Join The World's Fastest Growing Porsche Community >>
Porsche made its first and most significant changes to the 930 for 1978 model year, enlarging the engine bore by 2 mm (0.08 in) to a total displacement of 3,299 cc (3.3 L; 201.3 cu in) and adding an air-to-air intercooler. The suspension benefitted from new anti-roll bars, firmer shocks and larger diameter rear torsion bars. While the increase in displacement increased power output and torque, it also increased the weight of the vehicle, which contributed to a substantial change in the handling and character of the car compared to the Earlier 3.0-Litre Models. Read More
The 911 Turbo was put into production in 1975. While the original purpose of the 911 Turbo was to gain homologation for the 1976 racing season, it quickly became popular among car enthusiasts. Ernst Fuhrmann adapted the turbo-technology originally developed for the 917/30 CAN-AM car and applied it to the 3.0 litre flat-six used in the Carrera RS 3.0, thus creating what Porsche internally dubbed as the 930. Total power output from the engine was 260 bhp and 254 ft lbs of torque. Read More
Introducing this new top-of-the-range model, Porsche is once again placing a 911 Turbo Cabriolet right at the top of the family after a break of 14 years: From 1987 - 1989 the Porsche 930, as the first Turbo was code-named within the Company, set the first milestone in the history of these outstanding open-air sports cars. With cylinders still featuring two valves each at the time, the 3.3-litre power unit driving the first Turbo Cabriolet offered maximum output quite unique at the time of 300 bhp or 221 kW. Acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h was in 5.2 seconds and the car had a top speed of 260 km/h or 161 mph. Read More
The Porsche factory had 93 Turbo chassis left. These were all transferred to Porsche Exclusiv and hand built as the very special 964 Turbo 3.6 S. They were offered with normal, or ‘Flachbau’ slant nose front ends. While the vast majority of Turbo S’ were fitted with the ‘Flachbau’ nose as a no-cost option, the Turbo S could also be had with the traditional 964 nose as well. In all, 76 Flatnose cars were made while 17 non-Flatnose (known as Package option) cars were made. These cars were also fitted with the X88 option, which increased power to 380 hp. 75 flatnose units were produced. Read More
The Turbo-look Porsche 964 has always been a very desirable automobile, among them 1,532 Carrera 2 Cabriolets constructed worldwide. Within that group, there were some cars that were even more specialized. The Register says six Turbo-look cabriolets were pulled off the production line in Zuffenhausen and transported to the Porsche Exclusive shop in Weissach. Three of these six powerful and luxuriously equipped drop-tops were equipped with left-hand drive for buyers in Germany (Code C00), and the other three were fitted with right-hand drive Read More
Porsche 911 Turbo S2 (964) (1992)
A forgotten part of the 964s history is the Turbo S2. It was built to adhere to homologation rules so Porsche could participate in IMSA's sports car racing series. IMSA's homologation rules meant that Porsche had to build at least 200 road-going versions of the participating car, 20 of which needed to share most of the primary components of the race car. The 911 Turbo S2 was built specifically for this purpose and exclusively for the United States and Canada. The 20 homologation specials left the factory as stock 964 Turbos, heading immediately to California-based tuner for "S2" engine upgrades. Read More
19 non 'slant nose' or Package cars were made for the USA only. Very rare. The Porsche factory had 93 Turbo chassis left. These were all transferred to Porsche Exclusiv and hand built as the very special 964 Turbo 3.6 S. They were offered with normal, or ‘Flachbau’ slant nose front ends. While the vast majority of Turbo S’ were fitted with the ‘Flachbau’ nose as a no-cost option, the Turbo S could also be had with the traditional 964 nose as well. In all, 76 Flatnose cars were made while 17 non-Flatnose (known as Package option) cars were made. These cars were also fitted with the X88 option, which increased power to 380 hp. Read More
Engine based on modified 3.6 litre 964 unit. Speedline wheels with big red brake calipers. Lessons learned in the Carrera Cup series proved the reliability of the new 3.6-litre engine. An additional three millimetres on the bore and two millimetres on the stroke, resulted in an increase in capacity of 300 cc. Combined with the turbo optimised cylinders, pistons and crank train, and an increase in the compression ratio from 7.0 to 7.5:1, this helped to boost power to 360 bhp. Torque was increased significantly to 520 Nm at 4200 rpm, up from 450 Nm at 4500 rpm in the earlier car. Read More
All Porsche 911s are turbocharged these days but the Turbo model is something special. It gets the twin-turbo 3.7-liter flat six with tons of power and a huge $33,000 savings over the Turbo S. Thanks to an output of 573 hp, marking an increase of 32 hp over the predecessor, the new 911 Turbo Cabriolet accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 2.8 seconds (0.2 seconds faster than before). The Turbo Cabriolet basically handles like a coupe. Read More
