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In 1979, Porsche unveiled a concept version of the 924 at the Frankfurt Auto show wearing Carrera badges. One year later, in 1980, Porsche released the 924 Carrera GT, making clear their intention to enter the 924 in competition. By adding an intercooler and increasing compression to 8.5:1, as well as various other little changes, Porsche was able to develop the 924 Turbo into the race car they had wanted, dubbing it the "924 Carrera GT". 406 examples (including prototypes) of the Carrera GT were built to qualify it for Group 4 racing requirements. Read More
The 911 Carrera Club Sport was Porsche refocusing on what they do best – high performance, lightweight motoring. This is probably the most underrated Porsche ever made. Manufactured between August 1987 and September 1989 only 340 cars. It had a blueprinted, high revving engine mated to a modified short-shift, close-ratio G50 gearbox. It had track-bias suspension modifications too. Read More
On 5 November 2009, Porsche officially announced the Boxster Spyder, which was the lightest Porsche on the market at the time, weighing 1,275 kg , 80 kg lighter than a Boxster S. This was achieved through the elimination of the conventional soft top's operating mechanism, the radio/PCM unit, door handles, air conditioning, storage compartments, cup holders and large LED light modules on the front fascia, although some of these could be re-added to the car in the form of options. Weight saving was also gained using aluminum doors, an aluminum rear deck and the lightest 19-inch wheels. Read More
Porsche Taycan (Base) Sport Turismo
In 2022 the base model was released in this new Sport Turismo body style. This entry-level variant in the Taycan lineup is cheaper than a 911 and Panamera, making it an interesting prospect. It gets one less motor than the Taycan 4S and less standard equipment. Horsepower and torque figures change depending on whether you get the standard 79-kWh battery or pay $5780 for the 93.4-kWh Performance Battery Plus. The bigger battery gives you 469 hp and 263 lb-ft of torque when using launch control, or 375 hp in regular operation. Read More
Porsche Cayenne Coupe
The Cayenne Coupe is a version of Porsche's largest SUV with a heavy dose of extra swagger. Porsche introduced the new variant a year after the debut of the third-generation Cayenne, for the 2020 model year. While we like the look of the coupe, it feels out of place on the base Cayenne (which is more a family SUV choice). A nice package, but we would recommend spending a bit more and going for the Cayenne S or GTS.  Read More
In 1967 Porsche prepared a small number of 934 Porsches with 935 Group 5 parts for the Trans-Am and IMSA GTO series. In the end, the 934/5 dominated the Trans-Am series by taking to top five positions in the championship. Ludwig Heimrath became the 1977 Trans-Am champion in his 934/5 by protesting Peter Gregg's highly modified car. Together they humbled the Corvette C3s and the Group 44 Jaguar XJS. Read More
One of the most confused of all Porsche is this DKS or Dreikantschaber. It might appear like a mid-engine RS61 Coupe, but it is a rebodied 356B with a rear-mounted engine. Unlike the earlier 356s, this one featured fared-in driving lights and cut-off greenhouse reminiscent of of the RS61 coupe. Porsche didn't give this new a car a name since it was homologated and considered a Carrera 2 by the FIA. It was nicknamed Dreikantschaber. Read More
The GTS returned to the lineup for 2020 after a year off. Its twin-turbo 2.9-liter V-6 makes 375 horsepower and 383 lb-ft of torque. Quickness is important in a crossover with sporting intentions, but we love the way the GTS handles and acts like a true sportscar. Apple CarPlay, available as part of the Premium package or as a standalone option, gains wireless connectivity, while wireless device charging has been added to the designated Smartphone Compartment option. Read More
In 1981 Porsche developed two 944 prototypes to succeed the 924 GTPs which raced the 1980 24 Hours of Le Mans. To coincide with the release of the 944 in fall of 1981, Porsche prepared a GTP version to promote the car before the launch. The GTP was equipped with a special Type 949 cylinder block with dry sump lubrication, KKK K28 turbocharger and an air-to-air intercooler. Read More
With the Turbo S, the PDCC Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control hydraulic roll bars came as standard. The PCCB Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes had been standard on the Turbo S already since the 996 generation. New options included the radar-based lane change assist and a lift system for the front axle (increased ground clearance by 1.6″/40 mm). The PCM now had a multi-touch screen like in the facelifted 991 Carrera. Routes and places could be visualized with 360-degree images and satellite images. Engine gets more horsepower too, now with 572 bhp and 553 ft lbs of torque. Read More
