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The 996 Cabriolet was introduced in March 1998 at the Geneva Motor Show. The 996 Cabriolet was long ready (remember, it was tested already in 1995), but for marketing and production-related reasons it was launched in 1998 as a 1999 model. While the evolution with the 911 coupe was questionable from 993 to 996, the real evolution came with the cabriolet. In USA - the biggest market - 911 Cabriolets outsold the Coupés. The all-wheel-drive system provides between 5-40% of torque to the front wheels depending on the situation. Read More
Based on the road-going 996 911 GT3 RS, the GT3 RSR features improvements to its predecessor in all key areas. The vehicle is available in an ACO (Automobile Club de l'Ouest) version for competing in Le Mans and in the American Le Mans Series as well as in a FIA specification. The 911 GT3 RSR features a modified front which improves downforce at the front axle. The 3.6-litre, six-cylinder boxer engine delivers 445 hp at 8,250 revs. Maximum torque is now 405 Nm at 7,200 rpm, with top revs reached at 8,500 (for the FIA specification with two 30.8 mm air restrictors). Race cars never got more exciting than this. Read More
The 996 series was a monumental update to the 911 story. The Type 996 introduced water-cooled engines and it also ushered in a new body design. The roof line with a windscreen which is around five degrees flatter gives the side view a more fluid look. Gone was the "classic" 911 design, the entire main body now much sleeker. The flat six in the Carrera 996 was a newly-developed flat-six engine that offered 300 hp. It was mated as standard with a six-speed manual. A 5-speed automatic (Tiptronic) with manual override to shift gears was on the options list. As always, the Carrera 2 was rear-wheel-drive. Read More
In 2002, the entire generation of the 996 was facelifted. The Carrera 4S Cabriolet was introduced in the lineup with the new engine and the Turbo bodywork. Many publications called the Carrera 4S the sweet spot in the 911 lineup when it was introduced, providing more performance than the base car without the exorbitant pricing of a Turbo or GT2. The Carrera 4S paired the aggressive bodywork and suspension of the Turbo with the base Carrera 4 drivetrain, though it didn't get the Turbo's huge rear wing. It’s easily identified by “Carrera 4S” badging and a large reflective strip on the rear end, spanning the gap between the taillights. Read More
Designed as a grand tourer, the Porsche Carrera 4 Cabriolet was the base all-wheel-drive version for the open-top 911 range in 2001. It offered enough comfort to be used as a daily driver, on all weather. The 996 Porsche was facelifted in 2002. Along with the coupe versions, the convertibles were reshaped also. There was not a big difference on the outside. It was the same sports-car and open-top grand tourer. The Carrera 4 Cabriolet, continued on through 2004, receiving the same updates as the Carrera, including the 3.6-liter engine. Read More
In 2002, the standard Carrera models underwent a facelift. In addition, engine capacity was also increased to 3.6-litres across the range, with power up slightly on the naturally aspirated models. 2002 also marked the start of the production of the 996 based Targa model, with a sliding glass "green house" roof system as introduced on its predecessor. It also features a rear glass hatch which gave the driver access to the storage compartment. The 996 Targa is the rarest bodystyle in the series – only 5,152 were produced (all Mk.2 generation) between 2002 and 2005. Read More
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