Porsche 911 997.1 (2004-2009)

Photos unveiled by Porsche AG: May 7, 2004
Premiere: July 16, 2004 at 9:11 pm in 85 Porsche centres in Germany
Market launch: July 17, 2004

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MY2005 MY2006 MY2007 MY2008 MY2009  
Carrera Coupé 3.6 239 kW
Carrera Cabriolet 3.6 239 kW
Carrera S Coupé 3.8 261 kW
Carrera S Coupé X51 WLS 3.8 280 kW
Carrera S Cabriolet 3.8 261 kW
Carrera S Cabriolet X51 WLS 3.8 280 kW
Carrera 4 Coupé 3.6 239 kW
Carrera 4 Cabriolet 3.6 239 kW
Carrera 4S Coupé 3.8 261 kW
Carrera 4S Coupé X51 WLS 3.8 280 kW
Carrera 4S Cabriolet 3.8 261 kW
Carrera 4S Cabriolet X51 WLS 3.8 280 kW
Targa 4 3.6 239 kW
Targa 4S 3.8 261 kW
Targa 4S X51 WLS 3.8 280 kW
Turbo Coupé 3.6 353 kW
Turbo Cabriolet 3.6 353 kW
GT3 3.6 305 kW
GT3 ClubSport 3.6 305 kW
GT3 RS 3.6 305 kW
GT2 3.6 390 kW
GT2 ClubSport 3.6 390 kW
2005 season 2006 season 2007 season 2008 season 2009 season 2010 season
GT3 Cup 3.6 294 kW GT3 Cup 3.6 309 kW
GT3 Cup S 3.6 324 kW
GT3 RSR 3.8 357 kW GT3 RSR 3.8 342 kW GT3 RSR 4.0 331 kW

On May 7, 2004, Porsche announced that the new 911 generation will come in July with two engine variants - the Carrera 3.6 and the Carrera S 3.8. The chassis included the active suspension as standard for the S model. For the 911 Carrera, the Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM), could be ordered on request. Pressing the "sport" button makes the shock absorbers firmer. The standard wheel size for the 997 Carrera is 18" and for the "S" 19". To improve active safety, the standard Porsche Stability Management system (PSM) had two new functions. Pre-filling the brake mechanism ensured more spontaneous deceleration when required, and the hydraulic brake power support helped to build up full brake pressure in emergencies. The Porsche Communication Management (PCM) screen came as standard, but the navigation module was an optional extra. The basic sound system included 9 speakers.

Although with the 'right' shape of the headlamps again, the 997 generation introduced in 2004 was more of a cosmetic makeover. The structural bodyshell, the shape of the roof and the 3.6-litre engine of the 996 Carrera (type M96) were kept. The 997 Carrera 3.6 engine had 3 kW more thanks to chip tuning. The financial trick was to offer the new M97 3.8-litre engine in the model called the 911 Carrera S. So, if you really wanted a NEW 911, you ordered the car with the 3.8-litre engine. As the years went by, the downside of the bored-out engine came out - the larger the displacement of the M96/M97-engine, the fragile its 6th cylinder is.

