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The 2005 Porsche 996 Turbo S was available as both a coupe and cabriolet – it was basically a standard Turbo model with the X50 Powerkit and carbon-ceramic brakes fitted, alongside a few luxury features for the interior. Approximately 1558 Turbo S models (split between coupe and cabrio) were sold in 2005. Also included are small aluminum appointments to the interior and Turbo S badging. A great all-rounder with the extra power to surprise most. The Turbo S with manual transmission (coupé) sprints from zero to 200 km/h in 13.6 seconds. This is another 0.8 seconds faster than the 911 Turbo. Quite rare, with only a total of 600 units made. Read More
2001 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Race Car (996) (2001 - 2004)
In the 2000 FIA GT Championship, the 996 GT3 R was the dominant racer in the new N-GT class and won every run. In the same year, the factory-supported Phoenix Racing won the 24-hour race at the Nürburgring. In 2001, the modified version, now called the 996 GT3 RS, was used. The vehicle was not only very successful in its class, it also achieved overall victories. Modelled on the 911 GT3 R, the GT3 RS race cars offered a number of technical improvements, which combine to ensure a racing car with optimal competitiveness. 50 racing cars were produced. Read More
In 2002, the entire generation of the 996 was facelifted. The Carrera 4S Cabriolet was introduced in the lineup with the new engine and the Turbo bodywork. Many publications called the Carrera 4S the sweet spot in the 911 lineup when it was introduced, providing more performance than the base car without the exorbitant pricing of a Turbo or GT2. The Carrera 4S paired the aggressive bodywork and suspension of the Turbo with the base Carrera 4 drivetrain, though it didn't get the Turbo's huge rear wing. It’s easily identified by “Carrera 4S” badging and a large reflective strip on the rear end, spanning the gap between the taillights. Read More
The 996 GT3 RS was a sharpened version of the Mk.2 GT3, built for track use and it was the homologation model for the GT3 race-car. It was the forbidden fruit for the U.S. and Canadian customers. It was available in a limited number and it was a true track-oriented vehicle. It was based on the GT3 version, but with fewer comfort features and even stiffer suspension. It was the kind of car which could have been taken from the shop and dive into the first race-track. The GT3 was available in white color only, with red or blue inscriptions on its sides. The adjustable rear wing and the “duck-tail” were mounted in the back, to provide better traction on higher speeds. It was fitted with the same engine as the GT3. Read More
In 2002, all of the standard models received a minor makeover in 2002 which included Turbo-style headlights, a freshly designed front clip and an increase in engine capacity to 3.6L along with a subsequent 20HP boost. The bodies were more rigid which further improved handling and safety and the lower, stiffer X74 suspension became available as a factory modification. From the outside, it was hard to notice the difference between the 1998 version and the facelifted model. The main difference was on the headlights. Including the Mk 1 cars, the 996 Carrera Coupe sold 46,317 units. Read More
Designed as a grand tourer, the Porsche Carrera 4 Cabriolet was the base all-wheel-drive version for the open-top 911 range in 2001. It offered enough comfort to be used as a daily driver, on all weather. The 996 Porsche was facelifted in 2002. Along with the coupe versions, the convertibles were reshaped also. There was not a big difference on the outside. It was the same sports-car and open-top grand tourer. The Carrera 4 Cabriolet, continued on through 2004, receiving the same updates as the Carrera, including the 3.6-liter engine. Read More
The 996 GT3 Cup served as the basis for the 996 GT3 road car, featuring a 3.6 litre engine with 355 hp. For the 1999 season the engine output was increased to 365 hp. For the 2001 season the GT3 Cup received modified aerodynamics including an enlarged rear wing and improved cooling. For 2002, the GT3 Cup received several changes, adopting facelift 996.2 features such as Turbo-style headlights. The new body significantly improves aerodynamics and cooling. Engine output was increased to 380 hp. For 20003 onward, the power was hiked once again, with the engine now pumping out 385 bhp @ 7250 rpm and of torque 288 ft lbs @ 6500 rpm. Read More
The flat six in the Carrera 996 was a newly-developed flat-six engine that offered 300 hp. It was mated as standard with a six-speed manual. A 5-speed automatic (Tiptronic) with manual override to shift gears was on the options list. As always, the Carrera 2 was rear-wheel-drive. Designed as a grand tourer, the Porsche Carrera Cabriolet was the base version for the open-top 911 range in 1998. The retractable roof was able to be stowed away in 20 seconds at speeds of up to 50 kph (31 mph), like the rest of the 911 convertible range. With the roof up, the car was tested in the wind tunnel at speeds of up to 338 kph (210 mph). Read More
