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In 1963 Porsche introduced their seminal 901 at the 911 at the Frankfurt Motor Show which would be renamed 911 for the 1964 model year. The new car was sold alongside the 356C as an alternative with more power and room for a rear seat. At the 1963 Frankfurt show the public saw Porsches new direction. Compared to the 356 it had a longer wheelbase, a more compact suspension setup and much more power from the flat-6 engine. Read More
Southern California Porsche dealer Johnny von Neumann knew what his customers wanted, and a Targa top Targa 911 wasn’t it. With Porsche’s approval, he hired designer Nuccio Bertone to create a one-off 1966 Porsche 911 Spyder, in hopes of launching low-volume production. Just one example was constructed.  The engine incorporated a vertically-mounted cooling fan, a 9.1:1 compression ratio and two triple-choke 40PI Solex carburettors. Peak output was 130bhp at 6100rpm and 174lb-ft at 4200rpm. Transmission was via a Type 901 five-speed gearbox and single-plate clutch. Read More
In the 1970s Porsche was serious about turbocharging and this prototype signaled the way for later cars like the 930 and the RSR 3.0. It was also the one of the very first show cars fitted with the wide body, large alloy wheels, whale tail and a turbocharged version of the flat-6. All these details eventually appeared on the 911 RSR 3.0-liter race car of 1974. The show car was built from a standard 911S fixed with a radical body kit. Read More
Based on the 911S, the 911 R was produced by Porsche to compete in the FIA’s GT 2.0 category. To make it competitive, the 911R was powered by a flat-six engine, Type 901/22 from the Porsche 906, capable of 210 hp. It went on a diet too, with weight savings coming from everywhere, getting the 911 R down to just 1,800 pounds dry. Four prototypes were constructed after which Porsche had coachbuilder Karl Baur build another 20 customer cars. In the end, because of the modifications to the 911R, the FIA refused to homologate the car. Read More
To homologate the 1968 911 for competition purposes, Porsche began with the Spartan 911 T which were a full 54 kg (118 pounds) lighter than their 'S' siblings. Porsche offered clients the opportunity to buy a 911 T outfitted with competition equipment directly from the factory, and the resulting cars have become known as the 911 T/R. They were built in low quantities to a range of specifications depending on their intended competition purposes. Read More
Porsche developed the S/T, of which 33 were built in 1970 and 1971, taking full advantage of new FIA rules allowing a two-inch wider track. Accordingly, wheel arches were widened to accommodate seven-inch front and nine-inch rear wheels. Weight reduction was even more radical, including thinner-gauge steel for the roof and floorpans. Heating ducts, seat slide supports, the glove-box lid, ashtray, sun visors and rear torsion-bar covers were deleted. Read More
Porsche 911 Carrera RSR 2.8
Introduced in 1973, the RSR was a factory-built racing car based on the 911 chassis. The Porsche 911 Carrera RSR 2.8 was the first 911 to ever wear the RSR badge. Homologated for racing by the iconic 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS, the RSR’s racing career got off to the perfect start thanks to Brumos Racing’s overall triumph in the 1973 24 Hours of Daytona, while a factory car won the latest ever Targa Florio road race. For the privateer in the mid-1970s who wanted to go sports car racing this was the chosen weapon. Read More
For 1974 both the 911 Carrera RSR 3.0 and RSR Turbo 2.1 were created - the 3.0L for the customer teams and the 2.1 turbo for Porsche’s own team. The 911 Carrera RSR Turbo 2.1 developed 338-368 kW in power, but as the engine was small, the turbo lag was big and it wasn’t as easy to drive out of the corners as it was with the 3-litre normally aspirated car. Weight reduction measures included plastic hoods, fender flares and doors and an aluminium safety cage. Read More
Porsche-911-Carrera-RSR-3.0
For the 1974 racing season 911 Carrera RSR 3.0 (246 kW) and RSR Turbo 2.1 (338+ kW) were created - the 3.0L for the customer teams and the 2.1 turbo for Porsche’s own team. The Carrera RSR 3.0 was made in small numbers for racing. The 3.0 RSR would go on to become the most successful Group 4 racing car of its time thanks to its combination of low weight, immense Porsche 917 brakes, impeccable handling, and a 330+hp naturally aspirated flat-6. Read More