997 body construction: welding machine is used to attach the fastening points for the wiring © Porsche
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Tequipment car cover © Porsche
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911 1963, 911 1973, 959 1987, 911 964 1988, 911 993 1993, 911 996.1 1997, 911 996.2 2001 and 911 997 introduced in 2004 (as 2005 model)© Porsche
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In the climatic chambers tests can be carried out at temperatures as low as minus 40 degrees © Porsche
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Testing the acoustics in the Weissach research and development centre© Porsche
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Beautiful photo of a Guards Red (Indischrot) 997© Porsche
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Beautiful hips... (note the bumperettes on the USA model) © Porsche
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Wheels and tyres: Carrera 3.6 - 8x18 with 235/40 and 10x18 with 265/40, Carrera S - 8x19 with 235/35 and 11x19 with 295/30 © Porsche
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Porsche Tequipment snow chains are the ultimate proof Porsches are made for year round daily use © Porsche
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Although cool to see a Porsche in the winter, it is thought cold starts in freezing temperatures is one of the reasons the cylinder walls and pistons wear out in the 997.1 Carreras (especially the 3.8 litre S/4S)© Porsche
Duplicated central braking light © James Herne / Stuttcars.com
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997.1 Carrera wheels: 18" Carrera, 19" Carrera S, 19" Carrera Classic, 19" SportDesign© Porsche
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Nice classic interior design © Porsche
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Carrera: triangular steering wheel airbag, black instrument dials. Carrera S: rounded airbag module, silver instrument dials, © Porsche
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Carrera S with multifunction steering wheel (available only in the standard Carrera steering wheel design). Optional useless stop watch on the dashboard (comes with the Sport Chrono package). © Porsche
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Carrera S 3.8 © Porsche
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Carrera 3.6 with optional tyre pressure monitoring© Porsche
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Useless Sports Display, the feature that comes with the Sport Chrono package. Despite the car having the GPS antenna, it is not used to measure your lap times and you have to start and stop the time manually. Better to use the RaceLogic VBOX.© Porsche
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Sports Display © Porsche
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Left photo: standard gear lever travel. Right photo: short shift kit installed. Although the short shift kit sounds like a great idea, it wasn't put into practise so well - it is really hard and therefore quite unpleasant to move the lever with the kit installed (would come as standard in GT3, GT2).© Porsche
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Optional fully electric seat compared to the adaptive sports seat © Porsche
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The front buttons of the adaptive sports seat move the bolsters, so the seat can be adjusted for smaller or larger person, or for more sporty or more comfortable setup. © Porsche
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ISOFIX © Porsche
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Passenger airbag on/off © Porsche
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© Porsche + Stuttcars.com (basic graphics from Porsche, modified by James Herne / Stuttcars.com to jibe)
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Safety bar in the door© Porsche
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Left photo: front axle view from the front, right photo: rear axle view from the rear© Porsche + Stuttcars.com (base graphics from Porsche, joined by James Herne / Stuttcars.com)
PASM - Porsche Active Suspension Management© Porsche
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The PCCB Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes give a weight reduction of 14 kg/30 lb on a Carrera S, but are not a problem-free choice© Porsche
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The induction noise of the 3.8-litre engine became too loud for the regulations, so an active Helmholtz resonator was installed in the air cleaner box © Porsche
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This picture shows the crankshaft shape of the 911 - every piston rod has its own crankshaft neck, so the pistons move away and towards the crankshaft at the same time - which looks like they box, hence the name 'boxer engine'© Porsche
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Oil circuit of the 997.1 Carrera S 3.8-litre engine © Porsche
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Combustion chamber of the 997.1 3.8-litre engine © Porsche
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The exhaust gases from the left cylinder bank exit through the right exhaust pipe and vice versa © Porsche
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997.1 Carrera 3.6 and Carrera S 3.8 © Porsche
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997.1 Carrera S 3.8 © Porsche
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997.1 Carrera 3.6 and Carrera S 3.8 - the main visual difference is in the intake manifold © Porsche
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© Porsche + Stuttcars.com (base graphics from Porsche, joined by James Herne / Stuttcars.com)

997 GT3 Cup, 2005-2007 model

The 997 GT3 Cup was introduced in January for the upcoming 2005 season. The 3.6-litre durable old-school unit had 294 kW/400 Nm and maximum 8200 rpm. The gearbox was a 6-speed sequential dog-type gearbox with 5.5" triple-disc sintered-metal clutch. The fuel tank had 90-litres. There were front and rear double coil springs and the power steering had electro-hydraulic pressure feed. 3-piece central locking aluminium rims were used, fronts 9x18, rears 11x18. The tyres were naturally from the best manufacturer, Michelin, fronts 24/64-18 and rears 27/68-18. The body had many carbon fibre parts: front bumper and spoiler edge, doors and rear bumper. Air jack system was incorporated into the car. For the 2005 season, the car was only used for the international Supercup series. The Supercup specification saw the car with PCCB Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes (380/350 mm) and car weight approx. 1120 kg/2469 lb (incl. oil, coolant). For the 2006 season the Carrera Cup specification was declared: steel rotors in the same size as PCCB in Supercup and car weight 1140 kg/2513 lb.

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997 GT3 Cup photo revealed in January 2005© Porsche
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The Office © Porsche
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2005 March 28, Porsche Parade in Bahrain - the first public showing of the 997 GT3 Cup© Porsche

Three days after the 997 GT3 Cup was shown at the Porsche Parafe in Bahrain, the Aerokit was introduced for the coupé-bodied 911 Carrera and Carrera S. The Aerokit consisted of a GT3 Cup-style front spoiler and a different rear spoiler (a year later to be used on the GT3 street version).

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997 Carrera S with Aerokit - the excellent drag coefficient of the 997 Carrera remained unchanged with the enlarged front spoiler and rear wing© Porsche
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997 Carrera S with Aerokit. The black wheels with body coloured rims are from Porsche Exclusive department.© Porsche

Carrera 4/4S

For the spring of 2005 the Carrera 4 and 4S were introduced. The all-wheel drive system had a Visco multi-plate clutch, which brought 5-40% percent of the driving power to the front wheels. To sell more of these more expensive versions, marketing guys decided to offerl the wider body together with the front wheel drive (and not with S engine!?). The Carrera 4/4S body is 1.7"/44 mm wider. With the rear mounted engine the rear wheels have enormous traction, which is good for motorsport, but not so fun to drive by some. On one hand the front wheel drive system kills the sharpness in the 911 and on the other hand the system is not offering permanent 4WD, so it really doesn't give you any benefits. It gives weight. What is Porsche driving experience without agility? With "4" in the 911 model name, the first owner paid an extra 9% to kill the fun in the car.

