think of it as the perfectly optioned Carrera S for less money. Read More
Of all the 1580 Carrera RS 2.7s, only 200 were made were ordered with this lightweight ‘Sports’ trim which made the car more responsive and purposeful. In many ways these few cars were the ultimate road-going Porsche of the 1970s. Known as the Sports, Lightweight or even the M471 option code, these cars had improved the power-to-weight ratio. Reports of 75kg were stripped from the standard model by fitting lightweight body panels and lightweight glass. Read More
Revealed at the 1972 Paris Auto Show, the Carrera 2.7 RS was a special model used to homologate the 911 in Group 4 racing. Developed from the 911S, the 2.7 was more potent in almost every area. Compared to the standard Carrera, the 2.7 RS featured a larger engine, wider flares to accommodate the Fuchs alloy wheels, stiffened suspension, larger brakes and a ducktail rear spoiler. The Touring outsold the Lightweight, with a total of 1380 units built (the Lightweight had only 200 units). Read More
The Cabriolet version of the 991.2 Turbo got the same updates as its coupe sibling. The engine in the 991.2 911 Turbo Cabriolet is a twin-turbocharged flat-six with 540 horsepower and 523 pound-feet of torque, up a decent 20 more horses versus the 991.1 Turbo Cab. Improvements that come from increases in boost and fuel-injection pressures. Rounding the skidpad, the Turbo posts 1.02 g’s relatively easily. The wide P Zeros in back and the standard four-wheel steering conspire to hide the fact that 62 percent of the Turbo’s 3656 pounds sits over the rear wheels. 0 - 60 mph is over in just 3 seconds. Read More
At the heart of the 991.2 911 Turbo is a twin-turbocharged flat-six with 540 horsepower and 523 pound-feet of torque. That’s a meaningful 20 more horses than the 991.1 Turbo. Improvements that come from increases in boost and fuel-injection pressures. Rounding the skidpad, the Turbo posts 1.02 g’s relatively easily. The wide P Zeros in back and the standard four-wheel steering conspire to hide the fact that 62 percent of the Turbo’s 3656 pounds sits over the rear wheels. With sport-plus selected, the 991.2 Turbo hits a 1.0-second run to 30 mph and a 2.6-second zero-to-60 time. Read More
This car was officially called as the 911 GT2 RS Clubsport, but the name is rather misleading. The car was not built for the GT2 racing class which is long extinct and club sport has stood for Porsche club track days while this non-streel-legal car is a real racing car. Finally, the car was based on the 991 GT2 RS, which already had the Clubsport version. So, in order to understand what is what, we call it "991 GT2 RS Clubsport racing version". The 991 GT2 RS engine with 515 kW was powerful enough, so it was not tuned. Read More
Two decades after the different 911 GT1 cars the mid-engined 911 is back! In order to install a proper diffuser under the rear end of the 991, the engine had to make room for it and the engine/transmission unit was rotated 180 degrees. The extended rear diffuser, a top-suspended rear wing and the new side mirrors help to increase downforce with reduced drag. The FIA rules meant no turbo was needed due to power limits, so the normally aspirated 4-litre flat-6 was taken from the 991 GT3 R. Read More
Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Targa (964) (1990 - 1993)
Like the Carrera 4, the Carrera 2 was available as a coupé, Targa or Cabriolet. This was the last generation Targa with traditional removable Targa roof (till 991). It sold ok, with 3,534 units sold over its lifetime. The engine was the 3.6 liter unit which produced 250 horsepower and a maximum speed of 162 mph while the 0 to 60 mph acceleration was made in about 5.6 seconds. Performance was on par with the coupe and it is the looker in the 964 range. Read More
Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Targa (964) (1990 - 1993)
This was the last generation Targa with traditional removable Targa roof (till 991). The Carrera 4 Targa outsold the Carrera 2 Targa by 2x, making the 4 Targa much rarer and more collectible. In all, only 1,329 units were made. Overall, the Carrera 4 packed almost the same technical specifications as the Carrera 2 model. The Targa top was quite a project to take off (compared to the simple and fast cabriolet process) so be prepared to garage it all the time or spend 20 minutes every time you want to enjoy open top fun. Read More
Porsche added the rear wheel drive Carrera 2 variant to the range in 1990. It was developed alongside the 964 Carrera 4, Porsche waited a year to release the Carrera 2 as a 1990 model year car. Like the Carrera 4, the Carrera 2 was available as a coupé, Targa or Cabriolet. Think of the cabriolet as a C2 coupe but with a fabric roof and more fun and you are right on the money. It was popular amongst buyers, particularly in the United States, with a total of 11,013 units sold, making it the third most popular 964 model.  Read More
Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe (964) (1990 - 1994)
Porsche added the rear wheel drive Carrera 2 variant to the range in 1990. It was developed alongside the 964 Carrera 4, Porsche waited a year to release the Carrera 2 as a 1990 model year car. Like the Carrera 4, the Carrera 2 was available as a coupé, Targa or Cabriolet. Overall, the Carrera 2 packed almost the same technical specifications as the Carrera 4 model. The engine was the same 3.6 liter unit which produced 250 horsepower and a maximum speed of 162 mph. Looked like C4 but was 200 lb lighter and more fun to drive. Read More
Porsche is the most successful marque in the 24 Hours of Le Mans and British drivers have played an important role in delivering these historical achievements, and in celebration of this success a special limited edition model – the 911 Carrera 4 GTS British Legends Edition was created. Designed by the drivers who took wins in the 24 Hours of Le Mans for the factory team – Richard Attwood (winner 1970), Derek Bell MBE (winner 1981, 1982, 1986, 1987) and Nick Tandy (winner 2015) – this model was developed by Porsche Cars GB and Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur. Read More
Homologated roadgoing version of the ’97 911 GT1 Evolution racer costing $890,805 upon release. Twin-turbochargers were fitted to the M96/80 engine, which had water-cooled cylinder heads. Apparent from the front and rear lights, the GT1 shares many components with its series production counterparts, but puts them together in a more competitive way. Gone is the rear engine layout which isn't suitable for prototype GT racing, the GT1's turbocharged flat-six engine sits in front of the rear axle and is supported by chassis tubes instead of the typical 911 rear sub frame.  Read More
The new Porsche 911 GT3 carries the same four-litre flat engine from the GT3 RS with its power increased by 25hp for a new total of 500hp. The chassis is also redesigned and now features a rear-axle steering and a lighter construction. The Porsche 911 GT3 type 991.2 comes in at 1,430 kg when its tank is full. Although it is a bit heavier than the previous model, it still manages to reach 0-100km/h in just 3.4 seconds and reach top speeds of 318km/h. What’s more interesting here is that Porsche finally decided to switch back to a 6-speed manual gearbox (7-speed PDK is standard). Read More
With the Turbo S, the PDCC Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control hydraulic roll bars came as standard. The PCCB Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes had been standard on the Turbo S already since the 996 generation. New options included the radar-based lane change assist and a lift system for the front axle (increased ground clearance by 1.6″/40 mm). The PCM now had a multi-touch screen like in the facelifted 991 Carrera. Routes and places could be visualized with 360-degree images and satellite images. Engine gets more horsepower too, now with 572 bhp and 553 ft lbs of torque. Read More
This is the fastest convertible GT you can buy. The Turbo S cab gets 572 bhp (39 hp more than the base turbo cab) and 553 ft lbs (9 ft lbs more than the regular cab) of torque. With the Turbo S, the PDCC Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control hydraulic roll bars came as standard. The PCCB Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes had been standard on the Turbo S already since the 996 generation. New options included the radar-based lane change assist and a lift system for the front axle (increased ground clearance by 1.6″/40 mm). The PCM now had a multi-touch screen like in the facelifted 991 Carrera. Read More
Porsche 911 Targa 4 GTS (991.2)
The 911 Targa 4 GTS isn't the fastest or best performing 911. It is heavier, softer and not as fast as every other GTS model. But we still love it. The Targa 4 GTS has amazing performance coupled with the sexiest body in the business. In GTS trim the Targa body looks even better. This is the car you get when you can only choose one 911 and you need it for fun weekends, daily driving and taking the wife out to a fancy restaurant. With 450 hp and 405 lb-ft from 2150 to 5000 rpm, it also has more than enough street performance than you could ever need. Buy one. Read More
Porsche 911 Carrera 4 GTS Cabriolet (991.2)
The GTS 4 Cabriolet reminds us how awesome Porsche cars are. This is a 911 that can be used as a regular car, an all weather convertible 911 that does everything really well. And when you want to push hard, the car transforms into a true sports car, a car that no enthusiast will ever complain about. Drop-top 911s have always played a supporting role to the fixed roof versions, but in GTS specification the Cabriolet is now better than ever. Read More
911 Carrera 4 GTS