In 1978, the works team fields two 911 SC at the East African Safari Rally. The name of game is to survive 5,000 kilometres of the toughest tracks in sweltering heat and torrential rain. The conditions take their toll: of the 72 starters, 13 reach the finish line. Martini Racing Porsche System Engineering signs on two specialists to drive: Sweden’s Björn Waldegård (Start No. 5) and Kenyan Vic Preston Jnr (Start No. 14). Read More
Röhrl and Geistdörfer very nearly won that San Remo Rally, after a comeback that would have been one for the ages. Röhrl and Geistdörfer were up against a field of faster, more powerful four-wheel-drive cars in their rear-wheel-drive Porsche 911 SC, and somehow managed to pull within an eyelash of victory. Unfortunately, a broken driveshaft forced the pair to retire, leaving Michele Mouton's Audi Quattro to run away with the race. Read More
Built so that the factory Rothmans Porsche Rally Team could hit the international stage, the SC RS used the Turbo’s body with fibreglass bumpers and aluminium doors. In Autumn 1983, Porsche presents the 911 SC/RS for motor racing. The engine originates from the 911 SC, with improved performance achieved by the mechanical ball fuel injection, increased compression, the cylinder heads from the 935 and forged pistons. Racing seats are fitted in place of the standard seats. Read More
The Porsche 953 ranks as one of the finest off-roaders Porsche has ever made. It was basically a souped-up 911 designed specially to give Porsche an advantage in the 1984 Paris–Dakar Rally. Just a year later, it was replaced by the 959. Despite its brief run, it still managed to make quite the impression. Built around a massively enhanced suspension and a supremely powerful 300 bhp (224 kW), 6-cylinder engine, it showed Porsche knew more than just sportscars. Read More
Introduced in 1989 (the year of the 911’s 25th anniversary), the 964 Carrera 4 was a significant new model for the company, but the 4-wheel drive system was deemed unsuitable for the company’s racing series. Manufactured alongside the Carrera 4 at the same time was the more traditional rear-wheel drive Carrera 2, but this model’s launch was only planned for a year later, in the hope that it would not detract from potential sales of the Carrera 4. The 1990 season was the first season that saw the 911-based model become the pillar on which the Porsche Carrera Cup series has been established. Read More
For race teams and track day customers Porsche prepared a small number of the 964 Cup cars according to the FIA NG-T regulations. Officially called the Competition model, these custom-ordered cars were an intermediary step between the Carrera Cup option (M001) and the standard tourer (M002). This M0003 option was available directly from Porsche as a road-going model. These cars had almost all the Carrera Cup modifications including the new suspension. This lowered the car by 40mm in the rear and 50mm in the front. It also included fitting of the larger 930 Turbo disc brakes and adjustable anti-roll bars. Read More
With the 1993 Carrera 2 as the starting point, Porsche had to make at least 50 roadgoing cars in order to qualify this new model for the Carrera ADAC GT Cup, which served as the basis for a motor racing variant to come, the Carrera RSR 3.8. The RSR 3.8 was nothing short of an all-out race car that could be delivered to the track in a ‘just add driver’ form. The Porsche Carrera RSR 3.8 racked up a catalogue of impressive international race results right from the outset, winning overall at the Spa 24 Hours, Suzuka 1000km, and the 24 Hours of Interlagos. Read More
Porsche 911 Cup 3.8 (993) (1994 - 1998)
The 993 Carrera Cup 3.8 was developed from the 993 Carrera RS, as purpose-built competition car designed by Porsche for its single-model racing series taking place around the world. Replacing the 964 Carrera Cup, the 993 Carrera Cup had a claimed 315 bhp on tap, weighed only 1,100kg, and offered a top speed of around 270km/h (170mph). Approximately 216 samples were built. The Carrera Cup should not be confused witth the Carrera RSR, or the 993 Carrera RS Clubsport version. Read More