Cabriolet

The 997 Cabriolet was announced on December 6, 2004, and introduced at all the 85 German Porsche centres on April 2, 2005. The 997 Cabriolet weighs 85 kg/187 lb more than the Coupé. Both versions have the same top speed. The side airbags provide a unique form of protection for the head, even when the top is down. The Carrera Cabriolet costed 13% more than the Coupe or exactly as much as the Carrera S Coupé.

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Materials used for the bodyshell - as can be seen, the coupé and cabriolet have the same 'safety bar', the strong windscreen frame© Porsche + Stuttcars.com (base graphics from Porsche, joined by James Herne / Stuttcars.com)
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While with the 996, the hardtop was standard equipment, it was made optional for the 997 - a smart move as most of the 996 Cabrio owners had problems finding storage space for the quite useless hardtop © Porsche
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Like was the case already with the 3.6-litre 996 cabriolet, the top can be moved while the car is rolling (maximum allowed speed 30 mph/50 kph) © Porsche
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The artistic movement can be enjoyed for 20 seconds one way © Porsche
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The wind deflector is standard equipment for the 997 Cabriolet © Porsche
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Pyrotechnically erecting roll-over bars © Porsche
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1:1 cut model (belongs to Stuttgart Porsche Museum, but here on a loan at the Gmünd Porsche Museum)© James Herne

On July 3, 2005, Porsche announced that the market launch of the Carrera 4 and Carrera 4S Cabriolets was scheduled for the October 22, 2005. This was not an interesting news for the Porsche enthusiasts - who would want to have a heavy Porsche? Also, there aren't many people who would prefer to drive a 911 Cabrio in the winter, because the windows tend to freeze to the roof seal, so opening and closing the doors in the winter might not be very pleasing.

From the 2006 season the 997 GT3 Cup cars were also used for national Carrera Cup series in addition to the Supercup and Porsche built the record number of 195 units of the then new 911 GT3 Cup.

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Weissach, 2006 911 997 GT3 Cup 3.6© Porsche
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2006 March 23-28, Adelaide Parklands Circuit, Carrera Cup Australia, Ian Dyk of Juniper Racing taking off..Extracted from the 2012 film "Porsche Carrera Cup GB - 10 Years in the Making

997 Turbo 3.6

The 997 GT3 and the 997 Turbo were presented on February 28, 2006 at the Geneva Motor Show. The Turbo was available in European dealerships from June 24, 2006. Compared to the 996 Turbo, the power was up from 309 kW to 353 kW, but so was the weight by 45 kg/99 lb (996 Turbo 1540 kg/3395 lb, 997 Turbo 3.6 1585 kg/3494 lb). The 997 Turbo was 22 mm wider than the 996 Turbo. Thanks to the new Variable Turbine Geometry (VTG) turbochargers, the turbo lag was minized and the maximum torque of 620 Nm was available between 1950-5000 rpm (compare to 996 Turbo: 560 Nm between 2700-4600 rpm). The principle of variable turbine geometry unites the advantages of small and large turbochargers and leads to improvement in flexibility and acceleration, particularly at low speeds. The vehicle’s flexibility can be enhanced even further with the optional “Sport Chrono Package Turbo”. Here the driver selects the sport-mode to activate a short-time overboost at full throttle. This increases boost pressure in the mid speed range by 0.2 bar for up to 10 seconds; torque rises by 60 to 680 Nm. The time required by the 997 Turbo with manual transmission for intermediate acceleration from 80 to 120 km/h is reduced by 0.3 seconds to 3.5 seconds. In comparison with the 996 Turbo, the diameter of the brake discs at the front and rear wheels has been increased by 20 mm to 350 mm. Optional PCCB Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes give a weight reduction of 17 kg/37 lb compared to the standard brakes. The PCCB discs for 997 Turbo have a diameter of 380 mm at the front axle and 350 mm at the rear. The wheel sizes are 8.5x19 with 235/35 tyres and 11x19 with 305/30 tyres.

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Walter Röhrl © Porsche
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The side air inlets direct cooling air into the intercoolers which are placed behind the rear wheels© Porsche
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997 Turbo 3.6 © Porsche
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VTG turbo © Porsche
This is how the Variable Turbine Geometry (VTG) is achieved© James Herne / Stuttcars.com

997 GT3 3.6 street version

The 997 GT3 3.6 was presented at the 2006 Geneva Motor Show together with the 997 Turbp 3.6. It was announced that the GT3 goes on sale across Europe in May 2006 and in the USA from August. At 8400 rpm, the engine speed limit was raised by 200 rpm compared to the previous 996.2 GT3. In addition to the standard aluminium front lid, the doors are also of aluminium in the 997 GT3. New for the GT3 was a change-up display, which lights up on the rev counter shortly before the relevant engine speed is reached. The GT3 accelerates from 0 to 100 kph in 4.3 seconds, and reaches 100 mph/160 kph from a standing start in 8.7 seconds. Its top speed is 193 mph/310 kph, equal to the much more powerful 997 Turbo.