Towards the end of the 996 production run, Porsche introduced the Turbo S, boasting even more power than the standard 996 Turbo — 450 PS (331 kW) and 620 N·m (457 lb·ftf)— courtesy of the X50 package being standard. The Turbo S was limited to approximately 1,500 units worldwide, of which 598 were coupé (hardtop) and 960 were cabriolet (convertible). It was available with a 6-speed manual or an automatic (Tiptronic S) transmission, driving power to all four wheels. The basic price is EUR 122,500 for the Turbo S Coupé or EUR 131,100 for the Turbo S Convertible. Sprints from zero to 200 km/h in 13.6 seconds. Read More
Porsche 911 Turbo X50 (996)
The optional X50 Performance Package gave the base Turbo larger K24 turbochargers and intercoolers, a revised ECU and a quad-pipe exhaust, raising the engine’s output from 415 to 450 bhp and maximum torque from 415 to 457 ft lbs. With power at 450 bhp @ 6000 rpm and torque of 457 ft lbs @ 4400 rpm, the X50 option is a monsters. Porsche engineers achieved the increase in power and performance through modifications to the Turbo charger, the change air cooler, the control units and exhaust system in particular. The base constructions of the manual and automatic transmissions were also improved. Read More
To commemorate the 40th year of 911 production, Porsche built 1963 of the 40th Anniversary Porsche 911 Carrera for model year 2004. Painted only in a GT Silver Metallic finish, with a dark gray leather interior, the 40th Anniversary (or 40 Jahre in German) took the Base Model 996 Carrera and added the front fascia of the 996 Turbo, side skirts and luxury features for the cabin – including a luggage set that matched the special grey leather interior. Mechanically, the X51 Powerkit increases power to 341hp, combined with rear wheels power wheels, a standard 6-speed manual and sport suspension and limited-slip differential included. Read More
The 996 Cabriolet was introduced in March 1998 at the Geneva Motor Show. The 996 Cabriolet was long ready (remember, it was tested already in 1995), but for marketing and production-related reasons it was launched in 1998 as a 1999 model. While the evolution with the 911 coupe was questionable from 993 to 996, the real evolution came with the cabriolet. In USA - the biggest market - 911 Cabriolets outsold the Coupés. The all-wheel-drive system provides between 5-40% of torque to the front wheels depending on the situation. Read More
The 996 was initially available in a coupé or a cabriolet (Convertible) bodystyle with rear-wheel drive, and later with four-wheel drive, utilising a 3.4 litre flat-6 engine generating a maximum power output of 221 kW (300 PS; 296 hp).[7] The 996 had the same front end as the entry-level Boxster. After requests from the Carrera owners about their premium cars looking like a "lower priced car that looked just like theirs did", Porsche redesigned the headlamps of the Carrera in 2002. With the cabriolet, buyers have a choice between this version and the hotter Carrera 4S cabriolet. Read More
In 1999, Porsche celebrated the turn of the century with a special edition – the 996 "Millennium Edition". The 911 Millennium edition was based on the Carrera 4 coupé and was pretty rare, with only 911 cars made. Based on the Carrera 4, the "Millennium Edition" was limited to 911 examples and was based exclusively on the wide bodied Carrera 4. This special edition was finished in Violet Chromaflair paint, which, depending on the light changes from dark violet to light green and is quite spectacular to look at. It also got a caramel-colored leather interior and polished "turbo-twist" wheels. Read More
The 996 series was a monumental update to the 911 story. The Type 996 introduced water-cooled engines and it also ushered in a new body design. The roof line with a windscreen which is around five degrees flatter gives the side view a more fluid look. Gone was the "classic" 911 design, the entire main body now much sleeker. The flat six in the Carrera 996 was a newly-developed flat-six engine that offered 300 hp. It was mated as standard with a six-speed manual. A 5-speed automatic (Tiptronic) with manual override to shift gears was on the options list. As always, the Carrera 2 was rear-wheel-drive. Read More
The 996 GT3 R was a one-year-only (2000 model year) special of which only 63 were produced. The car took the basic GT3 bones and amplified it for motorsport. The Mezger engine produced over 400 horsepower, while factory-fitted adjustable shock absorbers gave better handling. Most notably, the GT3 R wore carbon-fiber bodywork meant for ultimate light weight in motorsport. The 996 GT3 R was introduced in 1999 as a replacement for the 993 RSR. Before its introduction, it was extensively tested at Weissach and Paul Ricard. In the 2000 FIA GT Championship, the 996 GT3 R was in the N-GT class and won every run. Won the 24-hour race at the Nürburgring.  Read More
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