It would be a disservice to call this new Turbo a "lesser" car than the Turbo S, but it does have less in most departments. Less power at 573 HP. Less features compared to the jam-packed Turbo S. Most importantly, less money required to put one in your garage. This also is not to say that the new Turbo isn't anything short of a monster. It will still go 0 to 60 in 2.8 seconds, will corner like it was on rails with Porsche Torque Management (PTM) all-wheel-drive. Read More
Porsche made a lightweight version of the Turbo simply known as the Tuubo S. This used the spartan appointments of the Carrera RS with an upgraded version of the Turbo engine. Some cars received graphics on the side celebrating IMSA Supercar Championship. Similar to the Carrera RS, the Turbo S had no power steering, air conditioning, airbags, central locking, alarm system, rear window wiper, smaller window washer reservoir, smaller horn, and had thin-gauge glass. The engine used a second oil cooler and slightly higher boost to improve overall performance. Read More
The 1989/90 change of model year saw the launch of the Porsche 911, 964 series onto the market. This 911 model was initially available as a Coupe, Targa and Convertible. From model year 1991 onwards Porsche also introduced its top-of-the-line model - the Turbo - into this series. In spite of bearing a major similarity in terms of look to the naturally-aspirated model, the extended wings remained. This meant that the new Porsche could retain its turbo look. The 964 Turbo model was the successor to the Porsche 930. The 964 Turbo was the end of an era, the last of the single turbo rear-wheel drive 911 Turbos. Read More
The Cabriolet version of the 991.2 Turbo got the same updates as its coupe sibling. The engine in the 991.2 911 Turbo Cabriolet is a twin-turbocharged flat-six with 540 horsepower and 523 pound-feet of torque, up a decent 20 more horses versus the 991.1 Turbo Cab. Improvements that come from increases in boost and fuel-injection pressures. Rounding the skidpad, the Turbo posts 1.02 g’s relatively easily. The wide P Zeros in back and the standard four-wheel steering conspire to hide the fact that 62 percent of the Turbo’s 3656 pounds sits over the rear wheels. 0 - 60 mph is over in just 3 seconds. Read More
At the heart of the 991.2 911 Turbo is a twin-turbocharged flat-six with 540 horsepower and 523 pound-feet of torque. That’s a meaningful 20 more horses than the 991.1 Turbo. Improvements that come from increases in boost and fuel-injection pressures. Rounding the skidpad, the Turbo posts 1.02 g’s relatively easily. The wide P Zeros in back and the standard four-wheel steering conspire to hide the fact that 62 percent of the Turbo’s 3656 pounds sits over the rear wheels. With sport-plus selected, the 991.2 Turbo hits a 1.0-second run to 30 mph and a 2.6-second zero-to-60 time. Read More
The 2005 Porsche 996 Turbo S was available as both a coupe and cabriolet – it was basically a standard Turbo model with the X50 Powerkit and carbon-ceramic brakes fitted, alongside a few luxury features for the interior. Approximately 1558 Turbo S models (split between coupe and cabrio) were sold in 2005. Also included are small aluminum appointments to the interior and Turbo S badging. A great all-rounder with the extra power to surprise most. The Turbo S with manual transmission (coupé) sprints from zero to 200 km/h in 13.6 seconds. This is another 0.8 seconds faster than the 911 Turbo. Quite rare, with only a total of 600 units made. Read More
Porsche 911 Turbo X50 (996)
The optional X50 Performance Package gave the base Turbo larger K24 turbochargers and intercoolers, a revised ECU and a quad-pipe exhaust, raising the engine’s output from 415 to 450 bhp and maximum torque from 415 to 457 ft lbs. With power at 450 bhp @ 6000 rpm and torque of 457 ft lbs @ 4400 rpm, the X50 option is a monsters. Porsche engineers achieved the increase in power and performance through modifications to the Turbo charger, the change air cooler, the control units and exhaust system in particular. The base constructions of the manual and automatic transmissions were also improved. Read More
The heart of this most exclusive high-performance athlete is of course a six-cylinder boxer boosted by two exhaust gas turbochargers with variable turbine geometry, with an increase in power over the 911 Turbo by 30 to 530 bhp (390 kW). Maximum torque is a most impressive 700 Newton-metres (516 lb-ft). At the same time this new top model comes as standard with all high-tech components available only as options on the “regular” 911 Turbo. The 911 Turbo S comes exclusively with seven-speed Porsche-Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK) conveying drive power to PTM all-wheel drive. Read More