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Standard brake discs are proper steel units you can rely on© Sportauto.ee
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The rear bumper is a design masterpiece © Porsche
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The faster you go the higher the air pressure gets in the intake © Sportauto.ee
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Optional bucket seats © Porsche
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Alcantara door panel © Sportauto.ee
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Standard seats are for you if you plan to use the GT3 as a daily driver (you have to be prepared for the racing suspension, though)© Sportauto.ee
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Optimistic speedometer shows 350 km/h, while the official top speed is 310 km/h. The rev limtter is set at 8400 rpm. © Sportauto.ee

The GT3 was naturally available with the no-cost ClubSport option which included the roll cage and a few other racing items. The bucket seats had to be paid for, though. The GT3 CS was further developed into the GT3 RS.

997 GT3 RS 3.6

The 997 GT3 RS was basically an optical tuning version of the GT3. As announced on May 29, 2006, the GT3 RS would be available from October 2006 in Europe and from March 2007 in North America. With the 44 mm wider body and with the roll cage installed, the RS cannot be lighter than the basic GT3 (Porsche claims the RS is 20 kg/44 lb lighter). The omission of the underbody rust protection and the plastic rear window don't give much weight-saving. The roll cage gives a lot of extra weight. The standard GT3 has regular sports seats in basic configuration, so with the optional bucket seats (standard in RS), the GT3 cannot be heavier than the GT3 RS. The lap times on the Nürburgring Nordschleife proove that the standard car is equally quick if not quicker. The RS has a single-mass flywheel. Thanks to the closer ratio gearbox, the RS is 0.1 seconds faster in the sprint from 0 to 100 kph (4.2 seconds vs 4.3). It takes 13.3 seconds to hit 200 kph. Four color schemes were made for the RS: silver or black with orange contrast and orange and green with black contrast.

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The 997 GT3 RS 3.6 in green is one of the most beautiful Porsches © James Herne / Stuttcars.com
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The RS has plastic rear window © Porsche
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The steering wheel of the RS has a marker © Porsche
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Flame-resistant cloth bucket seats are the only option for the RS. The standard GT3 is additionally available with the leather/alcantara bucket seats if ordered without ClubSport package. © Porsche
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Power and torque graphs show the GT3 3.6 is the weakest 997.1 between 3000-4500 rpm© James Herne / Stuttcars.com

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GT3 Cup cars at the Porsche Michelin Supercup event in USA (Indianapolis Motor Speedway, July 2, 2006) © Porsche

997.1 Targa

On July 17, 2006 it was announced that from November 2006 the 997 Targa is available as a 2007 model. Unfortunately, it became available only in the heavy and useless Targa 4 and 4S versions. The Targa roof can be opened in 7 seconds. The roof unit is of two-ply specially tinted glass, which is 1.9 kg/4 lb lighter than its predecessor in the 996 Targa. Wind noises are kept to a low level even at high speed by a newly developed sealing system. The semi translucent black cloth roller sunblind provides protection from excessive solar radiation.

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997.1 Targa: a side-mounted polished, anodized aluminum trim strip running the length of the roof frame emphasizes the elegant side outline. © Porsche
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The tailgate can either be unlocked by a switch on the driver side doorsill or by the remote control button on the key fob. © Porsche
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The gas strut-operated, upward-tilting rear windshield makes it easy to load the trunk (230 L capacity with rear seats in the folded position). Closing is facilitated by an electric closing aid. © Porsche

GT3 RSR 3.8, 2006-2007 model

Although its first race was the 2006 Spa 24 hours on July 29-30, the RSR was scheduled to race the 2007 season. The ACO and FIA regulations allowed a minimum weight of 1225 kg/2700 lb. The engine was a 3.8-litre unit with two 30.3 mm air restrictors. The power figures were 359 kW and 435 Nm. The rev limitter allowed the engine to reach 9000 rpm. The use of side radiators, taken from the Carrera GT, contributed to the thermal health of the engine. Sequential 6-speed gearbox was taken from the 996 GT3 RSR. The front wheels were 11" wide with 27/65-18 Michelin slicks and the rears 13" with 31/71-18. Brake discs were 380/355 mm. The roll cage was made of 30 metres of seamless steel tubing. Air-jack system was incorporated into the floor. The front and rear lids, the front mudguards, the wider rear, the doors as well as the front and rear panelling and wing consisted of carbon-fibre composite material. For 2007 season approx. 35 units were built

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Very cool car, isn't it! © Porsche
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4x 911 GT3: white 997 GT3 Cup 3.6, silver 997 GT3 3.6, orange 997 GT3 RS 3.6, white 997 GT3 RSR 3.8 © Porsche

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2007: 15th season of Porsche Supercup (GT3 Cup cars)© Porsche
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2007 May 6, Oschersleben, Porsche Carrera Cup Deutschland race: 2007 Supercup winner and Carrera Cup Germany 2007 runner-up Richard Westbrook is kicked from the back by 2007 PCC Germany winner Uwe Alzen © Porsche
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2007 May 20, EuroSpeedway Lausitz (Lausitzring), Porsche Carrera Cup Deutschland race: Richard Westbrook escapes the busy turn© Porsche
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2007 June 24, Norisring, Porsche Carrera Cup Deutschland race - This is racing!© Porsche
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2007 July 1, Circuit de Nevers Magny-Cours, Porsche Supercup, the 2006 season winner Richard Westbrook is on his way to the 2007 season victory© Porsche

997 Turbo 3.6 Cabriolet

Announced on May 7, 2007, the 997 Turbo Cabriolet went on sale on September 8, 2007 as a 2008 model. The already heavy 997 Turbo was made 70 kg/154 lb heavier with the Cabriolet version. Despite its weight the car accelerates mind-blowingly.