Ultimately, the Carrera 4 GTS is the ideal all-round 911. Its bag of tricks gives you accessible, astonishing performance on the right road – but its price tag and comfort levels make it a little more acceptable for everyday use than a GT2, GT3 or Turbo. The GTS scores particularly well on the practicality to performance ratio. Its rear seats can accommodate people and its all-wheel drive system means you can really use this car all-year round. The GTS-spec 3.0-litre flat-six develops 30bhp more than a Carrera S (at 444bhp) and 37lb ft more torque (at 406lb ft). Read More
Porsche 911 Carrera GTS Cabriolet (991.2)
Porsche really has hit its brief with the turbocharged Carrera GTS Cabriolet. It is hugely capable on the road, easy to live with on a daily basis, and come the weekend, it’s massively fast on track. For the money, and for drivers who really want just a little more 911, but without the mind-bending speed of a Turbo or uncompromising nature of a GT3, then this is the car for you. It also looks unique and has enough of its own style that it it feels special both on the outside and inside. Read More
The GTS coupe starts with the wider Carrera 4 body, with the rear fenders pushed out 1.7 inches, and the rear track widened 1.6in. Up front is the new SportDesign front fascia with its lower front spoiler and larger cooling air intakes. Standard wheels are 20-inch center lock items and 0.5 inch wider than standard Carrera S rims, finished in satin black. There are splashes of black elsewhere, too. The changes run more than skin deep. Bigger turbos pump up to 18psi of boost pressure which helps deliver not only 30 extra horses at 6,500 rpm, but 405 lb-ft of torque between 2,150 rpm and 5,000 rpm, up from 368 lb-ft. This is the sweet spot. Read More
The rear of the world’s most-produced GT racing car now houses a 4-litre, six-cylinder flat engine for even more drive. Thanks to thoroughbred motorsport technology, the compact engine with direct fuel injection delivers peak performance of 357 kW (485 hp). A range of innovative details also improve efficiency in addition to engine performance, ensuring even better durability of the naturally aspirated engine in racing mode and reduced maintenance costs. Read More
The 996 GT3 RS was a sharpened version of the Mk.2 GT3, built for track use and it was the homologation model for the GT3 race-car. It was the forbidden fruit for the U.S. and Canadian customers. It was available in a limited number and it was a true track-oriented vehicle. It was based on the GT3 version, but with fewer comfort features and even stiffer suspension. It was the kind of car which could have been taken from the shop and dive into the first race-track. The GT3 was available in white color only, with red or blue inscriptions on its sides. The adjustable rear wing and the “duck-tail” were mounted in the back, to provide better traction on higher speeds. It was fitted with the same engine as the GT3. Read More
The 2005 Porsche 996 Turbo S was available as both a coupe and cabriolet – it was basically a standard Turbo model with the X50 Powerkit and carbon-ceramic brakes fitted, alongside a few luxury features for the interior. Approximately 1558 Turbo S models (split between coupe and cabrio) were sold in 2005. Also included are small aluminum appointments to the interior and Turbo S badging. A great all-rounder with the extra power to surprise most. The Turbo S with manual transmission (coupé) sprints from zero to 200 km/h in 13.6 seconds. This is another 0.8 seconds faster than the 911 Turbo. Quite rare, with only a total of 600 units made. Read More
Porsche 911 Turbo X50 (996)
The optional X50 Performance Package gave the base Turbo larger K24 turbochargers and intercoolers, a revised ECU and a quad-pipe exhaust, raising the engine’s output from 415 to 450 bhp and maximum torque from 415 to 457 ft lbs. With power at 450 bhp @ 6000 rpm and torque of 457 ft lbs @ 4400 rpm, the X50 option is a monsters. Porsche engineers achieved the increase in power and performance through modifications to the Turbo charger, the change air cooler, the control units and exhaust system in particular. The base constructions of the manual and automatic transmissions were also improved. Read More
The heart of this most exclusive high-performance athlete is of course a six-cylinder boxer boosted by two exhaust gas turbochargers with variable turbine geometry, with an increase in power over the 911 Turbo by 30 to 530 bhp (390 kW). Maximum torque is a most impressive 700 Newton-metres (516 lb-ft). At the same time this new top model comes as standard with all high-tech components available only as options on the “regular” 911 Turbo. The 911 Turbo S comes exclusively with seven-speed Porsche-Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK) conveying drive power to PTM all-wheel drive. Read More
Become A Full Fledged Member
No Pesky Ads. Full Access to Featured Content. Awesome Discounts on Products