The racing sportscar is prepared by Porsche following the Le Mans GT2 regulations for the over 1,150 kg weight classification. It features a 3.6-litre engine with two turbo-chargers (KKK 24 with 33.8 mm restrictors), which delivers around 450 hp at 5,750 rpm. Even this racing vehicle, with its suspension featuring a McPherson front axle and Porsche multi-link rear axle with LSA system, closely resembles its production relative. Utilizing a steel 993 Twin Turbo chassis with modifications for racing, scored numerous victories in a wide variety of racing venues. Read More
In spite of its 911 moniker, the car actually had very little in common with the 911 of the time, only sharing the front and rear headlamps with the production sports car. Designed and developed to compete in the GT1 class of sportscar racing, which also required a street-legal version for homologation purposes. It was powered by a twin-turbo flat 6 that was good for 600 bhp. The 1996 911 GT1 clocked at a top speed of exactly 330 km/h (205 mph) on the legendary Mulsanne Straight. Read More
The 993 Carrera RSR takes the 993 Carrera RS formula and makes it even more track-ready by adding a roll-cage and removing carpet, power windows, and a/c. There were just thirty Porsche 911 Cup 3.8 RSR (Type 993) race cars produced for the 1997 season. This model was the last of the breed of air-cooled, naturally-aspirated 911 race cars to come from the Weissach race department before the introduction of the Type 996 water-cooled cars. To find a 993 3.8 RSR that participated in some of the world’s toughest endurance races in period, and survived unscathed and unmolested, is quite rare. Read More
Towards the end of the 1996 season, Porsche made revisions to the 911 GT1 in preparation for the 1997 season. The front end of the car was revised including new bodywork which featured headlamps that previewed the all-new generation of the (996) Porsche 911 which would be unveiled in 1997. It had the same engine as the previous version, but new aerodynamic elements allowed the 1997 version to be considerably faster than the 1996 version. At Le Mans the works cars led the race but did not last the full distance; a privately entered 1996 specification GT1 managed 5th overall and third in its class. Read More
The 1998 GT1 car was a totally rethink and vast upgrade versus the prior year car. 1998 Le Mans 24-hour race In the 1998 jubilee year, the Porsche team celebrated its 16th overall victory in Le Mans with a double win for the 911 GT1 98. On 6th/7th June, the winning car was driven by Laurent Aiello, Allan McNish and Stéphane Ortelli. It was almost 50 years to the day on which the first Porsche sports car saw the light of day. Read More
The 996 GT3 Cup served as the basis for the 996 GT3 road car, featuring a 3.6 litre engine with 355 hp. For the 1999 season the engine output was increased to 365 hp. For the 2001 season the GT3 Cup received modified aerodynamics including an enlarged rear wing and improved cooling. For 2002, the GT3 Cup received several changes, adopting facelift 996.2 features such as Turbo-style headlights. The new body significantly improves aerodynamics and cooling. Engine output was increased to 380 hp. For 20003 onward, the power was hiked once again, with the engine now pumping out 385 bhp @ 7250 rpm and of torque 288 ft lbs @ 6500 rpm. Read More
The 996 GT3 R was a one-year-only (2000 model year) special of which only 63 were produced. The car took the basic GT3 bones and amplified it for motorsport. The Mezger engine produced over 400 horsepower, while factory-fitted adjustable shock absorbers gave better handling. Most notably, the GT3 R wore carbon-fiber bodywork meant for ultimate light weight in motorsport. The 996 GT3 R was introduced in 1999 as a replacement for the 993 RSR. Before its introduction, it was extensively tested at Weissach and Paul Ricard. In the 2000 FIA GT Championship, the 996 GT3 R was in the N-GT class and won every run. Won the 24-hour race at the Nürburgring.  Read More
2001 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Race Car (996) (2001 - 2004)