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The rear spoiler extends automatically at speeds from 75 mph/120 kph and extends 30 mm further than in the Coupé© Porsche

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2007 May 11, Istanbul, GT3 Cup cars racing in the Porsche Supercup© Porsche
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2007 Nürburgring 24 hour race was won by Manthey Racing modified 997 GT3 RSR. Is flying legal in car racing? © Porsche

At the 2007 Le Mans 24H race, 997 GT3 RSR takes the victory in the GT2 category.

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2007 Le Mans 24H GT2-class winning 997 GT3 RSR 3.8 of Raymond Narac/Richard Liet/Patrick Long (team IMSA Performance Matmut) © Porsche

997 GT2

The 997 GT2 was announced on August 1, 2007. The 3.6-litre twin-turbo engine produced 390 kW and its 200+ mph top speed said it all. The 911 GT2 is what the 911 Turbo initially was (and should be to day ) - a rear wheel drive 911 with turbocharged engine. Benefiting from an innovative expansion-type intake system and VTG turbochargers operating at a maximum pressure of 1.4 bar, the 997 GT2 offers an extra 37 kW over the already powerful 997 Turbo 3.6 running on 0.8 bar turbo boost, or 1.0 bar in temporary overboost mode. The GT2 uses turbochargers featuring an even larger compressor wheel compared to the 997 Turbo 3.6. The principle applied in expansion-type intake system is to use the oscillating intake air during the cooler expansion phase to prepare the fuel/air mixture, keeping the temperature of the fuel/air mixture lower than in the engine of the 997 Turbo 3.6. Like the GT-cars or the Turbo, GT2 comes with dry sump lubrication featuring a separate oil tank. A total of 9 oil pumps ensure smooth and reliable circulation of lubricant even under the long-lasting horizontal forces typically encountered on the race track. To be specific, these 9 oil pumps are 2 oil extraction pumps for the turbochargers, 2 oil extraction pumps each for the cylinder heads, and 2 extraction as well 1 pressure pump in the crankcase. A total of 11 litres of 0W40 oil circulates within the system. With its 1440 kg/3175 lb weight it is 105 kg/231 lb lighter than the Turbo.

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The new Launch Assistant enabled the driver to accelerate with optimum power and performance from a standstill. All the driver had to do is to select the first gear and hold the clutch and gas pedals on the floor. The Motronic engine control unit then immediately opened the throttle butterflies in full and kept the turbochargers at a pressure of 0.9 bar. At the same time the ignition control system set engine speed to 5000 rpm, so that now all the driver had to do was to take his foot off the clutch as quickly as possible. In this process PSM Porsche Stability Management prevented the car from “twitching", with the full power of the engine transmitted to the road.

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The 380/350 mm ceramic discs came as standard without the option for steel rotos. They look super cool and are extra light, but if you plan to use your GT2 for what it was made for - for track days - the PCCB will make your head ache sooner or later. Aftermarket steel rotors are available. © Porsche

The PSM in GT2 had two stages - you could switch the stability control off and leave the traction control on, or ultimately switch off even the traction control to have some fun. The 997 GT2 was the first Porsche homologated for road use to be fitted as standard with an exhaust system featuring a titanium rear-end silencer and titanium tailpipes. With its only 9 kg/20 lb weight it is approximately half the weight of the similar steel unti.

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Compared to the Turbo, 5 mm wheel spacers come as standard. The rear tyres measure 325 mm. The Michelin Pilot Sport Cup tyres offer enormous grip on dry tarmac, but because of their low thread wear, are dangerous on wet surface.© Porsche
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The official Nürburgring Nordschleife lap time for the 997 GT2 is 7:32 (driven by Walter Röhrl). © Porsche
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These openings feed air to the engine© Porsche

Like the GT3, the GT2 also comes with an upshift gear indicator integrated in the rev counter. In consideration of the driver's response time, the indicator comes on somewhat earlier in the lower gears than in the higher transmission ratios. The GT2 naturally was available with the ClubSport package at no extra cost. This special feature comprised a rear rollover cage, red 6-point seat belt on the driver's side, a fire extinguisher as well as a preparation kit for the main battery switch. On cars featuring the ClubSport package the sports bucket seats came with a special flameresistant cover replacing the usual combination of leather and alcantara. According to Porsche, 1155 997.1 GT2 were made including pre-series cars (and excluding 997.2 GT2 RS).

