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Model year 1994. Carrera 4 Wide-Body for the U.S. Technically there is really no difference between the Carrera 4 Wide-Body and his RoW counterpart. At the front there are the for America usual black impact absorbers beside the fog lights, the frontfenders lack the side indicators, the rear bumper is equipped with the center piece with a small plate section and in the back window of a large third brake light is integrated. Significant differences, it is generally provided in the factory standard equipment. Read More
Porsche 911 Speedster (Turbo-Look) (964)
In contrast to the 911 Speedster from the 1989 model year, the 964 Speedster was only offered and produced with the narrow body shape. In December 1991, the first wide bodied prototype based on a 964 Carrera 2 Convertible Turbo-Look was registered at Porsche AG, but it never made it ready for a series production. In response to recurring customer requests for Turbo-Look Speedsters - the optical characteristics of the wide body in combination with the flat windscreen and fiberglass cover had found many fans - Porsche converted the previously individually ordered, narrow Speedster in the exclusive department. Read More
Porsche 911 ’30 Jahre’ Anniversary (964) (1993)
In March 1993, Porsche presented the Porsche 911 anniversary model “30 years 911” at the Geneva Motor Show. Since then, the special model is also called “Jubi” for short. Under the Porsche internal code M096, there is essentially a Carrera 4 with the wide turbo body but without wings. The 964 anniversary edition could be ordered with exclusive interior design and numerous possibilities of customization. According to Porsche, the special model was limited to 911 vehicles and manufactured in the model years 1993 and 1994. Read More
The 964 Carrera RS 3.8 was produced as a base for homologation for the venerable 3.8 RSR. It was unveiled in 1993 and produced in a very small series by Porsche’s Racing Department in Weissach-Flacht, and was an extreme evolution of the 964 Carrera RS that was released two years prior. It featured the wide-body look of the Type 964 Turbo, a massive rear spoiler, and three-piece “Speedline for Porsche” wheels with 235/40 and 285/35 tires, making it distinctively more aggressive in appearance than the fairly restrained styling of the Carrera RS of 1992 and capable of providing significantly more mechanical grip. Read More
The 964 based Speedster was the 1994 Speedster which was based on the 964 Carrera 2 platform. There are far fewer 1994 911 Speedsters in the world than the 1989 model, with production reportedly totaled only around 936 units, less than half as many as the 1989 example. Whereas the 1989 Speedster was primarily an aesthetic package, the 964 version sought a happy medium between the regular Carrera 2 and the hardcore Carrera RS. It had the same engine as the base Carrera and didn’t have the same suspension bits as the RS. Read More
The original 1973 Carrera RS was available in Europe but not in the USA. Porsche decided to build the 1993 Carrera RS both to European spec and a limited number in compliance with US regulations. These US spec cars were assigned the name “RS America”. The intent was to create a basic lightweight, no frills 911 with minimal luxury options. The standard US Carrera 2 brakes, engine and gearbox were used. The RS weighed 2,945 pounds so it was almost 80 pounds lighter than a standard Carrera 2.  Read More
The Turbo-look Porsche 964 has always been a very desirable automobile, among them 1,532 Carrera 2 Cabriolets constructed worldwide. Within that group, there were some cars that were even more specialized. The Register says six Turbo-look cabriolets were pulled off the production line in Zuffenhausen and transported to the Porsche Exclusive shop in Weissach. Three of these six powerful and luxuriously equipped drop-tops were equipped with left-hand drive for buyers in Germany (Code C00), and the other three were fitted with right-hand drive Read More
Porsche 911 Turbo S2 (964) (1992)
A forgotten part of the 964s history is the Turbo S2. It was built to adhere to homologation rules so Porsche could participate in IMSA's sports car racing series. IMSA's homologation rules meant that Porsche had to build at least 200 road-going versions of the participating car, 20 of which needed to share most of the primary components of the race car. The 911 Turbo S2 was built specifically for this purpose and exclusively for the United States and Canada. The 20 homologation specials left the factory as stock 964 Turbos, heading immediately to California-based tuner for "S2" engine upgrades. Read More