In the 2000 FIA GT Championship, the 996 GT3 R was the dominant racer in the new N-GT class and won every run. In the same year, the factory-supported Phoenix Racing won the 24-hour race at the Nürburgring. In 2001, the modified version, now called the 996 GT3 RS, was used. The vehicle was not only very successful in its class, it also achieved overall victories. Modelled on the 911 GT3 R, the GT3 RS race cars offered a number of technical improvements, which combine to ensure a racing car with optimal competitiveness. 50 racing cars were produced. Read More
Based on the road-going 996 911 GT3 RS, the GT3 RSR features improvements to its predecessor in all key areas. The vehicle is available in an ACO (Automobile Club de l'Ouest) version for competing in Le Mans and in the American Le Mans Series as well as in a FIA specification. The 911 GT3 RSR features a modified front which improves downforce at the front axle. The 3.6-litre, six-cylinder boxer engine delivers 445 hp at 8,250 revs. Maximum torque is now 405 Nm at 7,200 rpm, with top revs reached at 8,500 (for the FIA specification with two 30.8 mm air restrictors). Race cars never got more exciting than this. Read More
The Porsche 997 GT3 Cup was a series of race cars created by Porsche to enter the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) Group GT3 racing class. Replacing the 996 GT3 Cup, the 997 Cup's 3.6 litre engine is rated at 294 kW (400 PS; 394 hp) and was mated to a six-speed sequential transmission. In 2009, the GT3 Cup received several 997.2 updates including a new 3.8 litre engine with an output of 331 kW (450 PS; 444 hp). Read More
Porsche has announced the introduction of the new 2007 911 GT3 RSR (type 997) for the American Le Mans Series and other world GT racing venues. The latest version of the most successful racing sports car in history is based on the street production model 911 GT3 RS (model year 2007) and was launched in late 2006. The 911 GT3 RSR has wider rear fenders and rear track to improve performance capabilities over its predecessor. The car has also been developed to fit into the 1,225 kg class. The new car is built in accordance with the ACO LMGT2 Regulations and the FIA Article 257. Read More
To a large extent, the 3.6-litre boxer engine is identical to the power unit used in the Porsche Mobil1 Supercup and the international Carrera Cup championships. Power output has increased by 20 horsepower to now 440 hp (324 kW) at 8,000 rpm. Maximum torque is up by ten Nm to 430 at 7,250 revs per minute. The power increase results from optimised engine electronics and a modified exhaust system. In contrast to the GT3 Cup, the body of the Cup S is not based on the road-going GT3 but on the GT3 RS. Read More
Following the Porsche 911 GT3 Cup, Porsche AG, Stuttgart, is entering yet another racing car in the 2010 motorsport season: The 911 GT3 R will be raced in series based on the international FIA GT3 regulations, thus succeeding the 911 GT3 Cup S. The main focus in developing this new model was on even better drivability and even easier handling. The 911 GT3 R is powered by a four-litre six-cylinder boxer engine delivering maximum output of 480 bhp (353 kW) transmitted to the rear axle by a sequential six-speed dog gearbox. Read More
During the Geneva Motor Show, a Porsche 911 GT3 R with innovative hybrid drive is making its debut. The innovative hybrid technology featured in the car has been developed especially for racing, standing out significantly in its configuration and components from conventional hybrid systems. In this case, electrical front axle drive with two electric motors developing 60 kW each supplements the 480-bhp four-litre flat-six at the rear of the 911 GT3 R Hybrid. Instead of batteries, an electrical flywheel power generator delivers energy to the electric motors. Read More
Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 (2011)
The Porsche 997 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 is an update to the 997 GT3 R Hybrid. Compared to its predecessor, which debuted in 2010, the 2011 second-generation hybrid is 20 percent lighter and more efficient without any concession to lap times. While sharing the same paint scheme, the new vehicle is easily identified by its lack of intakes in front of each rear wheel - changes to engine cooling allowed the slats to be dropped and aerodynamic efficiency improved. It gets a traditional race-bred flat six engine. The GT3 R Hybrid has a completely independent second driveline in the front of the chassis, a clever and complex hybrid electric set up that rockets it from standstill to 60 mph in just 2.5 seconds. Read More