Porsche expanded the Panamera family with the addition of a new body version: The Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo. The Panamera 4 got the Sport Turismo treatment. The Panamera 4 Sport Turismos gets the same all-wheel drive system and underlying mechanicals. That means, it gets the base Panamera's 330-hp turbocharged 3.0-liter V-6. Porsche doesn't call the Sport Turismo a station wagon, but that's kinda sorta what it is. Read More
Porsche will only build 30 examples of the Clubsport 25. Mechanically, it's similar to the regular GT2 RS Clubsport. It makes the 691 horsepower from a twin-turbocharged 3.8-liter flat-six. But it gets many, many changes to the exterior and even the cooling system. As you can clearly see, the body has been lengthened, and it has also been widened. The latter is necessary to house the wide, low-offset 18-inch wheels taken from the Porsche 935, though without the aerodynamic covers. Read More
It's not often Porsche creates an all-new model in their 911 lineup. But the 997 Carrera GTS is just that. It's faster, more powerful and better looking than any other model in the Carrera family. However it's still a little less hardcore than the 911 GT3, and a lot cheaper than the 911 Turbo. The Porsche 911 Carrera GTS features a 3.8 litre flat-six engine which is tuned to develop 408 horsepower, that's 23 hp more than the Carrera S manages. Think of it as the perfectly optioned Carrera S for less money. Read More
2023 Porsche 911 Sport Classic
A total of 1,250 examples of the limited-edition model by Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur. While the original was a Carrera S, this time around, the power and handling come from a much feistier car, the Type 922 Turbo S. Returning is that amazing grey paint, that swooping ducktail spoiler, and the double-bubble roof. All-new is a mildly detuned Turbo S engine producing 543 HP and 442 lb-ft of turbocharged torque, mated to what can only be called a gift from the gods, a 7-speed manual gearbox. Read More
The new downsized flat-six gets forced induction, more power and greater efficiency, just like in the basic refreshed 911 Carrera, this time mated to a four-wheel-drive system nicked wholesale from the Turbo. Apparently one in three 911 buyers opt for a four-wheel-drive variant, so this is an important car to get right. The 3.0-liter twin-turbo flat-six in the 911 Carrera 4S is good for  414hp and 368 ft lbs of torque, helping it get from 0 to 62 mph in 4.2 sec with a manual, 4.0 seconds with the PDK and 3.6 sec with the PDK and optional Sport Chrono pack. Read More
First, there's the extra boot space, courtesy of the wagon body style. It gives the Sport Turismo models more practicality over the sedans. Also, the Panamera 4S E-Hybrid is no slouch in the power department. It combines a 443-hp V-6 with a hybrid system to crank out 552 hp. That makes it the third-most-powerful Panamera variant, behind the Turbo S E-Hybrid and the Turbo S. In full attack mode, this family hauler can punch its way to 60 mph in less than four seconds Read More
The second generation of the Panamera was introduced as a 2017 model year car and the full suite of variants was available straight out of the gates. They all got a visual update and lots of improvements across the board. The Panamera 4S featured 19” light-alloy wheels and only two colors as standard: black and white as standard. The engine was a new 2.9 L twin-turbo V6 which was good for 434 bhp @ 5650 rpm and 406 ft lbs @ 1750 rpm of torque. Read More
The Porsche Mission R concept is intended to equal the performance of the 992-series 911 GT3 Cup. It features 900-volt fast-charging architecture, an 82.0-kWh battery pack, and modularly integrated front and rear motors with single-speed transmissions featuring straight-cut gears (typical in racing) and mechanical differential locks. The front and rear motors thus provide all-wheel drive and are identical; in "qualifying mode," they produce a total output of 1,073 horsepower, whereas "race mode" delivers 671 total horsepower. The Porsche Mission R is theoretically capable of a best 0-60-mph time of about 2.5 seconds and a top speed of 186 mph or so. Read More
The first-generation Cayenne was what saved Porsche. The based Porsche Cayenne 955 entered the market to a mixed reception, although it was the performance vehicle among SUVs and had comparably good handling as well as powerful engines.[3] The lineup initially consisted of the V8-powered Cayenne S and Cayenne Turbo. Later in the model cycle, VR6 and diesel-powered versions joined the lineup. The base model is powered by a VW 3.2-L VR6 engine producing 250 PS (184 kW; 247 hp). The engine is largely the same as the VW engine. Read More
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