Porsche 911 America Roadster (964) (1992 - 1993)
The American Roadster is essentially a turbo-bodied Carrera Cabriolet with Turbo suspension and brakes. Like the 356 America Roadster it was named after, the Type 964 America Roadster was a limited-edition, driver-focused convertible destined for the American market. Production for the America Roadster was limited at only 250 examples, and the model was only produced in 1992 and 1993. Its engine was a standard unit making 250 horsepower, but the special edition had the wide fender flares, suspension, brakes, and 17-inch Porsche Cup wheels of the 911 Turbo. Read More
The 964 Carrera RS (Standard) was introduced by Porsche for model year 1992 specifically for the European market as a lightweight, high performance version of the 964 Carrera 2. It featured a revised version of the standard 3.6 liter engine, titled M64/03 internally, with an increased power output of 260 bhp (194 kW; 264 PS). The RS does not look much different from the other 911 models of the period but its weight is reduced and power increased. True to its racing spirit, the Carrera RS featured bucket seats and thinner materials, but lacked power windows, air conditioning, air bags, and other creature comforts. Read More
Porsche 911 Type 964 Carrera 2 'Works Turbo Look' Cabriolet was a special model in the 964 lineup. It gave buyers of the Carrera 2 Cab the great wide look of the Turbo cars and the Carrera 2 engine. The model was available as a 1992 and 1993 model year car (while some argue it was also available for a while in 1994). You get body shape of the 964 Turbo 3.3 without the huge rear spoiler. But this was more than just a design exercise, because the the Turbo-Look models also got the chassis and braking system from the Turbo 3.3 too.  Read More
The rarest 964 RS variant was the awesome 964 C4 Lightweight. Known as the 964 Leichtbau it made use of surplus parts from 953 Paris-Dakar project. A handful of specially prepared lightweight 911s were fabricated by the Porsche factory and called the Carrera 4 RS Lightweight. Carrera RS Body with 959-like AWD wizardry and more power. Lightweight masterpiece. Used parts from 953 Paris-Dakar project. The 964 C4 Lightweight was powered by the same 3.6 liter flat six as the normal 964 RS, but was fettled to produce 300 hp. Read More
With the 1993 Carrera 2 as the starting point, Porsche had to make at least 50 roadgoing cars in order to qualify this new model for the Carrera ADAC GT Cup, which served as the basis for a motor racing variant to come, the Carrera RSR 3.8. The RSR 3.8 was nothing short of an all-out race car that could be delivered to the track in a ‘just add driver’ form. The Porsche Carrera RSR 3.8 racked up a catalogue of impressive international race results right from the outset, winning overall at the Spa 24 Hours, Suzuka 1000km, and the 24 Hours of Interlagos. Read More
For race teams and track day customers Porsche prepared a small number of the 964 Cup cars according to the FIA NG-T regulations. Officially called the Competition model, these custom-ordered cars were an intermediary step between the Carrera Cup option (M001) and the standard tourer (M002). This M0003 option was available directly from Porsche as a road-going model. These cars had almost all the Carrera Cup modifications including the new suspension. This lowered the car by 40mm in the rear and 50mm in the front. It also included fitting of the larger 930 Turbo disc brakes and adjustable anti-roll bars. Read More
Introduced in 1989 (the year of the 911’s 25th anniversary), the 964 Carrera 4 was a significant new model for the company, but the 4-wheel drive system was deemed unsuitable for the company’s racing series. Manufactured alongside the Carrera 4 at the same time was the more traditional rear-wheel drive Carrera 2, but this model’s launch was only planned for a year later, in the hope that it would not detract from potential sales of the Carrera 4. The 1990 season was the first season that saw the 911-based model become the pillar on which the Porsche Carrera Cup series has been established. Read More
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