As the rules do not permit higher output engines, the engine for the 991 RSR was taken from the 997 GT3 RSR 4.0 and the development work focused on the chassis, body, aerodynamics and the gearbox. A wishbone front suspension replaced the McPherson struts used in 997. A new development was the lightweight gearbox. One of the priorities in the development was the more evenly balanced weight distribution. The centre of gravity was lower, too. Read More
The new Porsche 911 GT3 Cup is powered by a 3.8-litre six-cylinder flat engine. It generates 460 hp (338 kW) at 7,500 revs, surpassing the predecessor by 10 hp. A six-speed dog-type gearbox developed by Porsche Motorsport which is operated via shift paddles at the steering wheel for the first time in a Porsche brand trophy race car transmits the power to the rear axle. The single piece race wheels with centre mount were also new. Read More
The 996 series was a monumental update to the 911 story. The Type 996 introduced water-cooled engines and it also ushered in a new body design. The roof line with a windscreen which is around five degrees flatter gives the side view a more fluid look. Gone was the "classic" 911 design, the entire main body now much sleeker. The flat six in the Carrera 996 was a newly-developed flat-six engine that offered 300 hp. It was mated as standard with a six-speed manual. A 5-speed automatic (Tiptronic) with manual override to shift gears was on the options list. As always, the Carrera 2 was rear-wheel-drive. Read More
The flat six in the Carrera 996 was a newly-developed flat-six engine that offered 300 hp. It was mated as standard with a six-speed manual. A 5-speed automatic (Tiptronic) with manual override to shift gears was on the options list. As always, the Carrera 2 was rear-wheel-drive. Designed as a grand tourer, the Porsche Carrera Cabriolet was the base version for the open-top 911 range in 1998. The retractable roof was able to be stowed away in 20 seconds at speeds of up to 50 kph (31 mph), like the rest of the 911 convertible range. With the roof up, the car was tested in the wind tunnel at speeds of up to 338 kph (210 mph). Read More
Since 1989, the rear-wheel-drive Carrera has always been accompanied by an all-wheel-drive Carrera 4, and the 996 was no different. Overlapping with the last year Carrera 993'S, the 996 Carrera 4 represented two major changes for the venerable 911 lineage: a water-cooled flat-6 engine replaced the air-cooled engine used in the previous 911 model, and the body shell received its first major re-design. Engine was 3.4 L and power was 296 hp featuring a change to an "integrated dry sump" design and variable valve timing. Read More
The 996 Cabriolet was introduced in March 1998 at the Geneva Motor Show. The 996 Cabriolet was long ready (remember, it was tested already in 1995), but for marketing and production-related reasons it was launched in 1998 as a 1999 model. While the evolution with the 911 coupe was questionable from 993 to 996, the real evolution came with the cabriolet. In USA - the biggest market - 911 Cabriolets outsold the Coupés. The all-wheel-drive system provides between 5-40% of torque to the front wheels depending on the situation. Read More
Following the famous 1973 F-model 911 Carrera RS 2.7, Porsche built its successor based on the G-model and it was called the 911 Carrera RS 3.0. With its 172 kW engine, it was the most powerful series production street-legal Porsche made so far. With its new 3.0-liter engine, featuring mechanical fuel injection, it was capable of 230 hp. While 1,580 Carrera RS 2.7s were built for 1973, only 56 Carrera RS 3.0s were built for 1974. Read More
The first road-going 911 Turbo was not the familiar 930 that entered production in February 1975. Nor was it the engine-less prototype that had appeared at the Paris Motor Show in October 1973. Instead, it was a one-off narrow-bodied mule that was subsequently gifted to Ferry Porsche’s sister, Louise, on her 70th birthday in August 1974. Built on chassis 9115600042, this 2.7 Carrera Turbo also pre-dated the prototype 930 that was shown in almost production-ready at Frankfurt show in 1974. Read More