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The GT2 was not available with the 1-piece full carbon fibre bucket seats of the GT3 and was offered with heavier folding backrest bucket seats only (or with regular sports seats when desired). The bucket seats in the GT2 had carbon fibre finish, but they were not full carbon fibre seats.© Porsche

Aerokit for 997 Turbo 3.6 Coupé

A very mild aerokit was introduced for the Turbo on December 5, 2007. It included a front spoiler lip and a new engine cover with fixed aerofoil. Compared to the standard 911 Turbo, the side skirts and the rear skirt were painted in body color.

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997 Turbo 3.6 with Aerokit © Porsche
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997 GT3 RSR 3.8, 2008 model

With the new regulations, the power of the 2008 GT3 RSR had to be decreased by 15 kW, to 342 kW. The torque figure didn't loose that much - 430 instead of 435 Nm. The gearbox was totally new. Much of its know-how came from the RS Spyder sports prototype. The car's weight according to FIA regulations was 1200 kg/2645 lb and according to ACO (Le Mans) 1225 kg/2700 lb.

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The only visual difference to the 2006 RSR were the front spoiler side flicks © Porsche
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2008 Nürburgring 24 hour race winner Manthey GT3 RSR © Porsche

Like in 2007 and 2008, the 2009 Nürburgring 24 hour race was won by Manthey Racing's yellow-green 997 GT3 RSR driven by Timo Bernhard, Marc Lieb, Romain Dumas and Marcel Tiemann - 3 years in a row with the same team and the same drivers! In addition the 2006 N24 race was won by Manthey, then with a 996 in the same color scheme.

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2009 Nürburgring 24H: this is how you go to win the race© Porsche
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2009 Nürburgring 24H: Bon appetit, Manthey! This GT3 RSR did not just eat all the rivals, it went for the salad, too :-)© Porsche
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2009 Nürburgring 24 hour finish: the winning GT3 RSR and third place GT3 Cup S (Emmanuel Collard, Wolf Henzler, Richard Lietz, Dirk Werner) are both of Manthey racing team© Porsche
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Olaf Manthey's racing team won the Nürburgring 24 hour race 4 times in a row, in 2006 with a 996 and in 2007-2008-2009 with a 997 GT3 RSR - probably an unbeatable record for any other team© Porsche

997 GT3 Cup S

In February 2008 Porsche Motorsport announced a new model, called the 911 GT3 Cup S and made for the championships which run in accordance with FIA GT3 regulations. To a large extent, the 3.6-litre boxer engine is identical to the power unit in the GT3 Cup. Power output was raised to 324 kW and maximum torque to 430 Nm. The power increase results from optimised engine electronics and a modified exhaust system. The clutch disc is a 5.5" three-plate carbon-fibre unit. In contrast to the GT3 Cup, the body of the Cup S is not based on the road-going GT3 but on the road-going GT3 RS. In the wider wheel arches larger wheels can be mounted. At the front, the rims measure 10.5" in width with 12" wheels fitted at the rear. The front section and flares are significantly different to the GT3 Cup components. An adjustable front-splitter generates more downforce at the front axle. The rear-wing is wider and positioned higher than the Cup version and provides more downforce at the rear axle. Several suspension components for the GT3 Cup S have been taken from the more powerful GT3 RSR which races in the GT2 class at international long-distance championships. At the rear the diameter of the brake discs has grown by 5 mm to 355mm (front discs still 380 mm). In addition to complete cars, Porsche Motorsport offered a kit to upgrade the 2007 GT3 Cup models to the GT3 Cup S specs. The weight of the GT3 Cup S is approx 1170 kg/2580 lb.

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997 GT3 Cup S with its unique 1-piece front spoiler© Porsche
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Extra high rear wing© Porsche
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Unique front fenders© Porsche
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© Porsche
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© Porsche

GT3 Cup 3.6, 2008-2009 model

For the 2008 season the GT3 Cup gets additional 15 kW (now 309 kW) from its 3.6-litre engine. The 2005-2007 GT3 Cup and the 2008 GT3 Cup have their visual difference in the rear bumper - now the same design as the street GT3.

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The 997.1 GT3 Cup is built on the same line with the 997.2 street cars© Porsche
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The 2008 997 GT3 Cup is noticeable from its rear bumper which has the same design as the street GT3 3.6© Porsche
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2008 March 5, Hokenheimring test, 60x new 911 997 GT3 Cup 3.6 (309 kW)© Porsche
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2008 June 22, Supercup Photo Of The Year - Alessandro Zampedri's 997 GT3 Cup on one tyre© Andreas Beil

At the 2008 Le Mans 24H event works driver Patrick Long writes history when he turns a qualifying lap in the 997 GT3 RSR 3.8 of 3:58.152. The 4-minute mark was regarded as the barrier to break for the GT2 class cars (in which the GT3 RSR competed).

