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Jägermeister 934 – the Professional Hunter

Jägermeister Porsche 934 chassis #930 670 0167
Jägermeister Porsche 934 chassis #930 670 0167

The Jägermeister 934 is one of the most recognisable liveries in the world of motor racing. It adorned the bodies of some of the great race cars in the 1970s and 1980s, and irrespective of whether the car won a race or not, it was usually the crowd’s favourite.
The 1970s was a period of great experimentation and innovation, both in the road car sector and in the racing world. Turbocharging became very popular and manufacturers around the world slapped a turbocharger on just about anything and everything, in order to claim a slice of the action and market growth. Porsche actually kicked off this whole revolution when in 1972 they turbocharged the 917/10 Can-Am Spyder that went on to dominate the Canadian-American series for two seasons. In 1974, the Carrera RSR Turbo, a 2142 cc powered 911 (actually the first 911 turbocharged racer), was driven by Gijs van Lennep and Herbert Müller in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, where they finished in a remarkable second place overall. The 930 production model was launched in 1975, while the Porsche 934 Turbo race car came along a year later.

Jägermeister Porsche 934 chassis #930 670 0167
Jägermeister Porsche 934 chassis #930 670 0167 in Carmel, California at the Concours on the Avenues

Looking very much like the production Porsche 930 Turbo on which it was based, the 934 Turbo was just that – a 930 Turbo intended for action in the Group 4 class of sports car racing. In fact, externally, the 934 Turbo differed visually from the production model only in that it was fitted with a more aggressive looking front air dam, which had an aerodynamic benefit but it also carried the two cooling radiators for the intercoolers. To be eligible for Group 4, Porsche had to make at least 25 units of the 934, in fact they produced 32 cars in 1976. The 934 was an interesting and important model in Porsche’s racing family, in that all future 911 turbocharged racing models flowed from this car.

Jägermeister Porsche 934 chassis #930 670 0167
Jägermeister Porsche 934 chassis #930 670 0167 in Carmel, California at the Concours on the Avenues

The 934 Turbo was not a works racer, that honour went to the 935 which, in 1976, was only available to the factory squad. In an effort not to drown out the attempts of its burgeoning customer racing base, Porsche elected to stay out of Group 4 racing and to leave this class for its customers to compete in. The 935 was aimed at the bigger-engined Group 5 class where customers did not race due to the demands of much higher budgets. The race classes and model derivatives fitted well together as the racing version of the Porsche Turbo was based on the 930, and the ‘4’ in 934 indicated that it raced in Group 4, while the ‘5’ in 935 indicated that it raced in Group 5. By simply replacing the ‘0’ in the 930 model designation with ‘4’ or ‘5’ you have the 934 and 935 race cars.

Jägermeister Porsche 934 chassis #930 670 0167
Jägermeister Porsche 934 chassis #930 670 0167 in Carmel, California at the Concours on the Avenues

The 934 Turbo had to relate much more closely to its production sibling than the full factory 935 racer. That said, while the 934 still looked very much like its roadgoing relative externally, there were several changes and upgrades under the skin. The teams could fit extended wheel arches, in order to fit wider rubber which was necessary to cope with the much higher acceleration, braking and lateral forces generated by a race car.
In the engine bay, the vertical fan was changed to a more efficient horizontal one. Fitting the turbo and the associated equipment was not without its problems, while the turbo and wastegate were mounted between the engine and the rear valance. The turbocharger fitted, a KK&K model K33, was in fact the same unit as fitted to the Porsche 917/10. There was though, insufficient space in the engine bay for an air-to-air intercooler, and so a water-based cooling system was installed with the radiators located within the deep air dam up front. A water pump was installed to circulate the coolant through the system. By locating the radiators up front, and by also moving the oil tank to the front luggage compartment, this had the effect of improving the car’s weight distribution.

Jägermeister Porsche 934 chassis #930 670 0167
Jägermeister Porsche 934 chassis #930 670 0167 in Carmel, California at the Concours on the Avenues

Additional weight saving measures included the removal of the rear seats plus the front passenger seat and all unnecessary switches and gadgets. However, the teams could not fit Plexiglass as the 934 had to retain the standard production glass. Mandatory safety equipment included a roll cage and a six-point harness. Suspension modifications were limited but the teams could fit an adjustable suspension set-up to allow for more precise settings for different tracks. Stiffer springs, shock absorbers, certain reinforcing parts and 917 racing brakes were also fitted. The standard hubs were replaced by special, reinforced hubs with centre-lock wheel fittings. Three-piece BBS alloy wheels were used. However, the cars were delivered from the factory with their electric windows installed and still operational!

Jägermeister Porsche 934 chassis #930 670 0167
Jägermeister Porsche 934 chassis #930 670 0167 in Carmel, California at the Concours on the Avenues

Porsche’s racing customers were understandably keen to get their hands on the new 934, because the 911 model was familiar to them and they were able to attract lucrative sponsorships deals to help fund their racing activities. From the mid-70s onwards, race cars displayed ever-increasing creativity with radical liveries and colour schemes. Successful privateer teams included the Kremer Brothers, GELO Racing, Max Moritz and others, and they all brought their own branding and sponsorship to the track, ensuring a colourful, and enjoyable spectacle.

Porsche 934 Turbo – chassis #930 670 0167

Chassis #930 670 0167 was sold to the German car dealer, Max Moritz of Reutlingen, Germany, to be campaigned in the European GT racing scene. Why chassis #0167 became so well-known, was because of the sponsorship deal that Moritz struck with Jägermeister, the manufacturers of the famous herbal liqueur, located in Wolfenbüttel, Lower Saxony, about 200 km south of Hamburg.

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