1975 PORSCHE 911S SILVER ANNIVERSARY EDITION
Commemorating 25 years of Porsche sports car production, the 911S Silver Anniversary Edition is distinguished by unique Diamond Silver Metallic paint and a special black leatherette and tweed interior. The first of Porsche’s commemorative ‘celebration’ cars, this Silver Anniversary was produced in a limited run of 1,063 examples, of which approximately 500 are reported to have made their way to the United States. Read More
Commemorating 25 years of Porsche sports car production, the 911S Silver Anniversary Edition is distinguished by unique Diamond Silver Metallic paint and a special black leatherette and tweed interior. The first of Porsche’s commemorative ‘celebration’ cars, this Silver Anniversary was produced in a limited run of 1,063 examples, of which approximately 500 are reported to have made their way to the United States. Read More
1978 Porsche 911 SC Martini Edition
The 'Martini' edition of 1978, was identifiable by a set of side stripes similar to those that appeared on the 1976 British Motor Show 911 Turbo which was clad with the stripes to celebrate victories in the World Manufacturers Championship and the World Sports Car Championship, as well as the fourth consecutive racing season with sponsors Martini & Rossi. The stripes were so popular that Porsche quickly made them an option available to any owner as a factory or retro fit. Read More
In 1980, a true limited edition model 911SC was produced for the American market. The 'Weissach' edition was a standard SC with special paint. It was built in 1980 to honor the Porsche Motorsport team working in Weissach Germany. 468 units were made and half were painted Metallic Black, the other half in Platinum Metallic. The interiors were wrapped in Doric Grey leather with burgundy piping. Additional body and mechanical specs included whale tail spoiler, Bilstein dampers and Fuchs wheels. Read More
Slantnosed and based on that of the 935 racecars, with pop-up headlamps. The front spoiler was made deeper in order to accommodate the extra oil cooler, while intakes in the rear wings fed air to the brakes. The larger turbocharger and four-outlet exhaust gave 30bhp of extra power. Porsche began their “special order program” offering a Flachbau option (Slantnose) for the 930 in very limited production. All of this at a cost of nearly 2 times the standard 930S. Read More
Finally, in 1982 the model 911 SP 'Ferry Porsche' was introduced as a special edition to celebrate 50 years of Porsche. This special edition was finished in Meteor metallic paint with burgundy leather interior and a 'Ferry Porsche' signature on the headrests. Only 200 of these now-classic special cars were built (130 Coupes and 70 Targas). The 911 SC “Jubilee” or “Ferry Porsche” is the first “limited series” sold in Europe. Read More
Porsche introduced a new wide-body package option. Known as the M491 option it was commonly known as the "Turbo-Look". It gave the naturally aspirated cars the look and style of the 930 Turbo with wide wheel arches and the distinctive "tea tray" tail. It wasn't just about looks however, because M491 also got you the stiffer suspension shared with the Turbo and the superior Turbo braking system as well as the wider Turbo wheels. It was available on the Coupe, Cab and Targa. Read More
The 911 Carrera Club Sport was Porsche refocusing on what they do best – high performance, lightweight motoring. This is probably the most underrated Porsche ever made. Manufactured between August 1987 and September 1989 only 340 cars. It had a blueprinted, high revving engine mated to a modified short-shift, close-ratio G50 gearbox. It had track-bias suspension modifications too. Read More
Just 50 ‘C16’ cars were manufactured for the UK-market, initially equipped with an uprated engine of 330bhp (from 300) mated to a 4-speed transmission. However, at the end of 1988, the uprated 5-Speed G50 gearbox was introduced, dramatically easing the peaks in power delivery by reducing the effects of ‘turbo-lag’. The factory SE also benefited from a dual-exit exhaust system, limited-slip differential, heated front seats and a sunroof. Read More
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