997 GT3 RSR 4.0, 2009 model

Announced in January 2009, the capacity of the 911 GT3 RSR was increased from 3.8 to 4.0 litres, but after another reduction in the size of the air intake restrictors the power was limited to 331 kW (for comparison 2008 RSR had 342 kW and 2006 RSR even 357 kW). The torque figure stayed on the 2008 RSR level - 430 Nm. For the 2009 car, the completely redesigned air ducting of the radiators became necessary for the installation of the air-conditioning unit. The oil refill with fast filling function was moved to the rear lid, giving mechanics better access. Weight: approx. 1220 kg/2690 lb complying with A.C.O. regulations and 1245 kg/2745 lb complying with FIA regulations. Around 20 cars were built.

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2009 January, Weissach: GT3 RSR 4.0 can be told by the vent in the front lid© Porsche
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The rear apron is slightly different from the previous version © Porsche
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The 4-litre masterpiece © Porsche
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© Porsche

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2009. Carrera Cup Scandinavia organizers tested GT3's on ice. At the wheel of the 911 997 GT3 Cup 3.6 is Carl Philip Bernadotte, Prince of Sweden.© Porsche
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2010 Le Mans 24H winning 997 GT3 RSR 4.0 of the GT2 category© Porsche
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2012 September 21-22 Saarland Rally, Germany, Timo Bernhard/Klaus Wicha 911 997 GT3 Cup© Porsche

Technical specifications 911 997.1 Coupé and Targa models

Modification Engine kW lb-ft Nm Gearbox 60 mph 100 km/h mph km/h kg lbs W/lbs W/kg
997.1 Carrera Coupé3.6F6239 kW272 lb-ft370 Nmmanual 6-speed4.8 sec.5.0 sec.177 mph285 km/h1395 kg3075 lb77.7 W/lb171 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed5.3 sec. 5.5 sec.174 mph280 km/h1435 kg3164 lb75.5 W/lb 167 W/kg
997.1 Carrera 4 Coupé3.6F6239 kW272 lb-ft370 Nmmanual 6-speed4.9 sec.5.1 sec.174 mph280 km/h1450 kg3197 lb74.8 W/lb165 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed5.4 sec.5.6 sec.171 mph275 km/h1490 kg3285 lb72.8 W/lb 160 W/kg
997.1 Targa 43.6F6239 kW272 lb-ft370 Nmmanual 6-speed5.1 sec.5.3 sec.174 mph280 km/h1510 kg 3329 lb71.8 W/lb158 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed5.6 sec.5.8 sec.171 mph275 km/h1550 kg3417 lb69.6 W/lb 154 W/kg
997.1 Carrera S Coupé3.8F6261 kW294 lb-ft400 Nmmanual 6-speed4.6 sec.4.8 sec.182 mph293 km/h1395 kg3075 lb84.9 W/lb187 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed5.1 sec.5.3 sec.179 mph288 km/h1435 kg3164 lb82.5 W/lb 182 W/kg
997.1 Carrera S WLS Coupé3.8F6280 kW305 lb-ft415 Nmmanual 6-speed4.4 sec. 4.6 sec.186 mph300 km/h1395 kg3075 lb91.0 W/lb201 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed4.9 sec.5.1 sec.183 mph294 km/h1435 kg3164 lb88.5 W/lb195 W/kg
997.1 Carrera 4S Coupé3.8F6261 kW294 lb-ft400 Nmmanual 6-speed4.6 sec.4.8 sec.179 mph288 km/h1475 kg3252 lb80.3 W/lb177 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed5.1 sec.5.3 sec.174 mph280 km/h1515 kg3340 lb78.1 W/lb 172 W/kg
997.1 Carrera 4S WLS Coupé3.8F6280 kW305 lb-ft415 Nmmanual 6-speed4.4 sec.4.6 sec.184 mph296 km/h1475 kg3252 lb86.1 W/lb190 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed4.9 sec.5.1 sec.180 mph290 km/h1515 kg3340 lb83.8 W/lb185 W/kg
997.1 Targa 4S3.8F6261 kW294 lb-ft400 Nmmanual 6-speed4.7 sec.4.9 sec.179 mph288 km/h1535 kg 3384 lb77.1 W/lb170 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed5.2 sec.5.4 sec.174 mph280 km/h1575 kg3472 lb75.2 W/lb 166 W/kg
997.1 Targa 4S WLS3.8F6280 kW305 lb-ft415 Nmmanual 6-speed4.5 sec.4.7 sec. 184mph296 km/h1535 kg 3384 lb82.7 W/lb182 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed5.0 sec.5.2 sec.180 mph290 km/h1575 kg3472 lb80.6 W/lb 178 W/kg
997 Turbo 3.63.6F6 TT353 kW456/
*500 lb-ft
620/
*680 Nm
manual 6-speed3.7 sec.3.9 sec.193 mph310 km/h1585 kg3494 lb101 W/lb223 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed3.5 sec.3.7 sec.193 mph310 km/h1620 kg3571 lb98.8 W/lb 218 W/kg
997 GT3 3.63.6F6305 kW298 lb-ft405 Nmmanual 6-speed4.1 sec.4.3 sec.193 mph310 km/h1395 kg 3031 lb99.2 W/lb219 W/kg
997 GT3 RS 3.63.6F6305 kW298 lb-ft405 Nmmanual 6-speed4.0 sec.4.2 sec.193 mph310 km/h1375 kg 3075 lb101 W/lb222 W/kg
997 GT23.6F6 TT390 kW500 lb-ft680 Nmmanual 6-speed3.5 sec.3.7 sec.204 mph329 km/h1440 kg 3175 lb123 W/lb271 W/kg
Attention: empty DIN weights used in the table
* Overboost