Towards the end of the 996 production run, Porsche introduced the Turbo S, boasting even more power than the standard 996 Turbo — 450 PS (331 kW) and 620 N·m (457 lb·ftf)— courtesy of the X50 package being standard. The Turbo S was limited to approximately 1,500 units worldwide, of which 598 were coupé (hardtop) and 960 were cabriolet (convertible). It was available with a 6-speed manual or an automatic (Tiptronic S) transmission, driving power to all four wheels. The basic price is EUR 122,500 for the Turbo S Coupé or EUR 131,100 for the Turbo S Convertible. Sprints from zero to 200 km/h in 13.6 seconds. Read More
The 993 Turbo S, available between 1997 and 1998, bumped the power from the standard 993 Turbo up to 450hp (430 for the United States market) with larger turbochargers and a modified engine management system. The Turbo S was fitted with more luxury trim bits on the interior – with more leather and carbon fiber than on the standard Turbo. A larger rear wing was installed as well. Only 345 were built. Its direct successor was the 996 Turbo S for model year 2005. Read More
Only 50 units made. The 911 Turbo Limited Edition comes equipped with the 330 bhp power unit normally only available in the 911 Turbo with Sport Equipment. In addition, the fitment of a limited slip differential as standard ensures the the increased engine performance can be used to it’s fullest extent. This Limited Edition also adopts the rear wheel air intakes of the Sport Equipment version. Essentially an SE without a slantnose front. Read More
The 993 Turbo was available between late 1995 to 1998. Powered by a twin-turbocharged 3.6 liter flat six, it was rated at 402-horsepower. It’s distinguished easily from the rear, as the whale-tail spoiler is quite deep to house the intercoolers meant to cool the intake charge. This extra power might have been a handful for street drivers, so all-wheel drive from the 993 Carrera 4 added traction at all four corners. Approximately 6,000 coupes were made. Although powered by a different engine, a limited production 993 Turbo Cabriolet was available in the early days of the 993 generation. A more powerful 993 Turbo S was also introduced in 1997. Read More
Porsche introduced the turbocharged version of the Type 996 for the 2001 model year (late 2000 in Europe). Like the 996 GT3, the Turbo's engine was derived from the engine used in the 911 GT1. Like its predecessor, the 993 Turbo, it featured twin-turbos but now had a power output of 420 PS (309 kW; 414 hp). As of 2002, the X50 package would increase engine output to 444 hp. The 996 Turbo was available with a 6-speed manual transmission or an automatic (Tiptronic), driving power to all four wheels. This is a great great car. Read More
The 2014 Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet is a great companion to its coupe sibling. The Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet delivers the same blend of dynamism, performance and efficiency offered by the Coupe. The turbocharged 3.8-litre six-cylinder engine delivers 520 bhp and it helps drivers accelerate from zero to 60 mph in just 3.1 seconds (there goes your hair style). Compared to the 997.2 Turbo Cabriolet the new Turbo Cab delivers 30 bhp more power and are 0.2 seconds faster in terms of their standard acceleration. It is also up to 15% more efficient and more luxurious and comfortable to boot. Read More
The 2014 Porsche 911 Turbo is a technological extravaganza. Adaptive aerodynamics, four-wheel steering, torque vectoring, active four-wheel drive, adaptive dampers, launch control, twin-clutch automatic gearbox – you get the picture. This is the first time we've had a chance to sample all of this on British roads. Two versions are available; both are powered by an uprated version of the previous 911 Turbo's 3.8-litre twin-turbo flat-six engine. The new 911 Turbo has even more power and more electronic systems. It is still a straight-line monster that will blow you away in terms of the sheer might of that engine and traction. Read More
Porsche 993 Turbo Cabrio
The Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet (993 generation) is an incredibly rare car – only 14 were built in 1995, in the early days of 993 production. Rather than the contemporary twin-turbo powerplant in the 993 Turbo Coupe, the 993 Turbo Cab was fitted with the single turbo of the 964 Turbo 3.6. Although the Turbo Coupé was introduced earlier, the actual production started after the Turbo Cabriolets were sold. Turbo Cabriolets were 1995 models by VIN and Turbo Coupés were immediately produced as 1996 models although the 1996 model year had not yet started. Read More
The 997.2 Turbo was introduced for the 2010 model year and received a new 3.8 litre engine capable of 493 horsepower, a significant evolution as compared to the 473hp in the 997.1 Turbo. The 997.2 Turbo was available in both manual and automatic transmissions, but the automatic evolved from the Tiptronic used in its predecessor, to a sportier dual-clutch PDK. Approximately 3,300 coupes were produced and 1,800 cabrios, far less than its predecessor. An epic all-around GT with more performance than you could ever need. Read More