Technical specifications 911 997.1 Cabriolet models

Modification Engine kW lb-ft Nm Gearbox 60 mph 100 km/h mph km/h kg lbs W/lbs W/kg
997.1 Carrera Cabriolet3.6F6239 kW272 lb-ft370 Nmmanual 6-speed5.0 sec.5.2 sec.177 mph285 km/h1480 kg3263 lb73.2 W/lb161 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed5.5 sec.5.7 sec.174 mph280 km/h1520 kg3351 lb71.3 W/lb 157 W/kg
997.1 Carrera 4 Cabriolet3.6F6239 kW272 lb-ft370 Nmmanual 6-speed5.1 sec.5.3 sec.174 mph280 km/h1535 kg3384 lb70.6 W/lb156 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed5.6 sec.5.8 sec.171 mph275 km/h1575 kg3472 lb68.8 W/lb 152 W/kg
997.1 Carrera S Cabriolet3.8F6261 kW294 lb-ft400 Nmmanual 6-speed4.7 sec.4.9 sec.182 mph293 km/h1505 kg3318 lb78.7 W/lb173 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed5.2 sec.5.4 sec.177 mph285 km/h1545 kg3406 lb76.6 W/lb 169 W/kg
997.1 Carrera S WLS Cabriolet3.8F6280 kW305 lb-ft415 Nmmanual 6-speed4.5 sec.4.7 sec.186 mph300 km/h1505 kg3318 lb84.4 W/lb186 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed5.0 sec.5.2 sec.183 mph294 km/h1545 kg3406 lb82.2 W/lb 181 W/kg
997.1 Carrera 4S Cabriolet3.8F6261 kW294 lb-ft400 Nmmanual 6-speed4.7 sec.4.9 sec.179 mph288 km/h1560 kg3439 lb75.9 W/lb167 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed5.2 sec.5.4 sec.174 mph280 km/h1600 kg3527 lb74.0 W/lb 163 W/kg
997.1 Carrera 4S WLS Cabriolet3.8F6280 kW305 lb-ft415 Nmmanual 6-speed4.5 sec.4.7 sec.184 mph296 km/h1560 kg3439 lb81.4 W/lb179 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed5.0 sec.5.2 sec.180 mph290 km/h1600 kg3527 lb79.4 W/lb175 W/kg
997 Turbo 3.6 Cabriolet3.8F6353 kW456/
*500 lb-ft
620/
*680 Nm
manual 6-speed3.8 sec.4.0 sec.193 mph310 km/h1655 kg3649 lb96.7 W/lb213 W/kg
Tiptronic 5-speed3.6 sec.3.8 sec.193 mph310 km/h1690 kg3726 lb94.7 W/lb 209 W/kg
Attention: empty DIN weights used in the table
* Overboost

Conclusion on the tables above based on the most important performance figure, the power-to-weight ratio:
Formula for the slowest Porsche: automatic + 4WD + Cabriolet
Formula for the fastest Porsche: manual + RWD + Coupé

For example if you take the basic Carrera 3.6 Coupe with manual gearbox, then its power-to-weight ratio is 171 W/kg (77.7 W/lb). Now if you buy the 4WD, automatic gearbox and Cabriolet body, the figures with the same engine go down to 152 W/kg (68.8 W/lb), which means the car is now 13% weaker because of the extra weight. When you bought the brand new car, then you paid a premium of around 25% for all these things (gearbox, front wheel drive, open body) that made your car heavier. So, when considering the bang for your buck figure, then the difference is even over 40%.



Article © James Herne / Stuttcars.com


Sales catalogues

PDF 2005/12 911 Turbo 3.6 Coupé (3 MB)

PDF 2006/05 911 Carrera, 4, S, 4S, Coupé/Cabriolet, Targa 4/4S, X51 WLS (3 MB)

PDF 2006/07 911 GT3 3.6, GT3 RS 3.6 (4 MB)

PDF 2008/03 911 GT2 (3 MB)

PDF 2007/09 Porsche Service 911 Maintenance information (1 MB)


997.2 (2008-2012)

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Anniversaries
Mar, 27 – 19th death anniversary of Ferry Porsche (1998)
Apr, 04 – 41st birthday of the 936 (1976)
Apr, 05 – 52nd birthday of the 912 (1965)
Apr, 05 – 5th death anniversary of F.A. Porsche (2012)
Apr, 07 – 49th birthday of the 908 (1968)