The 997.2 Turbo was introduced for the 2010 model year and received a new 3.8 litre engine capable of 493 horsepower, a significant evolution as compared to the 473hp in the 997.1 Turbo. The 997.2 Turbo was available in both manual and automatic transmissions, but the automatic evolved from the Tiptronic used in its predecessor, to a sportier dual-clutch PDK. Approximately 3,300 coupes were produced and 1,800 cabrios, far less than its predecessor. An epic all-around GT with more performance than you could ever need. Read More
Like the 911 Turbo Coupe, the 997 Turbo Cabriolet is powered by a 3.6 liter six-cylinder boxer engine with biturbo turbocharging and Variable Turbine Geometry (VTG). The powerplant already generates 480 hp (473 bhp) and 460 ft lbs of torque at 1950 rpm. The manual transmission version can accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in just four seconds while the Tiptronic S the time can be cut to 3.6 seconds. Top speed for the Cab is the same 193 mph as Coupe and only weighs 70 kilos. Read More
The sixth generation of the 911 series’ top-of-the-range model was unveiled at the 2006 Geneva Motor Show. The 997 911 Turbo has 473 bhp @ 6000 rpm, 60 bhp more than its predecessor. Rated torque is now 473 bhp @ 6000 rpm. The speed range in which this power is available has also been extended. While the previous model’s maximum torque was available between 2,700 and 4,600 revolutions per minute, the corresponding figures are now 1,950 to 5,000 revs. 0 to 60 mph is over in a blistering 3.6 seconds and top speed is 193 mph. The ultimate GT. Read More
Everything you need to know about the 991.1 Turbo S Cab comes from Car and Driver test results. "Launch control puts the computer in charge and sends the 3741-pound Turbo S Cab to the far side of 60 mph in just 2.8 seconds. A quarter-mile that nearly breaks into the 10s—11.1 seconds at 124 mph—attests to how serious this car gets when provoked. We saw 1.0 g on the skidpad and a stopping distance of 151 feet, both strong numbers abetted by the hilariously staggered Pirelli P Zeros (245/35 in front, 305/30 in back)". This is in a comfortable, all-wheel drive, grand touring convertible. Read More
Porsche offered the 991 Turbo S from the start of the production of the 991 Turbo. The unique features of the Turbo S were the GT3 mirrors, slightly different front spoiler grilles and interior features. As before, the Turbo S was a heavily equipped version of the Turbo. The powerkit added 29 KW of power and the following equipment came as standard: PDCC hydraulic rollbar system, Sport Chrono (Launch control and 0.15 bar overboost functions), dynamic engine mounts, PCCB Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes, central lock wheels, full LED dynamic headlights, 18-way Sport Plus seats with memory. Read More
Just 50 ‘C16’ cars were manufactured for the UK-market, initially equipped with an uprated engine of 330bhp (from 300) mated to a 4-speed transmission. However, at the end of 1988, the uprated 5-Speed G50 gearbox was introduced, dramatically easing the peaks in power delivery by reducing the effects of ‘turbo-lag’. The factory SE also benefited from a dual-exit exhaust system, limited-slip differential, heated front seats and a sunroof. Read More
Slantnosed and based on that of the 935 racecars, with pop-up headlamps. The front spoiler was made deeper in order to accommodate the extra oil cooler, while intakes in the rear wings fed air to the brakes. The larger turbocharger and four-outlet exhaust gave 30bhp of extra power. Porsche began their “special order program” offering a Flachbau option (Slantnose) for the 930 in very limited production. All of this at a cost of nearly 2 times the standard 930S. Read More
The first road-going 911 Turbo was not the familiar 930 that entered production in February 1975. Nor was it the engine-less prototype that had appeared at the Paris Motor Show in October 1973. Instead, it was a one-off narrow-bodied mule that was subsequently gifted to Ferry Porsche’s sister, Louise, on her 70th birthday in August 1974. Built on chassis 9115600042, this 2.7 Carrera Turbo also pre-dated the prototype 930 that was shown in almost production-ready at Frankfurt show in 1974. Read More
For 1974 both the 911 Carrera RSR 3.0 and RSR Turbo 2.1 were created - the 3.0L for the customer teams and the 2.1 turbo for Porsche’s own team. The 911 Carrera RSR Turbo 2.1 developed 338-368 kW in power, but as the engine was small, the turbo lag was big and it wasn’t as easy to drive out of the corners as it was with the 3-litre normally aspirated car. Weight reduction measures included plastic hoods, fender flares and doors and an aluminium safety cage. Read More
In the 1970s Porsche was serious about turbocharging and this prototype signaled the way for later cars like the 930 and the RSR 3.0. It was also the one of the very first show cars fitted with the wide body, large alloy wheels, whale tail and a turbocharged version of the flat-6. All these details eventually appeared on the 911 RSR 3.0-liter race car of 1974. The show car was built from a standard 911S fixed with a radical body kit. Read More
Become A Full Fledged Member
No Pesky Ads. Full Access to Featured Content. Awesome Discounts on Products